Customer Questions & Answers

Find answers in product info, Q&As, reviews

There was a problem completing your request. Please try your search again later.
All Product Information Customer Q&A's Customer Reviews

Your question may be answered by sellers, manufacturers, or customers who purchased this item, who are all part of the Amazon community.

Please make sure that you are posting in the form of a question.

Please enter a question.

Showing 1-10 of 1000+ questions
Sort by
  • 27
    vote

    votes
Answer:
How can you tell whether an ext. hard drive runs at 5400, 5900,7200 rpm without going to multiple places and still not be sure of the speed? Also can you just search for WD with a particular "color' series?
ANACONDA
· January 24, 2018
  • 16
    vote

    votes
Answer:
A desktop hard drive requires both 12 volts and 5 volts for power while a USB port only supplies 5 volt power. A laptop hard drive does not require 12V power which is why portable drives based on such drives can be powered by the USB port.
NL31
· November 28, 2017
  • 15
    vote

    votes
Answer:
We'll need to clarify "speed" vs. rpm to answer the spirit of your question.
First, to answer one of the above commenters,- Having RAID doesn't alter the disk spin rate of each drive, and for the original poster the hard drive rpm speed is not necessarily directly tied to the ultimate "speed" you're thinking of, for g… see more
We'll need to clarify "speed" vs. rpm to answer the spirit of your question.
First, to answer one of the above commenters,- Having RAID doesn't alter the disk spin rate of each drive, and for the original poster the hard drive rpm speed is not necessarily directly tied to the ultimate "speed" you're thinking of, for general questions of speed you should be looking at the Data Read/Write speeds. This unit does have RAID 0 setup out of the box with two 4TB WD Red 5400 rpm drives. But the fact that it's 5400 rpm isn't because it's "cheapo" as mentioned above, it's a very deliberate decision on behalf of the product manufacturers, for very good reason.
Most "NAS Certified" spinning hard drives, as the WD Red series is, are 5400 rpm, this is because NAS devices are generally always left on, so that any PC on the network can access the device when needed. Using 5400 rpm drives in this way saves power consumption for each drive; it also keeps the radiant heat down coming off each and every drive in the NAS unit (this unit only has two hard drives but they can have any number of drives: 2, 4, 5, 8, 12, even more in high end units), so if you keep a unit like this on in your room or office it keeps the temperature of the room cooler; it also extends the life of each of the drives, slower spinning disks are proven to be less likely to run into issues than their faster spinning counterparts, and a longer life is CRITICALLY important given the use case of these drives as RAID enabled backup/storage destinations-
If RAID 1 is being used, the higher the drive failure rate, the more often you need to be reacting quickly to replace the failed drive, because the second a drive dies in a RAID array you're up against a clock of unknown time-limit counting down to the loss of your data, because if another drive dies before you replace the first and rebuild the array, you will lose all the data on the NAS (in most cases);
If RAID 0 is being used as is setup by default, you lose ALL the data the moment EITHER drive dies.
So drive longevity is very important.

Beyond all those benefits, there's one very important reason to note regarding why it doesn't really negatively impact speed very noticeably when 5400 rpm drives are used-
Drives used in a RAID array work as a team, and generally speaking the more drives in a RAID array the faster the read speed, because reads for each file are distributed across all of the spinning disks, meaning the 2 discs in RAID 0 only need to spin up to retrieve half the file each. 3 Discs? 1/3 the seek time (i'm oversimplifying but that's generally a good way to look at it). Given these massive speed increases while working in parallel, any speed bottlenecks you may run into are just as likely to be due to any number of other interface areas.

TL;DR- 5400 rpm is GOOD for NAS devices! Increasing to 7200 rpm provides negligible data access speed increases, and could cause various long-term issues. If you need a drive speed increase nowadays you simply pay-up for SSD drives and live in luxury. see less
We'll need to clarify "speed" vs. rpm to answer the spirit of your question.
First, to answer one of the above commenters,- Having RAID doesn't alter the disk spin rate of each drive, and for the original poster the hard drive rpm speed is not necessarily directly tied to the ultimate "speed" you're thinking of, for general questions of speed you should be looking at the Data Read/Write speeds. This unit does have RAID 0 setup out of the box with two 4TB WD Red 5400 rpm drives. But the fact that it's 5400 rpm isn't because it's "cheapo" as mentioned above, it's a very deliberate decision on behalf of the product manufacturers, for very good reason.
Most "NAS Certified" spinning hard drives, as the WD Red series is, are 5400 rpm, this is because NAS devices are generally always left on, so that any PC on the network can access the device when needed. Using 5400 rpm drives in this way saves power consumption for each drive; it also keeps the radiant heat down coming off each and every drive in the NAS unit (this unit only has two hard drives but they can have any number of drives: 2, 4, 5, 8, 12, even more in high end units), so if you keep a unit like this on in your room or office it keeps the temperature of the room cooler; it also extends the life of each of the drives, slower spinning disks are proven to be less likely to run into issues than their faster spinning counterparts, and a longer life is CRITICALLY important given the use case of these drives as RAID enabled backup/storage destinations-
If RAID 1 is being used, the higher the drive failure rate, the more often you need to be reacting quickly to replace the failed drive, because the second a drive dies in a RAID array you're up against a clock of unknown time-limit counting down to the loss of your data, because if another drive dies before you replace the first and rebuild the array, you will lose all the data on the NAS (in most cases);
If RAID 0 is being used as is setup by default, you lose ALL the data the moment EITHER drive dies.
So drive longevity is very important.

Beyond all those benefits, there's one very important reason to note regarding why it doesn't really negatively impact speed very noticeably when 5400 rpm drives are used-
Drives used in a RAID array work as a team, and generally speaking the more drives in a RAID array the faster the read speed, because reads for each file are distributed across all of the spinning disks, meaning the 2 discs in RAID 0 only need to spin up to retrieve half the file each. 3 Discs? 1/3 the seek time (i'm oversimplifying but that's generally a good way to look at it). Given these massive speed increases while working in parallel, any speed bottlenecks you may run into are just as likely to be due to any number of other interface areas.

TL;DR- 5400 rpm is GOOD for NAS devices! Increasing to 7200 rpm provides negligible data access speed increases, and could cause various long-term issues. If you need a drive speed increase nowadays you simply pay-up for SSD drives and live in luxury.

Shane B
· July 28, 2018
  • 9
    vote

    votes
Question:
Answer:
I am 100% certain that the drive inside is 5400 RPM. The 4TB is a ASIN:B013HNYV8I WD Blue WD40EZRZ 5400rpm.
See my review: https://www.amazon.com/review/R388G5P0ACHROS

Engr. Jay Mendoza
· November 1, 2016
  • 6
    vote

    votes
Answer:
The drives that were in it probably weren't the buyers drives, he/she prolly pulled them from used crap somewhere, pocketed the nice, new 4tb drives, then shipped back crap knowing it wouldn't be checked properly, then resold to someone else, leaving the burden of proof on them if they wanted to return them.

So many… see more
The drives that were in it probably weren't the buyers drives, he/she prolly pulled them from used crap somewhere, pocketed the nice, new 4tb drives, then shipped back crap knowing it wouldn't be checked properly, then resold to someone else, leaving the burden of proof on them if they wanted to return them.

So many scams on here that you have to watch out for these days :/ see less
The drives that were in it probably weren't the buyers drives, he/she prolly pulled them from used crap somewhere, pocketed the nice, new 4tb drives, then shipped back crap knowing it wouldn't be checked properly, then resold to someone else, leaving the burden of proof on them if they wanted to return them.

So many scams on here that you have to watch out for these days :/

Mike2501
· February 10, 2020
  • 4
    vote

    votes
Answer:
Yes. It is best to reformat if you will only be using it with a Mac.
homealone
· November 9, 2017
  • 3
    vote

    votes
Answer:
The Drives AFAIK are comfortable with 110v-240v. Im in Australia (240v) and seems to work fine. If you are concerned drop-in replacement adapters which have standard euro sockets (search mycartmax ebay) are about $8-10US, I would recommend a correct plug adapter anyway to avoid cheap international adapters. The price c… see more The Drives AFAIK are comfortable with 110v-240v. Im in Australia (240v) and seems to work fine. If you are concerned drop-in replacement adapters which have standard euro sockets (search mycartmax ebay) are about $8-10US, I would recommend a correct plug adapter anyway to avoid cheap international adapters. The price cannot be beaten (I study cryptography so go through a lot of drives) even adding in the cost of a replacement adapter the drive is a good buy. see less The Drives AFAIK are comfortable with 110v-240v. Im in Australia (240v) and seems to work fine. If you are concerned drop-in replacement adapters which have standard euro sockets (search mycartmax ebay) are about $8-10US, I would recommend a correct plug adapter anyway to avoid cheap international adapters. The price cannot be beaten (I study cryptography so go through a lot of drives) even adding in the cost of a replacement adapter the drive is a good buy.
Amazon Customer
· May 18, 2017
  • 3
    vote

    votes
Answer:
I think you are worried if you unplug the power cord is your data on the hard drive going to disappear permanently when you plug the power cord back? If this is what you meant to ask yes the data will still be there if you saved the data and properly waited for it to write the data to the hard drive before unplugging … see more I think you are worried if you unplug the power cord is your data on the hard drive going to disappear permanently when you plug the power cord back? If this is what you meant to ask yes the data will still be there if you saved the data and properly waited for it to write the data to the hard drive before unplugging the USB and power brick cable. Do not turn off the power until either the data has been written or at least a minute has passed since any activity to the drive if you're really concerned. The safest is to eject the USB drive from Windows and wait for it to say it is safe to unplug the device. But since you can usually see the light flashing when it is reading or writing this will usually indicate it is safe to unplug. see less I think you are worried if you unplug the power cord is your data on the hard drive going to disappear permanently when you plug the power cord back? If this is what you meant to ask yes the data will still be there if you saved the data and properly waited for it to write the data to the hard drive before unplugging the USB and power brick cable. Do not turn off the power until either the data has been written or at least a minute has passed since any activity to the drive if you're really concerned. The safest is to eject the USB drive from Windows and wait for it to say it is safe to unplug the device. But since you can usually see the light flashing when it is reading or writing this will usually indicate it is safe to unplug.
Versatile Explorer
· January 16, 2017
  • 3
    vote

    votes
Answer:
The duo's capacity is the the total of the two disks. 20TB = 2x10TB.
Engr. Jay Mendoza
· August 23, 2017
  • 2
    vote

    votes
Answer:
I am 95% certain that the drive inside is a ASIN:B013HNYVCE WD Blue WD60EZRZ 5400rpm.
The one I got is the 4TB, which is a ASIN:B013HNYV8I WD Blue WD40EZRZ 5400rpm.
See my review: https://www.amazon.com/review/R388G5P0ACHROS

Engr. Jay Mendoza
· November 1, 2016