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  • 26
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Answer:
The difference are the batteries, the charger has the same model # BQ-CC17.
The "pro" batteries have a capacity of 2450mAh but only 500 recharge cycles, the "non pro" batteries have a capacity of 2000mAh but the famous ____2100____ recharge cycles. The charger is slow, but that is the method Panasonic uses to get 2100 … see more
The difference are the batteries, the charger has the same model # BQ-CC17.
The "pro" batteries have a capacity of 2450mAh but only 500 recharge cycles, the "non pro" batteries have a capacity of 2000mAh but the famous ____2100____ recharge cycles. The charger is slow, but that is the method Panasonic uses to get 2100 cycles. So it is a trade off, more power for the same time period, 25% more, (or same power for 25% longer) but at 500 recharge cycles versus 2100 cycles.
Hope that helps CC see less

By Charles Clayton on July 31, 2014
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The spacers use 1 AA battery and it can be used in generally any device that requires C or D batteries. The major drawback is that while the devices run the same 1.5 voltage per battery the lack of mAh or capacity is apparent with using an AA as a D battery. I prefer looking for a 2AA spacer like this - http://www.amaz… see more The spacers use 1 AA battery and it can be used in generally any device that requires C or D batteries. The major drawback is that while the devices run the same 1.5 voltage per battery the lack of mAh or capacity is apparent with using an AA as a D battery. I prefer looking for a 2AA spacer like this - http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00EL0RPLM/
which doubles the mAh capacity on a single battery. Depending on what device you use them on it could be useful or a headache as either you'll need to remove the battery to recharge them as they die or get more spacers and AA batteries. I have used the 2AA spacers with some regular Eneloops and they lasted the rated time stated on my 2D LED Maglite, but instead of dimming out a little the flashlight had nearly depleted the batteries. Still, they worked for a reasonable amount of time and at the most i would only need to carry an extra set of spacers with some Eneloops to easily swap them out.
Some people got 5-6 hours on their toys or baby rockers with these spacers which imo wasn't bad, they would just have to do the same or to get the 2AA spacers which would double the run time. I wonder why Panasonic doesn't have 2AA spacers instead or at the very least offer the real C or D rechargeable batteries, which is an expensive alternative but well worth it since there are plenty of devices that require D batteries. see less

By Midnight Distortions on October 21, 2014
  • 15
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The 4 indicator lights are hidden underneath the plastic case. Once you insert a battery, you'll see its corresponding light comes up.
By NLee the Engineer on July 5, 2014
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A total of 16 batteries plus 4 adapters. You can insert one AA battery in each adapter, the adapter is a spacer so that an AA battery takes up the space of a C or D battery. A rechargeable AA battery can put out more power per second than a D cell alkaline battery, so it works. Non rechargeable batteries have more o… see more A total of 16 batteries plus 4 adapters. You can insert one AA battery in each adapter, the adapter is a spacer so that an AA battery takes up the space of a C or D battery. A rechargeable AA battery can put out more power per second than a D cell alkaline battery, so it works. Non rechargeable batteries have more of a voltage drop under heavy load than rechargeable batteries. see less
By William Strickler on December 24, 2014
  • 7
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This charger does charge each cell individually. It also has individual lights that indicate when a battery is charging and the lights turn off when it is done. I hope this helps .
By Rocking Rod on July 30, 2014
  • 7
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As long as your battery has the right chemistry (NiMH) and size (AA or AAA), you can charge it in this BQ-CC17 charger.
By NLee the Engineer on July 5, 2014
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The charging current is 300mA. So to recharge a set of 2000mAh batteries will take about 7 hours (2000mAh/300mA = ~7h). Shorter if the batteries were only partially drained.
By NLee the Engineer on July 22, 2014
  • 3
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The image appears to match the description, indicating that it comes with eight AA cells and two AAA cells. Also included are 2 "C"-sized spacers and 2 "D"-sized spacers plus the charger itself. The charger accommodates AA and AAA cells only. Inserting a AA cell into either a "C" or "D" sized spacer allows the AA cell … see more The image appears to match the description, indicating that it comes with eight AA cells and two AAA cells. Also included are 2 "C"-sized spacers and 2 "D"-sized spacers plus the charger itself. The charger accommodates AA and AAA cells only. Inserting a AA cell into either a "C" or "D" sized spacer allows the AA cell to masquerade as a "C" or "D" cell, thus allowing you to power devices that normally would require "C" or "D" cells. see less
By Yuckmo on August 26, 2015
  • 3
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The charger SHOULD turn off or provide a low level trickle charge, so leaving the batteries in the charger should not be a problem. BUT, most of the chargers I have purchased over the years had "fine print" in the directions not to leave the batteries in the charger for more than 24 hours. Why? I don't know, but I m… see more The charger SHOULD turn off or provide a low level trickle charge, so leaving the batteries in the charger should not be a problem. BUT, most of the chargers I have purchased over the years had "fine print" in the directions not to leave the batteries in the charger for more than 24 hours. Why? I don't know, but I make it a practice to remove the batteries after no more than 12 hours. see less
By alanhouston on November 5, 2014