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  • 18
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Answer:
If they are fully drained, up to 90 minutes
By Larrymartin107 on August 22, 2017
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Yes. However, using a cheap charger, one that has a timer, can damage the batteries and they always cause them to not last nearly as long. A smart charger measures the voltage among other indicators, to determine when the battery is fully charged. There some really good and/or expensive smart chargers and I have tried … see more Yes. However, using a cheap charger, one that has a timer, can damage the batteries and they always cause them to not last nearly as long. A smart charger measures the voltage among other indicators, to determine when the battery is fully charged. There some really good and/or expensive smart chargers and I have tried a few. Two of my favorites are the Titanium Innovations MD-1600L and the La Crosse BC-500. Both come with a car cigarette plug so it can be used on the go. The MD-1600L also has two USB ports, so I can charge two phones and 16 AA or AAA batteries all at once. Both of these chargers allow you to charge 1 battery at a time or use every slot. I hope this helps someone. see less Yes. However, using a cheap charger, one that has a timer, can damage the batteries and they always cause them to not last nearly as long. A smart charger measures the voltage among other indicators, to determine when the battery is fully charged. There some really good and/or expensive smart chargers and I have tried a few. Two of my favorites are the Titanium Innovations MD-1600L and the La Crosse BC-500. Both come with a car cigarette plug so it can be used on the go. The MD-1600L also has two USB ports, so I can charge two phones and 16 AA or AAA batteries all at once. Both of these chargers allow you to charge 1 battery at a time or use every slot. I hope this helps someone.
By Rifleman on July 1, 2014
  • 12
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The Sanyo/Panasonic eneloop cells can be recharged in any good-quality charger designed for NiMH batteries.
For best battery lifespan, choose a 'smart' charger that has a charge time between 2 and 5 hours.
Avoid slow, timer-based dumb charger that will over-charge your batteries, and 'ultra-fast' 30-minute chargers th… see more
The Sanyo/Panasonic eneloop cells can be recharged in any good-quality charger designed for NiMH batteries.
For best battery lifespan, choose a 'smart' charger that has a charge time between 2 and 5 hours.
Avoid slow, timer-based dumb charger that will over-charge your batteries, and 'ultra-fast' 30-minute chargers that will over-heat your batteries. see less
The Sanyo/Panasonic eneloop cells can be recharged in any good-quality charger designed for NiMH batteries.
For best battery lifespan, choose a 'smart' charger that has a charge time between 2 and 5 hours.
Avoid slow, timer-based dumb charger that will over-charge your batteries, and 'ultra-fast' 30-minute chargers that will over-heat your batteries.

By NLee the Engineer on July 31, 2014
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Batteries are made in Japan, Chargers are made in China.
By DepotEco SELLER on December 4, 2015
  • 3
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I've measured some batteries using a micrometer. Alkaline AA cells are typically 14 mm in diameter. Some NiMH cells are about 14 and a quarter mm in diameter including Eneloops. I've only had a problem with them in some flashlights that had a very narrow bore. Even then, I was able to get them in and out, but it wa… see more I've measured some batteries using a micrometer. Alkaline AA cells are typically 14 mm in diameter. Some NiMH cells are about 14 and a quarter mm in diameter including Eneloops. I've only had a problem with them in some flashlights that had a very narrow bore. Even then, I was able to get them in and out, but it wasn't very easy. see less I've measured some batteries using a micrometer. Alkaline AA cells are typically 14 mm in diameter. Some NiMH cells are about 14 and a quarter mm in diameter including Eneloops. I've only had a problem with them in some flashlights that had a very narrow bore. Even then, I was able to get them in and out, but it wasn't very easy.
By DaveH_SF on June 22, 2015
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It's the quality of your charger. Good chargers will analyze each cell individually, monitor the individual cell throughout charging and keep the batteries from overheating which can ruin rechargeables. Your charger analyzes two batteries and charges them together. I doubt your charger monitors the batteries (in pai… see more It's the quality of your charger. Good chargers will analyze each cell individually, monitor the individual cell throughout charging and keep the batteries from overheating which can ruin rechargeables. Your charger analyzes two batteries and charges them together. I doubt your charger monitors the batteries (in pairs for yours) when charging them. If you are serious about using rechargeables you will want a good charger it will save you money in ruined batteries that would have lasted years more with a top charger. I can attest to the quality, I have replaced every battery in my home, I have nearly 100 aa and aaa batteries some I have had for years and havent lost a battery. I have a la crosse bc-1000. I don't make money recommending anything I do it for my reputation on amazon and helping people. Get a good charger I can guarantee you will save money in the long run. You can get any of the la crosse bc series I believe they are basically the same except for quick charging options which I don't even use, just pop them in and go and charged in about 3 hours. The la crosse bc-700 is $40 and the bc-1000 $59, you will save money nit ruining your eneloop batteries. I have about 15aa and 15aaa charger and ready to use in standby. see less It's the quality of your charger. Good chargers will analyze each cell individually, monitor the individual cell throughout charging and keep the batteries from overheating which can ruin rechargeables. Your charger analyzes two batteries and charges them together. I doubt your charger monitors the batteries (in pairs for yours) when charging them. If you are serious about using rechargeables you will want a good charger it will save you money in ruined batteries that would have lasted years more with a top charger. I can attest to the quality, I have replaced every battery in my home, I have nearly 100 aa and aaa batteries some I have had for years and havent lost a battery. I have a la crosse bc-1000. I don't make money recommending anything I do it for my reputation on amazon and helping people. Get a good charger I can guarantee you will save money in the long run. You can get any of the la crosse bc series I believe they are basically the same except for quick charging options which I don't even use, just pop them in and go and charged in about 3 hours. The la crosse bc-700 is $40 and the bc-1000 $59, you will save money nit ruining your eneloop batteries. I have about 15aa and 15aaa charger and ready to use in standby.
By Jeremyrnr on March 1, 2015
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Bought some of the older model for the same purpose and they are on two years and still going strong
By alex on October 4, 2014
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Yes Panasonic Now owns eneloop. and Sanyo.
By DepotEco SELLER on September 7, 2015
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Answer:
They're "AAA" batteries, so if your phone accepts "AAA" batteries they'll work.
By Stephen Nierzwicki on January 11, 2015
  • 2
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Answer:
On a full charge they could reach up to 1.5 volts.. but once they cool off it's more like 1.4 volts, then they rest around 1.3 volts. Most throughout the operation of rechargeable NiMHs they are at 1.2 volts. If you don't have any NiMH batteries you could get these and try them out, if not they work in most flashlights… see more On a full charge they could reach up to 1.5 volts.. but once they cool off it's more like 1.4 volts, then they rest around 1.3 volts. Most throughout the operation of rechargeable NiMHs they are at 1.2 volts. If you don't have any NiMH batteries you could get these and try them out, if not they work in most flashlights and from anything to clocks to remotes. Get the bundle pack with the charger so you have a way to recharge these once they go dead. see less On a full charge they could reach up to 1.5 volts.. but once they cool off it's more like 1.4 volts, then they rest around 1.3 volts. Most throughout the operation of rechargeable NiMHs they are at 1.2 volts. If you don't have any NiMH batteries you could get these and try them out, if not they work in most flashlights and from anything to clocks to remotes. Get the bundle pack with the charger so you have a way to recharge these once they go dead.
By Midnight Distortions on November 17, 2014