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Can you make less than 9 cups (which I assume are 1.5 ounce cups) in the espresso maker?

asked on October 5, 2012

Showing 1-10 of 12 answers

Espresso "cups" are two ounces. So the 6 cup model makes a max of 12 ounces. You can adjust with less water for strength changes or yes, less water and less grounds for less coffee. I own 3 different size moka pots depending on how many people are having coffee.
Samuel answered on October 5, 2012
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It's possible by using less water in the reservoir, but the quality is reduced if less grounds are used; so I would use the same amount of espresso and less water to make less
coffeeluvr answered on October 5, 2012
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Yes just remember to adjust your coffee accordingly otherwise you could end up with some pretty thick expresso.
Kenny the Floorman answered on October 6, 2012
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It is recommended to make the amount specified because otherwise it may be too weak or strong. Some people own a small pot for themselves and a larger one for company. The cups it makes are 2 ounces not 1.5. So the 3 cup maker will produce 3/4 of a measuring/baking cup. That fills up 4 little espresso cups for me. Bear… see more It is recommended to make the amount specified because otherwise it may be too weak or strong. Some people own a small pot for themselves and a larger one for company. The cups it makes are 2 ounces not 1.5. So the 3 cup maker will produce 3/4 of a measuring/baking cup. That fills up 4 little espresso cups for me. Bear in mind espresso is served only with sugar but most Americans might want to make cappuccino or lattes and this will increase the volume as well. see less It is recommended to make the amount specified because otherwise it may be too weak or strong. Some people own a small pot for themselves and a larger one for company. The cups it makes are 2 ounces not 1.5. So the 3 cup maker will produce 3/4 of a measuring/baking cup. That fills up 4 little espresso cups for me. Bear in mind espresso is served only with sugar but most Americans might want to make cappuccino or lattes and this will increase the volume as well.
myopiniononthis answered on December 22, 2014
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This makes a total of maybe 10 oz.
I'm guessing that because we get two sm espresso cups out of this with a little left over. Our cups hold about 4 oz.
you can make less I suppose!

SisterMargie answered on October 7, 2012
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Not sure what you are asking. This 6 cup maker can make less if you put less water in it. I often make half just for myself. Add less coffee to taste.
Steven Ward answered on October 5, 2012
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Yes! You can make as many cups as the product tolerates. For example, the 3 cup espresso maker, if you push the limits, you can get up to 4 cups. You can always remover water and make less cups--as needed---. Just be sure that, if you remove water, to also remove coffee; unless you wish to make really strong coffee--wh… see more Yes! You can make as many cups as the product tolerates. For example, the 3 cup espresso maker, if you push the limits, you can get up to 4 cups. You can always remover water and make less cups--as needed---. Just be sure that, if you remove water, to also remove coffee; unless you wish to make really strong coffee--which would be my case! At any rate, you can play with the amount of water you add to the product and the amount of coffee, too. The valve will remove the excess water as the pressure rises while heating ensues. If you have any other questions about the product, I'd be glad to let you know my experience with it--I have two of these wonderful machines. see less Yes! You can make as many cups as the product tolerates. For example, the 3 cup espresso maker, if you push the limits, you can get up to 4 cups. You can always remover water and make less cups--as needed---. Just be sure that, if you remove water, to also remove coffee; unless you wish to make really strong coffee--which would be my case! At any rate, you can play with the amount of water you add to the product and the amount of coffee, too. The valve will remove the excess water as the pressure rises while heating ensues. If you have any other questions about the product, I'd be glad to let you know my experience with it--I have two of these wonderful machines.
P. A. Wunderlich answered on October 5, 2012
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Sure get a smaller size or, seriously, just use 1/2 the water and 1/2 the coffee. It never seems to work quite as efficiently that way, but it works Greg
Gregory P. Lowell answered on February 28, 2013
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When you make less coffee than a full pot, the puck seems to still form pretty well and the flavor rounds out pretty much as a full pack. I tend to not use it so much as an espresso maker but my normal morning has about 3/4 of the hopper with coffee, water up just below the escape valve and it makes a nice full-flavor… see more When you make less coffee than a full pot, the puck seems to still form pretty well and the flavor rounds out pretty much as a full pack. I tend to not use it so much as an espresso maker but my normal morning has about 3/4 of the hopper with coffee, water up just below the escape valve and it makes a nice full-flavored, large mug of coffee. For espresso (I normally use my LaPavoni for that anyway), I've had pretty good luck packing the coffee tighter and not letting the water get all of the way to full steam vapors at the end of the brew cycle. If allowed to go to the full-steam end, it seems to extract acids a bit, putting a bit more bitterness into the result than I care for. Great little rigs that just plain work, but in my usage, it's more handy for that single, full-flavored morning mug. I think it's versatile enough for you to make partial pots with very little given away for results. see less When you make less coffee than a full pot, the puck seems to still form pretty well and the flavor rounds out pretty much as a full pack. I tend to not use it so much as an espresso maker but my normal morning has about 3/4 of the hopper with coffee, water up just below the escape valve and it makes a nice full-flavored, large mug of coffee. For espresso (I normally use my LaPavoni for that anyway), I've had pretty good luck packing the coffee tighter and not letting the water get all of the way to full steam vapors at the end of the brew cycle. If allowed to go to the full-steam end, it seems to extract acids a bit, putting a bit more bitterness into the result than I care for. Great little rigs that just plain work, but in my usage, it's more handy for that single, full-flavored morning mug. I think it's versatile enough for you to make partial pots with very little given away for results.
Craig Schroeder answered on October 5, 2012
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It makes one standard coffee mug sized cup.
KEmerick answered on October 5, 2012
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