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Start with the binoculars, they are cheaper. If he's interested next year then get him this scope (make sure you purchase a better lens as this one is not very powerful). I bought this for my son for his 5th birthday because he was really interested in astronomy. We don't use it much because we can see almost the same … see more Start with the binoculars, they are cheaper. If he's interested next year then get him this scope (make sure you purchase a better lens as this one is not very powerful). I bought this for my son for his 5th birthday because he was really interested in astronomy. We don't use it much because we can see almost the same level of detail with his binoculars. If my son is still interested when he's 7, I will but him a more expensive scope. see less Start with the binoculars, they are cheaper. If he's interested next year then get him this scope (make sure you purchase a better lens as this one is not very powerful). I bought this for my son for his 5th birthday because he was really interested in astronomy. We don't use it much because we can see almost the same level of detail with his binoculars. If my son is still interested when he's 7, I will but him a more expensive scope.
By ev72178 on December 16, 2014
  • 4
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The huygens eyepieces that come with this set-up actually aren't that bad if the secondary mirror is collimated precisely. If it is just a little bit off, the 4mm eyepiece will have too much distortion to see Saturn's rings and Jupiter's bands. If it's collimated properly, the 4mm does a good job on the moon, and you c… see more The huygens eyepieces that come with this set-up actually aren't that bad if the secondary mirror is collimated precisely. If it is just a little bit off, the 4mm eyepiece will have too much distortion to see Saturn's rings and Jupiter's bands. If it's collimated properly, the 4mm does a good job on the moon, and you can make out saturn"s rings and just make out Jupiter's bands under good conditions, especially if the planets are close to opposition. I used a collimation cap to get it perfectly aligned and it makes a huge difference on planetary viewing, although the rings and bands will be just barely visible. Unfortunately, you probably can't buy a collimation cap anywhere. I looked. Mine came with a bigger scope. You could try calling Celestron or Orion and see if they could send you one, or look for directions to make one yourself. Or buy a laser collimator, which will cost as much as the scope. Otherwise, as far as eyepieces, get a 10mm kellner or a 10mm or 12.4mm plossl. If you want to upgrade the included eyepieces, get a 6.4mm plossl (generic is fine), but don't go lower than that. The scope cannot focus below about 6.4mm on a plossl. You could replace the 20mm huygens with a 20mm Kellner, or better yet, a 25mm plossl. see less The huygens eyepieces that come with this set-up actually aren't that bad if the secondary mirror is collimated precisely. If it is just a little bit off, the 4mm eyepiece will have too much distortion to see Saturn's rings and Jupiter's bands. If it's collimated properly, the 4mm does a good job on the moon, and you can make out saturn"s rings and just make out Jupiter's bands under good conditions, especially if the planets are close to opposition. I used a collimation cap to get it perfectly aligned and it makes a huge difference on planetary viewing, although the rings and bands will be just barely visible. Unfortunately, you probably can't buy a collimation cap anywhere. I looked. Mine came with a bigger scope. You could try calling Celestron or Orion and see if they could send you one, or look for directions to make one yourself. Or buy a laser collimator, which will cost as much as the scope. Otherwise, as far as eyepieces, get a 10mm kellner or a 10mm or 12.4mm plossl. If you want to upgrade the included eyepieces, get a 6.4mm plossl (generic is fine), but don't go lower than that. The scope cannot focus below about 6.4mm on a plossl. You could replace the 20mm huygens with a 20mm Kellner, or better yet, a 25mm plossl.
By Florprep on May 17, 2015
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This guy gives a great comparison. There are some minor but important differences that may matter to you.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BkgR_307OEo

By Ross Goddard on March 5, 2014
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Light pollution definitely affects a lot. You would be able to get close ups of the moon, and might be able to see faint outlines of the larger planets when they are closest to the earth - but as for any type of deep space viewing (which using this specific scope - I wouldn't think possible), you couldn't do it with s… see more Light pollution definitely affects a lot. You would be able to get close ups of the moon, and might be able to see faint outlines of the larger planets when they are closest to the earth - but as for any type of deep space viewing (which using this specific scope - I wouldn't think possible), you couldn't do it with such a light polluted area.
When I want to really view stars, I take my 8" Dobsonian out camping - even then, I need to take the scope far away from our campfire because the light from the fire distorts viewing to such a large degree. see less
Light pollution definitely affects a lot. You would be able to get close ups of the moon, and might be able to see faint outlines of the larger planets when they are closest to the earth - but as for any type of deep space viewing (which using this specific scope - I wouldn't think possible), you couldn't do it with such a light polluted area.
When I want to really view stars, I take my 8" Dobsonian out camping - even then, I need to take the scope far away from our campfire because the light from the fire distorts viewing to such a large degree.

By Aige on February 23, 2015
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Yes, 1.25 inch eyepiece.
By WhaddaHeck on December 17, 2014
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It comes with 2 eyepieces that change the "zoom" of the scope. That's all it comes with and some basic instructions.. YouTube is Great way to lean how to use a telescope too. The "accessory kit" looks like garbage ... Don't waste your money!
By drdan on December 15, 2013
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The Firstcope has a dobsonian base, in which you rotate the telescope 360 degrees and also up and down, therefore, there is no need of a tripod. Yes, you can use the telescope near the window and also on a table, as you need it.
By reviewer on December 2, 2013
  • 0
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Yes
By Dicester on February 23, 2015
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telescope
By Clyde L. Marney on August 12, 2014