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on January 8, 2018
I read Dyer before, and wanted to read more of him. I read the reviews of this book, and determined that *I* would be one of the ones who liked the book. He is a really good and clever writer, but after the first few essays, I lost interest. I thought, Here's a super-smart, privileged guy who gets to travel a lot, gets to get laid a lot, and gets to publish books about his own navel-gazing. Admittedly, the navel-gazing can be very shrewd, attentive, insightful, and funny (that's when the book was working for me), but after awhile, the material and the insights became very samey; and I just didn't care about the guy's "plight," if it can be called that, of being discontent and not being able to accomplish the writing he would like to. I basically skimmed the second half of the book.

What I *did* like, and notated in the book, are some passages that really shine. One rhetorical trademark of his is to write an experience, a moment, in a visual, kind of swirling and visceral way that is really quite beautiful - as in beautiful and effective writing. Also, he has a knack for writing about looking at himself looking at himself looking at himself in a kind of "Allegory of the Cave" mind-***k, which is also very well-done. So that's where the 3 starts comes in. I'm glad for those bits, but I would not have missed them had I chosen *not* to read this.
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on February 18, 2014
Not a collection of eleven desultory wanderings but a single story of Dyer's descent into what here in the States we might call a "midlife crisis" (Dyer never uses the phrase) which finds him in a slough of despond at age 42, his life having crumbled into thousands of discrete unrelated panic-filled seconds with no comic thread. Follows then his discovery of that thread at Burning Man and his detailed description of how personal time and space are pulled together in his head, his very special head and his wide-open willingness to share its exploration with us. So: a self-help book after all.
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on August 23, 2014
The book is great, but the kindle edition is terrible. There are errors on almost every page (capitalization, missing letters, etc). Seriously, how hard it is to proofread an e-book and check it's the same as the paper book. In a time of publishers defending the 9.99 price, they are going to have to be a little more careful than this.
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on November 9, 2017
Kind of a weird read but somewhat interesting. Haven't read anything else from this author so didn't have any expectations.
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on September 26, 2015
Very good. Very funny. Be prepared to laugh out loud. Dyer is my new hero.
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on January 29, 2014
I generally love Geoff Dyer's work, but I can't give this more than three stars because I felt like some of the stories were thematically repetitive, diving way too deep into abstractions. Still, it's a great little book to take your mind on a multinational journey to far-flung places like Libya, Burning Man, and the Thai islands, and indulge in Dyer's trenchant observations.
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on July 27, 2016
I found Geoff Dyer's book to be a bit more self-obsessed than I would have liked. He's clearly an intellectual but these stories just don't have much in the way of serious self-reflection. They're enjoyable enough but basically just travelogues.
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on August 11, 2014
Enjoyable read.
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on August 11, 2017
1 star cause there was no category 0 stars
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on July 29, 2014
Funny, adventurous, wandering the world. What a lifestyle!
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