Buy Used
$5.75
FREE Shipping on orders over $49. Details
Used: Good | Details
Sold by Contreaux
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: Ships from Amazon!
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon

You Are The Quarry (Gatefold)

4.4 out of 5 stars 16 customer reviews

See all 5 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Price
New from Used from
Audio CD, May 18, 2004
$15.34 $0.24
Vinyl
"Please retry"
$350.00

Stream Millions of Songs FREE with Amazon Prime
Unlimited Streaming with Amazon Prime Start your 30-day free trial to stream millions of songs FREE with Amazon Prime. Start your free trial.

Editorial Reviews

Product Description

Morrissey You Are The Quarry US CD album

Amazon.com

Morrissey's first new album since the nineties is a triumph. Powered by a formidable quartet, the twin guitars spit fire that matches every wounded issue Morrissey tears into. Never one to mince words, he comes out swinging, taking America to task and then turning his attention on his homeland with the blistering "Irish Blood, English Heart." You Are the Quarry is so effective because it's less an overt rallying cry than a heartfelt plea for the world to make sense to him again. Elsewhere, relationships are given such a uniquely vibrant vantage point as to render any other angle blind. His wordplay mixes the coy invention of Cole Porter with a feisty contemporary showman's sense of stagecraft, wit, and drama. "Close your eyes, and think of someone you physically admire, and let me kiss you." It doesn't get much better to that. And wedded to charging hooks, these songs will move into your head and never leave. --David Greenberger

Track Listings

Disc: 1

  1. America Is Not The World
  2. Irish Blood, English Heart (1st single)
  3. I Have Forgiven Jesus
  4. Come Back To Camden
  5. I'm Not Sorry
  6. The World Is Full Of Crashing Bores
  7. How Could Anybody Possibly Know How I Feel
  8. First Of The Gang To Die
  9. Let Me Kiss You
  10. All The Lazy Dykes
  11. I Like You
  12. You Know I Couldn't Last


Product Details

  • Audio CD (May 18, 2004)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Label: Sanctuary Records
  • ASIN: B0001WAOH6
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (16 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #257,814 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

Amazon's Morrissey Store

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By Tim Brough VINE VOICE on May 24, 2004
Format: Audio CD
Seven years on the sidelines must have given Morrissey plenty of time to think about where his music has been, gone and will go, because when he finely sat down and recorded a new album, he sounded like Morrissey again. Like most of the reviewers here, I feel like this is his strongest work since those first couple of solo albums, filled with dour smiles and crusty observations. To wit, the state of pop music from singers "so scared to show intelligence, it might smear their lovely career." ("The World is Full Of Crashing Bores," which is a Moz title if ever there was.)
While songs like "Bores," "First Of The Gang to Die" and "Come Back to Camden" sure taste like Smiths/Morrissey of old, there are a couple of slam dunks that show an older and wizened Mo, in particular "America is Not The World" and "Irish Blood, English Heart." A stinging indictment of Bush politics and Prime Minister Tony Blair's willful lap dogging, it begs for understanding from a heart which "you say you don't need." Even with that kind of roiling discontent, "America" wouldn't be a Moz song without the get-out-clause, and here Morrissey ends the rant with the frustration of a patriot who tells his country and countrymen, "haven't you me with you now? I love you." It's a moment worthy of "The Queen Is Dead."
Even better is the album's first single, "Irish Blood English Heart," which compound those feelings. In lyrics that echo U2, Morrissey struggles with the love of homeland and the contorting dismay of, as he puts it, dreaming of being an Englishman who longs "...not to be baneful,
to be standing by the flag
not feeling shameful, racist or partial.
Read more ›
Comment 6 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Audio CD
It might just be that the patron saint of adolescent sexual frustration and malaise got tired of the shtick that made him so popular. From his pompadoured, "asexual" persona at the head of the Smiths to a decade of self-indulgent solo albums, Morrissey became very predictable: his album covers would feature a near-exact design, his song titles would be ridiculously wordy and the actual music would be relatively unremarkable.

That's changed. Morrissey hasn't sound this inspired since Viva Hate. In fact, songs like "Irish Heart, English Blood" actually rock - I would venture to say that Alain Whyte has finally proven to be a better co-writer than Stephen Street ever was (despite his helping to write "Suedehead"), and Morrissey finally manages to come across as being more honest than coy. "How Can Anyone Possibly Know How I Feel?" is indicative of this album as a whole: it retains Morrissey's biting, verbose lyrics (and title) and manages to be catchy at the same time. In fact, its guitar work sounds very similar to that of a brand-new band from Morrissey's dear Britain: Franz Ferdinand. The ability to confuse Morrissey's music with that of a band bursting with youthful vitality is a very, very pleasing thing.

This is the best work Morrissey has done in years, and it is most likely his best solo work yet. It's nice to see him finally step outside of his tired old formula; if this is his swan song, he's going out on a really high note.
Comment 6 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Audio CD
Many Moz purists were drawn to the Smith's because Morrissey's lyrics spoke to all the disenfranchised, odd and thoughtful youth who felt as if we were drowning in a morass of big hair bands swirling in a vacuous and offensive culture of excess. Morrissey gave us hope and inspiration. We found solice in the knowledge that we were understood. Unfortunately, his attempts to "break new ground" with "Southpaw Grammar" and "Maladjusted" strayed from the vein of inspiration that spoke to us in an intimate way. It seems that 7 years of separation from the industry has brought back the inspiration of the 80's. "You Are the Quarry" has that "magic". Its mixture of curious lyrics and tickling melodies only gets better the more you listen. Morrissey's voice somehow sounds better than ever; his smooth vibrato delicately soothes the soul and balms ones mental wounds. The poetry in lyrics will inspire a whole new generation.
Comment 4 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Audio CD
It's so nearly great. The guitars chug along, doing nothing we haven't heard guitars do before. Some of the songs are shapeless, more like rambles with a tune than actual songs. But some are almost perfect, and they all have moments that could only come from Morrissey. "America is not the world" starts off seeming like it'll be frankly embarrassing, a childish rant, and then twists round on itself to come out entirely different, a spurned lover's overreaction. "I have forgiven Jesus" seems to be a ripoff of the courtroom scene in Trainspotting, ironic and no more, and then with the line "I have forgiven Jesus/for all the love He placed in me" it assumes tragic proportions, steeped in original sin. "How can anybody possibly know how I feel?" obsessively repeats "because you wear a uniform", astonished at the arbitrariness of power and the easiness of brutality. Nothing here quite matches "Speedway" off Vauxhall and I, or "Every Day is Like Sunday" off Viva Hate -- none of the songs have quite the tightness of structure to deliver the punch full-force -- but he's certainly more than halfway back.
Comment 6 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Recent Customer Reviews


Forums