Im assuming any advertised capacity would be half using raid 1?

asked on July 4, 2016

Showing 1-9 of 9 answers

Well, this is an old question, so nobody will see my glorious contribution; but here goes anyway!

In order to use RAID 1, the two drives in use for that must be of the same size. They should be identical --- well nearly so. But, if one of the drives is slower than the other, the slower drive controls the speed (ob… see more
Well, this is an old question, so nobody will see my glorious contribution; but here goes anyway!

In order to use RAID 1, the two drives in use for that must be of the same size. They should be identical --- well nearly so. But, if one of the drives is slower than the other, the slower drive controls the speed (obviously). Two 6 TB drives in RAID 1, however, does not give you exactly 6 TB. There is a small part of the discs that gets assigned overhead duty to keep track of the status of the mirroring and to manage the mirroring. You could assume a high percentage --- maybe even more than 99%. I can't find any real figures for it, but since a 6 TB drive doesn't hold 6 TB anyway, you might just assume something like 5.98 TB for two nominal 6 TB drives in RAID 1.

Keep in mind that RAID isn't free!! Not only is the capacity of the RAID array less than the combined capacity of the drives, there is also a performance hit because everything has to be written more than once and depending on which RAID (n) you choose, it may be split across several drives. Another consideration which I had not previously considered is the age of the drives. If you start with two identical drives, four years from now each of those drives will have been in service for, guess what, four years. If one of them fails, the other may not be long behind. Some folks (what we usually refer to as "THEY") would suggest a mix of drive ages. Your mileage may vary, as "they" say. :-) see less
Well, this is an old question, so nobody will see my glorious contribution; but here goes anyway!

In order to use RAID 1, the two drives in use for that must be of the same size. They should be identical --- well nearly so. But, if one of the drives is slower than the other, the slower drive controls the speed (obviously). Two 6 TB drives in RAID 1, however, does not give you exactly 6 TB. There is a small part of the discs that gets assigned overhead duty to keep track of the status of the mirroring and to manage the mirroring. You could assume a high percentage --- maybe even more than 99%. I can't find any real figures for it, but since a 6 TB drive doesn't hold 6 TB anyway, you might just assume something like 5.98 TB for two nominal 6 TB drives in RAID 1.

Keep in mind that RAID isn't free!! Not only is the capacity of the RAID array less than the combined capacity of the drives, there is also a performance hit because everything has to be written more than once and depending on which RAID (n) you choose, it may be split across several drives. Another consideration which I had not previously considered is the age of the drives. If you start with two identical drives, four years from now each of those drives will have been in service for, guess what, four years. If one of them fails, the other may not be long behind. Some folks (what we usually refer to as "THEY") would suggest a mix of drive ages. Your mileage may vary, as "they" say. :-)

C Moore
· January 15, 2020
13 of 16 found this helpful. Do you?
| Report abuse
Your storage will not be "halved" as RAID1 is called "mirroring", which means it's an exact copy of the other disk. Both drives have to be of the same manufacturer and capacity for RAID to work. If you buy 2x 8TB drives, you will have 8TB's of storage. The whole point of a NAS is storage, so going RAID0 "striping" i… see more Your storage will not be "halved" as RAID1 is called "mirroring", which means it's an exact copy of the other disk. Both drives have to be of the same manufacturer and capacity for RAID to work. If you buy 2x 8TB drives, you will have 8TB's of storage. The whole point of a NAS is storage, so going RAID0 "striping" is just shooting yourself in the foot because if one drive fails then all data is lost, which defeats the purpose of having a Network Attached Storage device in the first place. You shouldn't need a NAS device backing up a NAS device if the entire point of buying a NAS device is storage to begin with. see less Your storage will not be "halved" as RAID1 is called "mirroring", which means it's an exact copy of the other disk. Both drives have to be of the same manufacturer and capacity for RAID to work. If you buy 2x 8TB drives, you will have 8TB's of storage. The whole point of a NAS is storage, so going RAID0 "striping" is just shooting yourself in the foot because if one drive fails then all data is lost, which defeats the purpose of having a Network Attached Storage device in the first place. You shouldn't need a NAS device backing up a NAS device if the entire point of buying a NAS device is storage to begin with.
Jessica
· September 4, 2018
1 of 10 found this helpful. Do you?
| Report abuse
The BOX when you get it will have this on it: 8TB and in much smaller print on the side: 2x 4TB. The size when set up for redundancy (RAID 1) will be the same size as ONE of the drives - the other is a perfect mirror for safety. WD Marketing is intentionally unclear on this, boo on them.
The Amazonner
· July 24, 2020
11 of 11 found this helpful. Do you?
| Report abuse
With RAID 1 (2 disks mandatory) storage capacity will be halved because one disk will be used for redundancy.
PS
· July 4, 2016
5 of 5 found this helpful. Do you?
| Report abuse
Yes. They are advertising the total capacity of the 2 drives.
Amazon Customer
· July 4, 2016
9 of 9 found this helpful. Do you?
| Report abuse
Yes, but its two drives, just go raid Zero and buy good drives, and back up any very important files on an external..
Emilio R.
· March 12, 2018
1 of 3 found this helpful. Do you?
| Report abuse
I notice the description does say “Up to 16TB of centralized storage for your entire network.” though which would indicate 2x8TB drives, following that logic anyways ...
Brian
· April 17, 2019
2 of 2 found this helpful. Do you?
| Report abuse
I’m honestly not sure. I’m looking for bug spray!
Rio555
· March 3, 2020
1 of 6 found this helpful. Do you?
| Report abuse
Yes correct.
ajay_makhija
· July 4, 2016
1 of 1 found this helpful. Do you?
| Report abuse
  • Previous
  • 1
  • Next