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The Iran Job 2013

NR CC
4.8 out of 5 stars (32) IMDb 7.1/10

When American pro basketball player Kevin Sheppard begins playing in Iran, his world turns upside down. During the nation's controversial green revolution, he befriends 3 Iranian women who forever change him.

Starring:
Kevin Sheppard, Eunice Sheppard
Runtime:
1 hour, 35 minutes

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Product Details

Genres Sports, Documentary
Director Till Schauder
Starring Kevin Sheppard, Eunice Sheppard
Supporting actors Leah Sheppard, Gholam Reza Khajeh, Asadollah Kabir, Zoran Majkic, Hilda, Elaheh, Laleh, Ali Doraghi, Kami Jamshidvand, Mehdi Shirjang, Ramin Ahmadi, Waitari Marsh, Hemzel Shimishi, Fereidoon Reisi, Mohammad Ahmadi
Studio Film Movement
MPAA rating NR (Not Rated)
Captions and subtitles English Details
Purchase rights Stream instantly Details
Format Amazon Video (streaming online video)

Other Formats

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: DVD Verified Purchase
The title sounds like some action fiction but this is a documentary and also involves sports. What do you do if you're a good
college basketball player, want to play for a pro team after graduation, but don't get picked up in the US? One option is to play as a member of a professional team in another country. That is the basis of this film: Kevin Sheppard from the US, and a 7 foot tall Serbian player are picked up by the basketball team of Shiraz, Iran which had just made it into the major leagues. Their goal:
make the playoffs--meaning they had to finish at least 8th out of 13 teams, something no other team in Iran's history had done in its first year in the major league. Iran's rules allowed each team to accept 2 foreigners maximum. Sheppard's contract essentially iis that he must get the Shiraz team into the finals, or the contract ends.

It turns out that as he begins, George W. Bush, who called Iran a member of the "Axis of Evil", Is President of the U.S. and considering whether or not to militarily strike as urged by Israel, to inhibit Iran's nuclear reactor program. As the games continue, Obama wins the next election and is sworn in in January, and Iran undergoes its own election, in which Ahmadinejad is seriously challenged by the reform candidate Mir-Hossein Moussavi in 2009, in the so-called "green movement". Ultimately Ahmadinejad was rapidly declared winner by a fairly wide margin, demonstrations break out in Teheran and other large cities, and are rapidly repressed by the police and the revolutionary guards. Moussavi and his wife remain under house arrest. And the Shiraz team...
well, I shouldn't spoil the ending...

Intresting story of two different cultures, seen
up-close from the eyes of an American
basketball player. B+
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Kevin Sheppard's experiences in Iran were utterly fascinating. Kevin's wit and humor made him a great observer of Iranian society. His struggles to raise the game of the team he was hired into was interesting enough, but the backdrop of Iranian society makes this film unique.
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Format: DVD
Great documentary! I really liked that this film offers a glimpse at Iran, at what goes on inside Iranian houses and at the relationships between Iran and the US, something that we do not see enough of outside the news. The people involved are all really lovable and full of life and make the viewing a joyous and interesting experience. Highly recommended!
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Format: DVD
The Iran Job from Director Till Schauder is the latest entry in the Film on Friday series. As with all Film Movement releases, it was an official selection at multiple film festivals.

I watched most of the Winter Olympics - and read of the controversy and upset surrounding what should be a politically neutral event. The Iran Job also uses sports as a platform to explore a politically charged country and its people - in a distinctly different platform. Basketball.

American Kevin Sheppard is a journeyman basketball player - he makes his living playing for overseas teams. When approached to play by a fledgling team in the Iranian Super League, he accepts.

I've heard of the overseas leagues, but to be honest, had no idea that Iran had a league - and loads of avid fans!

Schauder's choice of Sheppard as a focal point of his film was a good choice. Sheppard is extremely engaging. It is this engaging manner that allows him to make friends in a time and place that is not US friendly. While it is fascinating to watch the basketball team, it is the people that allow themselves to be filmed as they talk openly to Sheppard that were the stars. Kevin makes friends with three young Iranian women and they share their thoughts about and hopes for their country. Sheppard's interactions with his teammates, apartment building superintendent, roommate, shopkeepers and more kept me engaged for the full 95 minutes. Schauder's film gave me a look at everyday Iran -a change from the nightly news stories. An excellent documentary well worth watching. (With a great soundtrack) English and Farsi with subtitles. 95 minutes.

As always, Film Movement includes a bonus short film. City Bomber is also from Till Schauder.
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Format: DVD
...and who knew that Iran had it's own professional basketball leagues?

For a generation plus, Iran (generally), its theocratic (or just plain belligerent) political leaders and Iranians (generally) have served as a bogeyman to the the West (and also for Israel and various Arab states).

"The Iran Job" follows the journey of Kevin Sheppard from his home in the US Virgin Islands to a stint with the newest member of Iran's "Super" basketball league, A.S. Shiraz based in that southwestern Iranian city. Sheppard played college hoops at Jacksonville University. Unable to break into the NBA, A.S. Shiraz is the next stop on an overseas professional career that has taken him to other foreign leagues (including China, Isreal and Brazil). Along with Zoran (a Serb), he is one of the two foreign players permitted on each Super League team.

This documentary is very little about basketball and mostly about the meeting --and sometimes the clash-- of cultures. A trip to sports medicine clinic places Sheppard in contact with three Iranian women who chafe at many of the cultural, political and religious conventions of their life. Directors Till Shchauder and Sara Nodjoumi go easy on the political commentary, and let the facts speak for themselves. They do this through images captured in the streets of Shiraz, and through the mouths of American media and political figures (this takes place through the end of the 2008 campaign and through inauguration).

While interesting and deserving illumination, I was surprised at Sheppard's decisions to not only sustain contact with these women, but to also offer them alcohol.
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