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What kind of grind is best for this pot?

asked on December 23, 2012

Showing 1-10 of 17 answers

Depends on how strong you want your coffee to be. I use a medium-fine grind and let it bubble for about a minute before I take it off the heat. If you like your coffee stronger, a finer grind will increase it's flavor. BUT- too fine of a grind will have a tendency to clog the filter and dramatically increase the time i… see more Depends on how strong you want your coffee to be. I use a medium-fine grind and let it bubble for about a minute before I take it off the heat. If you like your coffee stronger, a finer grind will increase it's flavor. BUT- too fine of a grind will have a tendency to clog the filter and dramatically increase the time it takes for the coffee to return to the bottom pot, also increasing the coffee's flavor (maybe even too much).
Hope this helps. see less
Depends on how strong you want your coffee to be. I use a medium-fine grind and let it bubble for about a minute before I take it off the heat. If you like your coffee stronger, a finer grind will increase it's flavor. BUT- too fine of a grind will have a tendency to clog the filter and dramatically increase the time it takes for the coffee to return to the bottom pot, also increasing the coffee's flavor (maybe even too much).
Hope this helps.

Noel answered on December 23, 2012
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I've used all different grinds. I find the larger to medium grinds extract the most flavor from the coffee. The espresso finer grinds tend to take quite a while to drip and cause a bitter taste to the brew due to that long drip process. My advice...experiment! Happy Holidays!
G. Roberti answered on December 23, 2012
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Try medium fine to fine for a good starting point. Again, depends on the coffee, the temperature of the water, and your taste preferences.
pa-c man answered on December 23, 2012
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Due to the way this pot filters (granted, I use the glass filter), a slightly coarser grind seems to work best. A coarse grind allows better drainage around the filter, which is what you want. If you use the cloth filter that comes with it, you can go to a finer grind. If you haven't used this pot yet, boy are you i… see more Due to the way this pot filters (granted, I use the glass filter), a slightly coarser grind seems to work best. A coarse grind allows better drainage around the filter, which is what you want. If you use the cloth filter that comes with it, you can go to a finer grind. If you haven't used this pot yet, boy are you in for a treat! I've always been a French press devotee, but siphoned coffee is in a class of its own. I don't think there's a better way to brew. The resultant brew has the lovely body of a cup of French press, but siphoned coffee has no grit to it. It's like silk, with flavor beyond compare. It's just incredible. You won't believe it until you taste it. I can't recommend it highly enough. And this pot by Northwest Glass is excellent. One of my favorite kitchen buys of all time. You can still find the old fashioned Cory glass rods on ebay. I highly recommend picking up a couple of them. Try brewing with the cloth and then with the glass rod and see which you like more. I personally like the idea of using the glass rod more, since this way the coffee doesn't ever come in contact with anything but glass, and retains its purest possible integrity. I know you'll enjoy it as much as I do! see less Due to the way this pot filters (granted, I use the glass filter), a slightly coarser grind seems to work best. A coarse grind allows better drainage around the filter, which is what you want. If you use the cloth filter that comes with it, you can go to a finer grind. If you haven't used this pot yet, boy are you in for a treat! I've always been a French press devotee, but siphoned coffee is in a class of its own. I don't think there's a better way to brew. The resultant brew has the lovely body of a cup of French press, but siphoned coffee has no grit to it. It's like silk, with flavor beyond compare. It's just incredible. You won't believe it until you taste it. I can't recommend it highly enough. And this pot by Northwest Glass is excellent. One of my favorite kitchen buys of all time. You can still find the old fashioned Cory glass rods on ebay. I highly recommend picking up a couple of them. Try brewing with the cloth and then with the glass rod and see which you like more. I personally like the idea of using the glass rod more, since this way the coffee doesn't ever come in contact with anything but glass, and retains its purest possible integrity. I know you'll enjoy it as much as I do!
S. B., screenwriter answered on December 24, 2012
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Right in the middle works best for me. About what you would use for a drip machine, or slightly coarser. I've found that for small batches of coffee a finer grind works best, but for a full pot you want to go slightly coarser so the filter does not get clogged. Hope this helps
Zanzibar answered on December 23, 2012
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I use a medium grind. Finer grinds will clog it up. However, I use a Cory glass filter. Medium to fine grind may work OK with the cloth filter', but medium or larger seems to work best with the glass. But really it's not that 'picky'!
D. L. Pass answered on December 23, 2012
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I grind my own coffee. If u grind it at the store, try between fine n medium. U don't want it to fine or it will be bitter. I don't buy pre ground coffee.
dragonfly answered on December 23, 2012
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On my Capresso conical burr grinder, I get the best results right between medium and coarse. I've had decent results with finer grinds, but if you get too fine, then the bitter compounds are extracted too early.
Maurice Rickard answered on December 23, 2012
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I used coffee ground slightly coarse but it makes great coffee regardless of the grind. The problem with this item is that the coffee pot is not made to last. Don't worry about the grind, it won't last you long enough to make a difference. I replaced the coffee pot twice and gave up on it. It turned into a monthly expense.
Ruth S answered on December 23, 2012
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I dont have the "Exact Yama" grind per say, I also grind mine medium-fine, I guess. I have "Cory" filter for mine, which I think eliminates the clogging that paper filters are prone to. You will have to play with it a few times; I also find that nature of the coffee demands different brewing times: for Kenya, I like to… see more I dont have the "Exact Yama" grind per say, I also grind mine medium-fine, I guess. I have "Cory" filter for mine, which I think eliminates the clogging that paper filters are prone to. You will have to play with it a few times; I also find that nature of the coffee demands different brewing times: for Kenya, I like to leave it on for 120 sec; for regular Colombian, ~ minute and a half. With Espresso roast, one minute is quite enough. You will get a hang of it, its not difficult. see less I dont have the "Exact Yama" grind per say, I also grind mine medium-fine, I guess. I have "Cory" filter for mine, which I think eliminates the clogging that paper filters are prone to. You will have to play with it a few times; I also find that nature of the coffee demands different brewing times: for Kenya, I like to leave it on for 120 sec; for regular Colombian, ~ minute and a half. With Espresso roast, one minute is quite enough. You will get a hang of it, its not difficult.
Ogi answered on December 23, 2012
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