Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.

Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Yoko Writes Her Name (A Yoko Book) Hardcover – July 29, 2008

4.7 out of 5 stars 11 customer reviews

See all 3 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Price
New from Used from
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$48.27 $1.24

Best Books of the Year So Far
Looking for something great to read? Browse our editors' picks for the Best Books of the Year So Far in fiction, nonfiction, mysteries, children's books, and much more.
click to open popover

Editorial Reviews

From School Library Journal

PreSchool-Grade 2—The endearing kitten introduced in Yoko (1998) and Yoko's Paper Cranes (2001, both Hyperion) returns in this lovely story illustrating the challenges facing young children who are bridging two cultures. Life for Yoko in the first week of school is anything but positive. In the eyes of the other children, her Japanese characters look like "baby marks," her numbers are just lines, and she "pretends" to read a book as she pages through it right to left instead of left to right. Olive and Sylvia decide that Yoko won't graduate from kindergarten, and soon the child is unhappily refusing her favorite sushi. Even with the considerate assistance of insightful Mrs. Jenkins and the support of her mother, the situation is not improved until a fellow student steps in. Angelo recognizes Yoko's characters as a secret language, and when she writes his name in Japanese, he shows her how to write the ABC's. After only a bit more classroom drama, all ends well with a kindergarten graduation and bilingual diplomas. This is a carefully crafted picture book with Asian-inspired illustrations that delight the eye just as the gentle story soothes the soul.—Piper Nyman, Brookmeade Elementary School, Nashville, TN
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

From Booklist

*Starred Review* When Yoko writes her name in Japanese instead of English, two classmates mock her and gleefully predict, “She won’t graduate from kindergarten.” Worried, Yoko hides under a table and is discovered by Angelo, who wants to learn how to write Japanese. In return, he shows her how to write her name “in ABCs.” Soon the entire class is learning how to write Japanese words, and graduation day has a distinctive Asian flavor, cheering even Yoko’s tormentors. In the sunny illustrations, Japanese and English labels on familiar objects invite children to write in both languages. Any child who has coped with being different, especially those from other cultures, will identify with Yoko’s painfully realistic dilemma, and others will understand Yoko’s palpable fear of failure. Once again, Yoko shares her Japanese culture in a story that can spark discussions about accepting and honoring differences. Meaningful and delightful in equal measure. Preschool-Grade 2. --Linda Perkins
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

The latest book club pick from Oprah
"The Underground Railroad" by Colson Whitehead is a magnificent novel chronicling a young slave's adventures as she makes a desperate bid for freedom in the antebellum South. See more

Product Details

  • Age Range: 3 - 6 years
  • Grade Level: Preschool - 1
  • Series: A Yoko Book
  • Hardcover: 32 pages
  • Publisher: Hyperion Book CH (July 29, 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0786803711
  • ISBN-13: 978-0786803712
  • Product Dimensions: 9 x 9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 9.6 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (11 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #428,784 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By Arie Farnam on July 6, 2012
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
My 3-year-old, who has some linguistic and ethnic difference issues to deal with herself, loves these books, appears to understand them and asks for them again and again.

I have one criticism on this book. The book shows Japanese characters but not very clearly and doesn't do much to help a child see them as a writing system just like ABCs. The graphics on that could be better.
Comment One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
A fun book about a bi-lingual child adjusting to life at school. My daughter is half-Japanese and could relate very well to Yoko's struggle to fit in, accepting her Japanese heritage and sharing it with others. I also used it in my classroom and the children enjoyed it, and we used it to discuss how all of the students are different. Highly recommended,
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Yoko Writes Her Name, written and illustrated by Rosemary Wells, tells a story familiar to many, how difficult it is to be the new kid on the block, the new student in the school, or worse yet a student who can speak English, but doesn't know how to write it. Competitive first graders play '"Graduation"' on the playground on her first day, where everyone but Yoko graduates. The story weaves a tale of pain and awareness as cultural traditions are learned and shared. Each page features a framed illustration depicting events and emotions. Instead of page numbers illustrations of a word, spelled in English are one page, with the Japanese spelling on the facing page. This is a delightful tale of what it means to be a newcomer, who with the help of parents, teachers and classmates learns how to write a new language, English, while sharing with others the way to write in Japanese. Children 5-9, as well as teachers and adults will find it both entertaining and instructive.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I am a retired teacher, who now teaches Japanese children to speak English. YOKO WRITES HER NAME is a wonderful book to use with Japanese students, especially the younger ones. It has common words on the corner of each page in both English and Japanese, which helps the teacher and students learn some Japanese, while teaching English. The story line shows how Yoko is accepted into her class by all the students first by Yoko teaching them how to write their names in Japanese. Subsequently, the class ends up learning Japanese as a second language. What a wonderful way to make a foreign child feel important and special.
Comment 2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
This is a very cute picture book. If you speak more than one language and you try to teach your kids another language, this is a good book to read. My kids are proud that they can recognize the Japanese Hiragana letters on the pages.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover
Yoko was a Japanese kitty cat and was very pleased with her efforts to write her name. "I am so proud, my little snow flower!" said Yoko's mother. When she got to school there were all kinds of different little animal children who were learning to write their names. Mrs. Jenkins thought that Yoko did a beautiful job with her name, but Sylvia and Olive thought her writing was nothing but scribbles. That kind of meanness would make any little girl want to cry!

Even when Yoko demonstrated her numbers on the blackboard, the girls still made fun of her, claiming she wouldn't graduate school at all. "Those aren't numbers. Those are just baby marks!" Things just seemed to go from bad to worse until Angelo said she had a secret language and wanted to learn it. Then things started to turn around when all the children suddenly wanted to learn their names in Japanese. Yoko might graduate after all.

This is a charming story that accentuates the fact that `differences' aren't necessarily a bad thing. On the upper corner of the right-hand page there is a small illustration and an English word below it. On the opposite page, there is its Japanese equivalent. This is a perfect classroom read aloud and discuss book. Can any of you write the word `hand' in both English and Japanese?
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Pages with Related Products. See and discover other items: children's chapter books