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This item does not support iPhone
By Raul on November 11, 2013
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It comes with a wide variety of charging tips, but you can contact the seller directly and ask about your phone's specific type. They responded to my questions nicely.
By Netizen on June 6, 2013
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It doesn't "work" with any phone. You can connect it and crank like mad, it will not charge phones. Nifty little light, but it's a lousy excuse for a charger.
By P. Kender on March 13, 2013
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I have a similar hand crank charger / flashlight. Internally, mine has an alternator with a rotating permanent magnet inside a stationary field that has several poles and coils. The coils are interconnected with a group of silicon diodes to convert the AC output from the coils into pulsing DC. The output from the di… see more I have a similar hand crank charger / flashlight. Internally, mine has an alternator with a rotating permanent magnet inside a stationary field that has several poles and coils. The coils are interconnected with a group of silicon diodes to convert the AC output from the coils into pulsing DC. The output from the diodes is wired to a coin style rechargeable lithium battery. I think the battery is about 3 volts. The "charger" output on mine is a coaxial plug with a switch that disconnects one of the battery terminals, and allows the output of the alternator and rectifier array to charge an external battery. My guess is the voltage and current are both variable, but the diodes prevent any reverse current flow, and the output of the alternator without a load is in the region of 8 to 12 volts, but with a load the output drops to a little above the battery terminal voltage. The current is limited by several factors: the strength of the permanent magnet, the force you apply to the crank, and the load resistance. My cell phone has a charging regulator inside the phone, so I just turn the crank until I feel some resistance to my cranking. At that moment, my phone's LCD shows an animation that it is charging. After several (10 to 15) minutes of steady cranking, the crank suddenly becomes a lot easier to turn, and the LCD on the phone shows the phone is fully charged. My phone's wall charger says its output is 5.3 volts at 500 ma, so I would put the output of the crank charger in the same ballpark. You probably want to make sure you are using your charger with a battery powered device because the raw output of the alternator and rectifiers is unfiltered, unregulated, but full wave rectified AC. Pulsing DC like that is fine for battery charging, but not usable for powering a device without a filter capacitor and possibly some sort of crude regulator as a replacement for a battery. A battery connected to this charger will behave a bit like a filter capacitor and a crude regulator, smoothing out most of the AC ripple present in the output of the hand cranked alternator / rectifier. I think the battery inside my hand cranked charger / flashlight lasts 10 or 15 minutes, at probably 100 ma before the LEDs become too dim. So my guess is this unmarked battery has a capacity of 200 or 300 MaH at 3 volts. see less I have a similar hand crank charger / flashlight. Internally, mine has an alternator with a rotating permanent magnet inside a stationary field that has several poles and coils. The coils are interconnected with a group of silicon diodes to convert the AC output from the coils into pulsing DC. The output from the diodes is wired to a coin style rechargeable lithium battery. I think the battery is about 3 volts. The "charger" output on mine is a coaxial plug with a switch that disconnects one of the battery terminals, and allows the output of the alternator and rectifier array to charge an external battery. My guess is the voltage and current are both variable, but the diodes prevent any reverse current flow, and the output of the alternator without a load is in the region of 8 to 12 volts, but with a load the output drops to a little above the battery terminal voltage. The current is limited by several factors: the strength of the permanent magnet, the force you apply to the crank, and the load resistance. My cell phone has a charging regulator inside the phone, so I just turn the crank until I feel some resistance to my cranking. At that moment, my phone's LCD shows an animation that it is charging. After several (10 to 15) minutes of steady cranking, the crank suddenly becomes a lot easier to turn, and the LCD on the phone shows the phone is fully charged. My phone's wall charger says its output is 5.3 volts at 500 ma, so I would put the output of the crank charger in the same ballpark. You probably want to make sure you are using your charger with a battery powered device because the raw output of the alternator and rectifiers is unfiltered, unregulated, but full wave rectified AC. Pulsing DC like that is fine for battery charging, but not usable for powering a device without a filter capacitor and possibly some sort of crude regulator as a replacement for a battery. A battery connected to this charger will behave a bit like a filter capacitor and a crude regulator, smoothing out most of the AC ripple present in the output of the hand cranked alternator / rectifier. I think the battery inside my hand cranked charger / flashlight lasts 10 or 15 minutes, at probably 100 ma before the LEDs become too dim. So my guess is this unmarked battery has a capacity of 200 or 300 MaH at 3 volts.
By Robert Getsla on November 5, 2013
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Sorry, I give this out as a gift.
By butterflyrobin on November 4, 2013
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