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Showing 1-10 of 186 questions
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  • 35
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Answer:
It depends on the agent and the age of the extinguisher involved. Modern dry chemical extinguishers (>90% of home use models) can be discharged into a trash bag and the cylinder portion recycled. The chemical is non-toxic and can be disposed of at a sanitary landfill. Water and CO2 types can be discharged to the atmosp… see more It depends on the agent and the age of the extinguisher involved. Modern dry chemical extinguishers (>90% of home use models) can be discharged into a trash bag and the cylinder portion recycled. The chemical is non-toxic and can be disposed of at a sanitary landfill. Water and CO2 types can be discharged to the atmosphere and the cans recycled. Foam and water-based chemicals may be able to be discharged into a sanitary sewer (NOT storm drain) or may need to be collected for disposal by a haz-mat collection company. It depends on the laws where you live.

Halon and clean agent types should be returned to a fire extinguisher shop where the chemical can be reclaimed, as they are harmful to the environment as ozone-depleting substances.

Old or antique ones in unsafe or unknown condition should be taken to a fire extinguisher shop or household hazardous material collection center for advice. Trained personnel can depressurize or pack the extinguisher for transport. Some old fire extinguishers contain toxic chemicals like carbon tetrachloride, which are both toxic and carcinogenic. These should only be emptied/handled by trained people. see less
It depends on the agent and the age of the extinguisher involved. Modern dry chemical extinguishers (>90% of home use models) can be discharged into a trash bag and the cylinder portion recycled. The chemical is non-toxic and can be disposed of at a sanitary landfill. Water and CO2 types can be discharged to the atmosphere and the cans recycled. Foam and water-based chemicals may be able to be discharged into a sanitary sewer (NOT storm drain) or may need to be collected for disposal by a haz-mat collection company. It depends on the laws where you live.

Halon and clean agent types should be returned to a fire extinguisher shop where the chemical can be reclaimed, as they are harmful to the environment as ozone-depleting substances.

Old or antique ones in unsafe or unknown condition should be taken to a fire extinguisher shop or household hazardous material collection center for advice. Trained personnel can depressurize or pack the extinguisher for transport. Some old fire extinguishers contain toxic chemicals like carbon tetrachloride, which are both toxic and carcinogenic. These should only be emptied/handled by trained people.

Liz
· November 24, 2019
  • 20
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Answer:
The Tundra is advertised as a household/ kitchen fire extinguisher device. It is advertised as effective on grease, fabric, electrical, for use in the kitchen, garage, fireplace, workshop, and any room with candles. My experience with methanol around sprint cars proves that it does burn invisibly and with a blue flame … see more The Tundra is advertised as a household/ kitchen fire extinguisher device. It is advertised as effective on grease, fabric, electrical, for use in the kitchen, garage, fireplace, workshop, and any room with candles. My experience with methanol around sprint cars proves that it does burn invisibly and with a blue flame that is very difficult to see in bright sunlight. If in a contained area water is usable to extinguish a methanol fire ( if not in a contained area the water will spread the fire as it puts it out). When spilled on a dirt racetrack the only way we could deal with the spilled methanol was to burn it off. I have contacted First Alert Brand Products and they do not recommend using this product on a methanol fueled fire. It is designed as a household fire fighting device. see less The Tundra is advertised as a household/ kitchen fire extinguisher device. It is advertised as effective on grease, fabric, electrical, for use in the kitchen, garage, fireplace, workshop, and any room with candles. My experience with methanol around sprint cars proves that it does burn invisibly and with a blue flame that is very difficult to see in bright sunlight. If in a contained area water is usable to extinguish a methanol fire ( if not in a contained area the water will spread the fire as it puts it out). When spilled on a dirt racetrack the only way we could deal with the spilled methanol was to burn it off. I have contacted First Alert Brand Products and they do not recommend using this product on a methanol fueled fire. It is designed as a household fire fighting device.
Amazon Customer
· October 1, 2015
  • 13
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Answer:
Check out Battery University's explanation at http://batteryuniversity.com/learn/article/safety_concerns_with_li_ion. Here are some pertinent excerpts (focus on the difference between Lithium-metal and Lithium-ion):
- A small Li-ion fire can be handled like any other combustible fire. For best result use a foam ext… see more
Check out Battery University's explanation at http://batteryuniversity.com/learn/article/safety_concerns_with_li_ion. Here are some pertinent excerpts (focus on the difference between Lithium-metal and Lithium-ion):
- A small Li-ion fire can be handled like any other combustible fire. For best result use a foam extinguisher, CO2, ABC dry chemical, powdered graphite, copper powder or soda (sodium carbonate). If the fire occurs in an airplane cabin, the FAA instructs flight attendants to use water or soda pop. Water-based products are most readily available and are appropriate since Li-ion contains very little lithium metal that reacts with water. Water also cools the adjacent area and prevents the fire from spreading. Research laboratories and factories also use water to extinguish Li-ion battery fires. Halon is also used as fire suppressant, but this agent may not be sufficient to extinguish a large Li-ion fire in the cargo bay of an aircraft.
- A large Li-ion fire, such as in an EV, may need to burn out as water is ineffective. Water with copper material can be used, but this may not be available and is costly for fire halls.
- When encountering a fire with a lithium-metal battery, only use a Class D fire extinguisher. Lithium-metal contains plenty of lithium that reacts with water and makes the fire worse. As the number of EVs grows, so must the methods to extinguish such fires.
- Lithium-ion batteries contain little lithium metal and in case of a fire they can be dowsed with water. Only lithium-metal batteries require a Class D fire extinguisher.
- Water interacts with lithium. If a Class D extinguisher is not available to douse a lithium-metal fire, only pour water to prevent the fire from spreading.
- For best results dowsing a Li-ion fire, use a foam extinguisher, CO2, ABC dry chemical, powdered graphite, copper powder or soda (sodium carbonate) as you would extinguish other combustible fires. Reserve the Class D extinguishers for lithium-metal fires only.
- If the fire of a burning lithium-ion battery cannot be extinguished, allow the pack to burn in a controlled and safe way. see less
Check out Battery University's explanation at http://batteryuniversity.com/learn/article/safety_concerns_with_li_ion. Here are some pertinent excerpts (focus on the difference between Lithium-metal and Lithium-ion):
- A small Li-ion fire can be handled like any other combustible fire. For best result use a foam extinguisher, CO2, ABC dry chemical, powdered graphite, copper powder or soda (sodium carbonate). If the fire occurs in an airplane cabin, the FAA instructs flight attendants to use water or soda pop. Water-based products are most readily available and are appropriate since Li-ion contains very little lithium metal that reacts with water. Water also cools the adjacent area and prevents the fire from spreading. Research laboratories and factories also use water to extinguish Li-ion battery fires. Halon is also used as fire suppressant, but this agent may not be sufficient to extinguish a large Li-ion fire in the cargo bay of an aircraft.
- A large Li-ion fire, such as in an EV, may need to burn out as water is ineffective. Water with copper material can be used, but this may not be available and is costly for fire halls.
- When encountering a fire with a lithium-metal battery, only use a Class D fire extinguisher. Lithium-metal contains plenty of lithium that reacts with water and makes the fire worse. As the number of EVs grows, so must the methods to extinguish such fires.
- Lithium-ion batteries contain little lithium metal and in case of a fire they can be dowsed with water. Only lithium-metal batteries require a Class D fire extinguisher.
- Water interacts with lithium. If a Class D extinguisher is not available to douse a lithium-metal fire, only pour water to prevent the fire from spreading.
- For best results dowsing a Li-ion fire, use a foam extinguisher, CO2, ABC dry chemical, powdered graphite, copper powder or soda (sodium carbonate) as you would extinguish other combustible fires. Reserve the Class D extinguishers for lithium-metal fires only.
- If the fire of a burning lithium-ion battery cannot be extinguished, allow the pack to burn in a controlled and safe way.

Marc S.
· December 24, 2017
  • 8
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Answer:
Yes, it’s January 2021 and I just used one that expired in 2016 to put out a kitchen fire yesterday that almost got very bad, and would have without an extinguisher nearby
hgrif
· January 20, 2021
  • 4
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Answer:
the instructions on the side of the can say "use all contents. discard after use. use for small fires only and do not attempt to fight large fires that are too difficult to fight safely from 3 to 4 feet." we have 2 cans in our kitchen and a large extinguisher in our cellar and 1 in our garage. I SUGGEST ONCE.
STASH&STELLA
· January 13, 2017
  • 4
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Answer:
Purchased mine in December 2013 and expiration date is 4/17/18.
Edward S.
· April 11, 2014
  • 3
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Answer:
Yes!! It is good for grease fires.
Reid
· November 11, 2017
  • 1
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Yes, this does have a tight-fitting clear plastic cap, altho I think that if I was to pack it in a snowmobile I may want to put a strip of duct tape or something similar around it that can be removed quickly, just in case. Every snowmobile ride I've ever taken has been pretty bouncy......
Brettt
· November 18, 2019
  • 1
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Answer:
All fire extinguishers leave a mess.
MellosMom
· October 26, 2020
  • 1
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Answer:
Well, this is a Fire Extinguisher, so I guess the ingredients would be a fire retardant. No where on the can does it give any "contents" or "ingredients". For household use on electrical, grease, cloth and wood fires. Hope this helps.
Herman F. East
· October 20, 2017