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Showing 1-10 of 961 questions
  • 49
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Answer:
If you want that double line of stitching that covers the raw edge of your hem on the back of the work, you can use a regular sewing machine and a double needle. It is a stretchable stitch so you can use it on knits or wovens. Double needles come in a couple different widths and aren't very expensive--a lot cheaper tha… see more If you want that double line of stitching that covers the raw edge of your hem on the back of the work, you can use a regular sewing machine and a double needle. It is a stretchable stitch so you can use it on knits or wovens. Double needles come in a couple different widths and aren't very expensive--a lot cheaper than a cover stitch machine! The wrong side of the fabric will look somewhat like it's been zigzagged. You just use 2 spools of thread on top or a spool and a wound bobbin of the same color. That's why there are usually 2 thread pegs on your machine. Hold the 2 threads together & thread the machine as usual until you get to the last 2 thread guides, then separate them so they don't twist together near the needles. see less If you want that double line of stitching that covers the raw edge of your hem on the back of the work, you can use a regular sewing machine and a double needle. It is a stretchable stitch so you can use it on knits or wovens. Double needles come in a couple different widths and aren't very expensive--a lot cheaper than a cover stitch machine! The wrong side of the fabric will look somewhat like it's been zigzagged. You just use 2 spools of thread on top or a spool and a wound bobbin of the same color. That's why there are usually 2 thread pegs on your machine. Hold the 2 threads together & thread the machine as usual until you get to the last 2 thread guides, then separate them so they don't twist together near the needles.
Amazon Customer
· March 27, 2018
  • 45
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Answer:
Ouch. Hopefully, they have good customer support to help you. The 1034D will do what a 4-thread serger does and you won't be disappointed. But that's about it.
Melissa
· July 31, 2020
  • 32
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Answer:
This serger is much easier to thread than others I have owned and used but it's not as simple as threading a regular sewing machine.
You must thread in the correct order to be successful. Watch some of the YouTube videos that demonstrate threading this machine. Then what I did was place a sticker underneath each tensi… see more
This serger is much easier to thread than others I have owned and used but it's not as simple as threading a regular sewing machine.
You must thread in the correct order to be successful. Watch some of the YouTube videos that demonstrate threading this machine. Then what I did was place a sticker underneath each tension dial and with a Sharpie marker, I wrote 1, 2, 3 and 4 on the appropriate sticker. That way I can tell at a glance what order I need to thread in. see less
This serger is much easier to thread than others I have owned and used but it's not as simple as threading a regular sewing machine.
You must thread in the correct order to be successful. Watch some of the YouTube videos that demonstrate threading this machine. Then what I did was place a sticker underneath each tension dial and with a Sharpie marker, I wrote 1, 2, 3 and 4 on the appropriate sticker. That way I can tell at a glance what order I need to thread in.

Terry in SA
· September 11, 2016
  • 19
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A regular sewing machine would be so much better and easier! I also own a Brother SE 400 and LOVE It! I would choose it over the Brother 1034D Serger.
Triciat
· December 8, 2014
  • 6
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This one works really well for rolled hems. I use it on chiffon all the time so it shouldn't have any trouble with cotton. I've also used the rolled hem function on knit and upholstery fabric with no problems
Guy Sander
· May 3, 2013
  • 6
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Answer:
What I do is buy two cones of my matching thread, then wind two bobbins with the same thread. I put the cones on the looper stands, and the bobbins on the needle stands. I also use neutral colors for the loopers, and will only purchase matching colors for the needles if the thread needed is very expensive. My main … see more What I do is buy two cones of my matching thread, then wind two bobbins with the same thread. I put the cones on the looper stands, and the bobbins on the needle stands. I also use neutral colors for the loopers, and will only purchase matching colors for the needles if the thread needed is very expensive. My main colors are white, black medium gray, cream. And as the majority of clothes made for myself are purple based, lavender, purple, red purple. Works great and I buy 6000 yd cones of the nuetrals. see less What I do is buy two cones of my matching thread, then wind two bobbins with the same thread. I put the cones on the looper stands, and the bobbins on the needle stands. I also use neutral colors for the loopers, and will only purchase matching colors for the needles if the thread needed is very expensive. My main colors are white, black medium gray, cream. And as the majority of clothes made for myself are purple based, lavender, purple, red purple. Works great and I buy 6000 yd cones of the nuetrals.
Melody LemaTop Contributor: Sewing
· February 25, 2016
  • 4
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Answer:
I have only had to adjust my tension one time and it did fine. I haven't done anything that I had to change the tension for. I will add that the only reason I had to adjust the tension was because my 2 yr old grand daughter thought the pretty dials would be fun to turn!
Rodney E.
· October 13, 2013
  • 3
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Until you get comfortable with your serger, you will probably want to make dresses on a regular sewing machine, because the serger is a trickier to use when you have any curves to sew (like very rounded collars). The serger is better at straight lines and can speed up large jobs such as blankets and quilts, though. I… see more Until you get comfortable with your serger, you will probably want to make dresses on a regular sewing machine, because the serger is a trickier to use when you have any curves to sew (like very rounded collars). The serger is better at straight lines and can speed up large jobs such as blankets and quilts, though. If you are only allowing one machine in your budget and want to construct clothing that is more than just basic designs, I would say get a regular machine; but to have the best of both worlds, to have a serger and a regular machine is recommended. see less Until you get comfortable with your serger, you will probably want to make dresses on a regular sewing machine, because the serger is a trickier to use when you have any curves to sew (like very rounded collars). The serger is better at straight lines and can speed up large jobs such as blankets and quilts, though. If you are only allowing one machine in your budget and want to construct clothing that is more than just basic designs, I would say get a regular machine; but to have the best of both worlds, to have a serger and a regular machine is recommended.
Laurie Romero
· February 24, 2014
  • 3
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Answer:
If you want to repair seams, hem and alterations, this is terrific and so much faster. Curves are a little tricky but with practice can be done. I have made many things, table runners, plastic bag holders etc all with the serger. They took all of 10-15 minutes to make and looked totally professional. You will love it.
Amazon fan
· January 4, 2015
  • 2
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Answer:
When I bought my machine, the seller listed the feet included in the bottom of the product description. Since the included feet could vary by seller, you'll need to read the product description that comes with the machine you plan to purchase and pick the one with the feet you want. The listing of feet in the produc… see more When I bought my machine, the seller listed the feet included in the bottom of the product description. Since the included feet could vary by seller, you'll need to read the product description that comes with the machine you plan to purchase and pick the one with the feet you want. The listing of feet in the product description should be just above where you typed your question. see less When I bought my machine, the seller listed the feet included in the bottom of the product description. Since the included feet could vary by seller, you'll need to read the product description that comes with the machine you plan to purchase and pick the one with the feet you want. The listing of feet in the product description should be just above where you typed your question.
A Consumer
· August 9, 2014