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127 Hours 2010

R CC

The true story of mountain climber Aron Ralston's remarkable adventure to save himself after a fallen boulder crashes on his arm and traps him in an isolated canyon in Utah.

Starring:
James Franco, Kate Mara
Runtime:
1 hour, 33 minutes

Available to watch on supported devices.

When renting, you have 30 days to start watching this video, and 48 hours to finish once started.

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When renting, you have 30 days to start watching this video, and 48 hours to finish once started.

Rent Movie HD $3.99
Rent Movie SD $2.99

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Buy Movie HD $12.99
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Product Details

Genres Drama, Thriller, Adventure
Director Danny Boyle
Starring James Franco, Kate Mara
Supporting actors Amber Tamblyn, Sean Bott, Koleman Stinger, Treat Williams, John Lawrence, Kate Burton, Bailee Michelle Johnson, Parker Hadley, Clémence Poésy, Fenton Quinn, Lizzy Caplan, Peter Joshua Hull, Pieter Jan Brugge, Rebecca C. Olson, Jeffrey Wood, Norman Lehnert, Xmas Lutu, Terry S. Mercer
Studio Fox Searchlight
MPAA rating R (Restricted)
Captions and subtitles English Details
Purchase rights Stream instantly Details
Format Amazon Video (streaming online video)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By thornhillatthemovies.com VINE VOICE on November 11, 2010
Format: DVD
"127 Hours", director Danny Boyle's ("Trainspotting", "28 Days Later") follow-up to "Slumdog Millionaire" is a near great film. I honestly can't tell you the last time I was so moved by a piece of celluloid. "127" has created both pleasant and nightmarish memories, memories that will stay with me for many, many years to come.

Aron Ralston (James Franco) quickly grabs some supplies and heads out to his favorite spot, the canyons near Moab, Utah. As soon as the sun rises, he jumps on a mountain bike and heads out to explore and enjoy the great outdoors, heading to a spot some twenty miles away. He crosses paths with two young women, Kristi (Kate Mara) and Megan (Amber Tamblyn) and agrees to show them the way to their destination. Once there, they swim and dive and have fun. After a few hours, they head on to complete their individual journeys. As Aron navigates a narrow crevasse, a small boulder comes loose, causing him to fall and wedging his arm between the wall and the boulder. He can't budge it and becomes worried at the sight of some streaks of blood. Aron takes stock and has very limited food, some water, stretchy cord, a camera, a video camera and a dull knife. Before leaving for the trip, he wasn't able to find his Swiss Army knife, so he is left with a dull give-away promotional knife. He tries to chip away at the sandstone, to move the rock, but doesn't make any progress. Over the next five days and twenty hours, Aron has to figure out how to use the limited supplies he has to survive until he can be rescued. Or, on the other hand, he has to figure out if and how he can get out of this situation on his own.
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Format: Blu-ray
From the macabre paranoia of "Shallow Grave" to the comedic debauchery of "Trainspotting" to the disturbing creepiness of "28 Days Later" to the fanciful romanticism of "Slumdog Millionaire," director Danny Boyle has made kinetic films that really connect to the viewer at a visceral level. Very much a visual stylist, Boyle uses every tool at his disposal--quick cut editing, frantic camera movement, fantasy sequences, jarring music--to really delve into the emotional core of whatever story he is telling. At first glance, "127 Hours" would seem an odd follow-up to the Oscar winning "Slumdog." Stripped down to the most primal level, "127 Hours" is one of the simplest, most straightforward narratives you're likely to encounter. And yet, through the technical bells and whistles and an earnest James Franco performance, you are immersed in a world of madness, desperation, perseverance, hope, struggle and ultimately survival. And there is no denying that this very matter-of-fact tale packs a punch!

Franco plays real-life adventurer Aron Ralston. In 2003, the reckless Ralston set off to explore Utah's Canyonlands National Park. No one knew where he is going and safety was secondary to fun in Ralston's blissed-out commune with nature. While negotiating a crevice, a boulder dislodged and trapped Ralston's arm stranding him in isolation within the earth. The film then documents Ralston's dilemma for the next 127 hours. With limited supplies and no mobility, Boyle makes the most of his claustrophobic environment by inviting us into Ralston's mind. And the primary success of "127 Hours" is that it really traps us within this confined space as well. We're there to the bitter end where survival and sacrifice meet at a crossroads.
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1 Comment 24 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
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Format: DVD
From the macabre paranoia of "Shallow Grave" to the comedic debauchery of "Trainspotting" to the disturbing creepiness of "28 Days Later" to the fanciful romanticism of "Slumdog Millionaire," director Danny Boyle has made kinetic films that really connect to the viewer at a visceral level. Very much a visual stylist, Boyle uses every tool at his disposal--quick cut editing, frantic camera movement, fantasy sequences, jarring music--to really delve into the emotional core of whatever story he is telling. At first glance, "127 Hours" would seem an odd follow-up to the Oscar winning "Slumdog." Stripped down to the most primal level, "127 Hours" is one of the simplest, most straightforward narratives you're likely to encounter. And yet, through the technical bells and whistles and an earnest James Franco performance, you are immersed in a world of madness, desperation, perseverance, hope, struggle and ultimately survival. And there is no denying that this very matter-of-fact tale packs a punch!

Franco plays real-life adventurer Aron Ralston. In 2003, the reckless Ralston set off to explore Utah's Canyonlands National Park. No one knew where he is going and safety was secondary to fun in Ralston's blissed-out commune with nature. While negotiating a crevice, a boulder dislodged and trapped Ralston's arm stranding him in isolation within the earth. The film then documents Ralston's dilemma for the next 127 hours. With limited supplies and no mobility, Boyle makes the most of his claustrophobic environment by inviting us into Ralston's mind. And the primary success of "127 Hours" is that it really traps us within this confined space as well. We're there to the bitter end where survival and sacrifice meet at a crossroads.
Read more ›
1 Comment 30 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
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