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  • 35
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Answer:
Yes, I use it as a Plex server and it works fine. I stream to iPad or Apple TV; no stuttering or buffering. All my movies are ripped mkv; i use the SRT subtitles format. As of March 9, 2020, no problems. Well, there is a problem with Music Playlists, but it seems to be an Apple TV problem, so my work-around is to fli… see more Yes, I use it as a Plex server and it works fine. I stream to iPad or Apple TV; no stuttering or buffering. All my movies are ripped mkv; i use the SRT subtitles format. As of March 9, 2020, no problems. Well, there is a problem with Music Playlists, but it seems to be an Apple TV problem, so my work-around is to fling my nighttime Playlist from my iPad to the ATV, and it works perfectly now. The Music Playlists used to work great on the ATV, until just a couple months ago. Somebody’s update messed up something. But as far as the NAS is concerned, I think it’s great. But I’m just one person, no other users. see less Yes, I use it as a Plex server and it works fine. I stream to iPad or Apple TV; no stuttering or buffering. All my movies are ripped mkv; i use the SRT subtitles format. As of March 9, 2020, no problems. Well, there is a problem with Music Playlists, but it seems to be an Apple TV problem, so my work-around is to fling my nighttime Playlist from my iPad to the ATV, and it works perfectly now. The Music Playlists used to work great on the ATV, until just a couple months ago. Somebody’s update messed up something. But as far as the NAS is concerned, I think it’s great. But I’m just one person, no other users.
Nemo-Nova
· March 9, 2020
  • 12
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Well, this is an old question, so nobody will see my glorious contribution; but here goes anyway!

In order to use RAID 1, the two drives in use for that must be of the same size. They should be identical --- well nearly so. But, if one of the drives is slower than the other, the slower drive controls the speed (ob… see more
Well, this is an old question, so nobody will see my glorious contribution; but here goes anyway!

In order to use RAID 1, the two drives in use for that must be of the same size. They should be identical --- well nearly so. But, if one of the drives is slower than the other, the slower drive controls the speed (obviously). Two 6 TB drives in RAID 1, however, does not give you exactly 6 TB. There is a small part of the discs that gets assigned overhead duty to keep track of the status of the mirroring and to manage the mirroring. You could assume a high percentage --- maybe even more than 99%. I can't find any real figures for it, but since a 6 TB drive doesn't hold 6 TB anyway, you might just assume something like 5.98 TB for two nominal 6 TB drives in RAID 1.

Keep in mind that RAID isn't free!! Not only is the capacity of the RAID array less than the combined capacity of the drives, there is also a performance hit because everything has to be written more than once and depending on which RAID (n) you choose, it may be split across several drives. Another consideration which I had not previously considered is the age of the drives. If you start with two identical drives, four years from now each of those drives will have been in service for, guess what, four years. If one of them fails, the other may not be long behind. Some folks (what we usually refer to as "THEY") would suggest a mix of drive ages. Your mileage may vary, as "they" say. :-) see less
Well, this is an old question, so nobody will see my glorious contribution; but here goes anyway!

In order to use RAID 1, the two drives in use for that must be of the same size. They should be identical --- well nearly so. But, if one of the drives is slower than the other, the slower drive controls the speed (obviously). Two 6 TB drives in RAID 1, however, does not give you exactly 6 TB. There is a small part of the discs that gets assigned overhead duty to keep track of the status of the mirroring and to manage the mirroring. You could assume a high percentage --- maybe even more than 99%. I can't find any real figures for it, but since a 6 TB drive doesn't hold 6 TB anyway, you might just assume something like 5.98 TB for two nominal 6 TB drives in RAID 1.

Keep in mind that RAID isn't free!! Not only is the capacity of the RAID array less than the combined capacity of the drives, there is also a performance hit because everything has to be written more than once and depending on which RAID (n) you choose, it may be split across several drives. Another consideration which I had not previously considered is the age of the drives. If you start with two identical drives, four years from now each of those drives will have been in service for, guess what, four years. If one of them fails, the other may not be long behind. Some folks (what we usually refer to as "THEY") would suggest a mix of drive ages. Your mileage may vary, as "they" say. :-)

C Moore
· January 15, 2020
  • 7
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2 4TB drives wich can then be run in a raid configuration.
Jeff M.
· January 4, 2018
  • 6
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Yes. A long story short, my WD My Cloud Mirror suffered a "blown out" ethernet port due to a lightening strike. I purchased the EX2 Ultra (diskless) and placed my old WD Red drives, that were in the My Cloud Mirror, and it worked flawlessly. It didn't skip a beat. I was up and running like nothing happened. I was … see more Yes. A long story short, my WD My Cloud Mirror suffered a "blown out" ethernet port due to a lightening strike. I purchased the EX2 Ultra (diskless) and placed my old WD Red drives, that were in the My Cloud Mirror, and it worked flawlessly. It didn't skip a beat. I was up and running like nothing happened. I was so relieved that the content on the drives were unaffected! see less Yes. A long story short, my WD My Cloud Mirror suffered a "blown out" ethernet port due to a lightening strike. I purchased the EX2 Ultra (diskless) and placed my old WD Red drives, that were in the My Cloud Mirror, and it worked flawlessly. It didn't skip a beat. I was up and running like nothing happened. I was so relieved that the content on the drives were unaffected!
Lefty C
· September 23, 2019
  • 1
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Yes, you can use multiple EX2 NAS drives inside your home, each connected via Ethernet to your home network. In my home, I have two sitting side-by-side on a sideboard credenza, each connected via Ethernet cable to a small Ethernet switch. However, I have given each of the devices a static IP address through my home's … see more Yes, you can use multiple EX2 NAS drives inside your home, each connected via Ethernet to your home network. In my home, I have two sitting side-by-side on a sideboard credenza, each connected via Ethernet cable to a small Ethernet switch. However, I have given each of the devices a static IP address through my home's router system, although DHCP works as well. You would then set up each of the drives with a designated naming convention (Drive 1, Drive 2...well, maybe you'll want to be more creative than that). The drives in my home are set up as "His" and "Hers." :-) You'd then set up user access credentials (user name and password) for each device (they need to be different creds), and then use the My Cloud software from WD (free) to "toggle" between the two drives. Sometimes, your computer or device will lose your UACs, so you just have to log back in using MyCloud.com. As long as both devices are set up in the same way, switching between the devices is relatively easy. On a Mac or PC, you can also "map" each drive to your desktop (X: drive, Z: drive, etc.), and access files in a familiar hierarchical file structure. However, you have to be on the same network for these drive designations to connect at log-on. For example, if you have a drive at home, and one at your business office, you may have each mapped with different drive designations. If you boot up at home, you'll likely see "not all network drives are connected" with a "red-x" over the drive's desktop icon for your business NAS drive. That just means you have to revert to the MyCloud software to access the business drive from your home.

I even access any of my two drives at home, and our two drives at my business office, anywhere anytime using the MyCloud software on my notebook computer, tablet or Smartphone. You just have to toggle between the drive names in your app, and the rest is relatively easy. Keep in mind that "opening" a large image file at home using access to your remote business EX2 can be slow since you'll be working on typically slower home networking speeds. I'm fortunate in that my neighborhood is wired with fiber optic cable, so I'm connected at Gigabit speeds. It's not cheap, but it's cost-effective based on my business needs.

Good luck! see less
Yes, you can use multiple EX2 NAS drives inside your home, each connected via Ethernet to your home network. In my home, I have two sitting side-by-side on a sideboard credenza, each connected via Ethernet cable to a small Ethernet switch. However, I have given each of the devices a static IP address through my home's router system, although DHCP works as well. You would then set up each of the drives with a designated naming convention (Drive 1, Drive 2...well, maybe you'll want to be more creative than that). The drives in my home are set up as "His" and "Hers." :-) You'd then set up user access credentials (user name and password) for each device (they need to be different creds), and then use the My Cloud software from WD (free) to "toggle" between the two drives. Sometimes, your computer or device will lose your UACs, so you just have to log back in using MyCloud.com. As long as both devices are set up in the same way, switching between the devices is relatively easy. On a Mac or PC, you can also "map" each drive to your desktop (X: drive, Z: drive, etc.), and access files in a familiar hierarchical file structure. However, you have to be on the same network for these drive designations to connect at log-on. For example, if you have a drive at home, and one at your business office, you may have each mapped with different drive designations. If you boot up at home, you'll likely see "not all network drives are connected" with a "red-x" over the drive's desktop icon for your business NAS drive. That just means you have to revert to the MyCloud software to access the business drive from your home.

I even access any of my two drives at home, and our two drives at my business office, anywhere anytime using the MyCloud software on my notebook computer, tablet or Smartphone. You just have to toggle between the drive names in your app, and the rest is relatively easy. Keep in mind that "opening" a large image file at home using access to your remote business EX2 can be slow since you'll be working on typically slower home networking speeds. I'm fortunate in that my neighborhood is wired with fiber optic cable, so I'm connected at Gigabit speeds. It's not cheap, but it's cost-effective based on my business needs.

Good luck!

Jim The Golf Pro
· November 7, 2017
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Old question, but I'll add - There are apps for iPhone / iPad which make accessing files really simple. You can also sign in via the web as you would with other cloud services. For what it's worth, you can also easily create a link to share a folder or file with someone, and assign either read-only or read/write access.
JoeTaxpayer
· February 19, 2020
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Yes.
homealone
· June 4, 2017
  • 1
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Answer:
In Windows Explorer in Windows 10, in the left pane click on your "This PC" or whatever name you've given it. In earlier versions of Windows, I think you can be anywhere in Windows Explorer.

Here you are give the opportunity in the Toolbar to Map a Network Drive under the "Manage" umbrella. Pick a drive letter nea… see more
In Windows Explorer in Windows 10, in the left pane click on your "This PC" or whatever name you've given it. In earlier versions of Windows, I think you can be anywhere in Windows Explorer.

Here you are give the opportunity in the Toolbar to Map a Network Drive under the "Manage" umbrella. Pick a drive letter near the end of the alphabet (leave the early letters available for local non-network drives), and enter the UNC location of \\MyClouldEX2Ultra\Public, or whatever you've named your device and shared folder. You'll probably want to check the box for Reconnect at sign-in. If you've set up passwords on different shares, you'll have to enter those details here as well under the Connect using different credentials box. see less
In Windows Explorer in Windows 10, in the left pane click on your "This PC" or whatever name you've given it. In earlier versions of Windows, I think you can be anywhere in Windows Explorer.

Here you are give the opportunity in the Toolbar to Map a Network Drive under the "Manage" umbrella. Pick a drive letter near the end of the alphabet (leave the early letters available for local non-network drives), and enter the UNC location of \\MyClouldEX2Ultra\Public, or whatever you've named your device and shared folder. You'll probably want to check the box for Reconnect at sign-in. If you've set up passwords on different shares, you'll have to enter those details here as well under the Connect using different credentials box.

Roygbiv
· April 11, 2020
  • 1
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This is not a USB Hub.
It requires at least one drive to install the software and the installation will format it and so any information on it will be lost.

Julian Murguia
· May 26, 2017
  • 1
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Yes. This unit is set up with raid 1 already. I use a 2 terabyte raid 1 and it works fine
Alec A.
· September 19, 2017