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The cask of Amontillado

3.9 out of 5 stars 19 customer reviews

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About the Series. Preface. 1. INTRODUCTION. Edgar Allan Poe and a Heart Grown Sick. 2. LITERATURE. About the Author: Edgar Allan Poe. "The Cask of Amontillado." Discussion Questions. Research Topics. 3. SECONDARY SOURCES. "The Christian Catacombs of Rome: Introduction, History, and Outline of the Catacombs." The Christian Catacombs of Rome. 7 Mar 2003. Istituto Salesiano San Callisto--Roma. 23 Apr. 2003. Poe, Edgar Allan. "To John Allan." 3 Jan. 1831. Edgar Allan Poe Letters Till Now Unpublished in the Valentine Museum. Ed. Mary Stanard. Philadelphia: Lippincott, 1925. Poe, Edgar Allan. "To John Allan." 15 Dec. 1831. Edgar Allan Poe Letters Till Now Unpublished in the Valentine Museum. Ed. Mary Stanard. Philadelphia: Lippincott, 1925. Poe, Edgar Allan. "To John Allan." 12 Apr. 1833. Edgar Allan Poe Letters Till Now Unpublished in the Valentine Museum. Ed. Mary Stanard. Philadelphia: Lippincott, 1925. Poe, Edgar Allan. "Thomas Dunn English." The Complete Works of Edgar Allan Poe. Ed. James A. Harrison. New York: AMS, 1965. Poe, Edgar Allan. From "The Imp of the Perverse." The Complete Works of Edgar Allan Poe. Ed. James A. Harrison. New York: AMS, 1965. Simms,William Gilmore. "Letter to Edgar Allan Poe." July 30, 1846. The Letters of William G. Simms. Ed. Mary Simms Oliphant et. al. Vol. 2. Columbia: U of Carolina P, 1952?1956. Dedmond, Francis P. "'The Cask of Amontillado' and the War of the Literati." Modern Language Quarterly 15.2 (1954). Moss, Sidney P. "Poe and the Saint Louis Daily Reveille." Poe Newsletter 1.2 (1968). White, Patrick. "'The Cask of Amontillado': A Case for the Defense." Studies in Short Fiction 26.4 (1989). Lovecraft, Howard Phillips. From Supernatural Horror in Literature. New York: Dover, 1927. Peeples, Scott. From Edgar Allan Poe Revisited. New York: Twayne, 1998. Platizky, Roger. "Poe's 'The Cask of Amontillado.'" Explicator 57.4 (1999). Boutler, Doug. "'Lines on Ale': A Covert Action in the Longfellow War?" ANQ 14.1 (2000). 4. SAMPLE STUDENT RESEARCH PAPER. Biographical Sources for "The Cask of Amontillado." 5. BIBLIOGRAPHY. Works by Edgar Allan Poe. Journals Dedicated to Poe. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

About the Author

Author, poet, and literary critic, Edgar Allan Poe is credited with pioneering the short story genre, inventing detective fiction, and contributing to the development of science fiction. However, Poe is best known for his works of the macabre, including such infamous titles as The Raven, The Pit and the Pendulum, The Murders in the Rue Morgue, Lenore, and The Fall of the House of Usher. Part of the American Romantic Movement, Poe was one of the first writers to make his living exclusively through his writing, working for literary journals and becoming known as a literary critic. His works have been widely adapted in film. Edgar Allan Poe died of a mysterious illness in 1849 at the age of 40. --This text refers to the Paperback edition.
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Product Details

  • Unknown Binding
  • Publisher: Anne and David Bromer (1981)
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B0006YG3ZG
  • Average Customer Review: 3.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (19 customer reviews)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
The Case of Amontillado by Edgar Allan Poe is a classic tale of revenge. Since there are over a dozen posts here, my review will take a particular slant: what German pessimistic philosopher Arthur Schopenhauer has to say about the psychology of revenge and how the revengeful narrator in Poe's tale relates to Schopenhauer's insights.

Schopenhauer says we all suffer as the result of nature or chance but, as humans, we recognizes that is simply the way life works. He then writes, "Suffering caused by the will of another, on the other hand, includes a quite peculiar and bitter addition to the pain or injury itself, namely the consciousness of someone else's superiority, whether in point of strength or of cunning, together with that of one's own impotence." It's that person to person dynamic that gives us the real sting; someone intentionally shoves or hits us, humiliates or insults us, and, for whatever reason, we simply take it. This is what happened in the aristocrat-narrator's mind - he was insulted by Fortunato. I say `in the aristocrat-narrator's mind' since we as readers don't know if Fortunato actually intended to insult him.

Schopenhauer sees two phases of compensation for the person who has suffered at the hands of another. 1) direct and legal - a stranger hits us and we take him to court and win a settlement 2) revenge - to deal with the psychological afterglow of the stranger's blow. Here are his words: "Recompense, if possible, can cure the injury done; but that bitter addition, the feeling `and that is what I have to put up with from you' which often hurts more than the injury itself, can be neutralized only by revenge." The narrator says his is not of a nature to merely threat.
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Format: Library Binding
I read this story in college (English 2) and i must say this was probably the best horror story i've ever read.
First, i like to forget about the words he uses for a minute to explain that, although magnificently written, i take the story for how it was meant to be interpreted. And it was meant to leave you with a chill, and a feeling of despair that was so violently left in my stomach that i had to read it again and again.
I can't wait to be sitting around the camp fire to tell this story.
As far as the literary value, i am not shy in saying i didn't understand many of the words, but that's what a dictionary is for, and with the use of both books i came away thrilled with knowing and understanding what is probably one of the best horror stories ever written.
The story is a macabre tail of two men, both upper classmen mindful of their positions in society. One of them; seemingly distraught over past wrongs done, strives to avenge his house by comitting one brutal act. His prey however, does not know his fate until it has met him alone, and face to face...
Big Cheers to Poe for an amazingly entertaining story.
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By A Customer on February 18, 1999
Format: Library Binding
This is Classic Poe... It was a required reading for me in school but after I read it I was compelled to re-read it. This story captivates the reader, while forcing you to ask, Why? Poe never really gets into the insult that occurred, but it is obivious that Poe is the master of Payback. He takes one of his greatest fears, being buried alive and transcends it into this story. What I find fascinating it the extent that he is willing to go to exact his revenge. Not only is his enemy buried alive, but he knows the person who has committed this endeavor
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Format: Kindle Edition
As one would expect from Edgar Allan Poe, this short story is certainly a visit to the Dark Side of the Force. In order to take revenge for a perceived insult, Montresor tricks and then traps the unsuspecting Fortunato by luring him into a catacomb with the promise of good wine. Avoiding spoilers, let us just say that it is the most costly wine for which Fortunato will ever have to pay. True to the Poe process, don't expect a happy ending here. Written cleverly, wittily, and with great use of literary irony, THE CASK OF AMONTILLADO is viewed by many scholars as Poe's most perfect short story.
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Format: Kindle Edition
"A wrong is unredressed when the retribution overtakes its redresser. It is equally unredressed when the avenger fails to make himself felt as such to him who has done the wrong." With this cruel vengeance Montresor, with malicious patience and deceptive friendliness, lured Fortunato into the vault and buried him alive in a niche. The reader knows the target to be doomed and watched the drunken man step deeper into the snare.
As usual, Poe was able to portray the criminal mind, with its unrepentant hatred and cruel delight, as if he were a comrade.
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Format: Library Binding
The Cask of Amontillado is full of verbal, situational, and dramatic irony.It is wonderfully written, and is one of Poe's best short stories. Poe encorperates his fear of being buried alive into this chilling tale.
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Format: Audible Audio Edition
"A wrong is unredressed when the retribution overtakes its redresser. It is equally unredressed when the avenger fails to make himself felt as such to him who has done the wrong." With this cruel vengeance Montresor, with malicious patience and deceptive friendliness, lured Fortunato into the vault and buried him alive in a niche. The reader knows the target to be doomed and watched the drunken man step deeper into the snare.
As usual, Poe was able to portray the criminal mind, with its unrepentant hatred and cruel delight, as if he were a comrade.
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