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We Are What We Are

2013

R CC

In WE ARE WHAT WE ARE, a seemingly wholesome and benevolent family, the Parkers have always kept to themselves, and for good reason. Behind closed doors, patriarch Frank rules his family with a rigorous fervor, determined to keep his ancestral customs intact at any cost.

Starring:
Kassie Wesley DePaiva, Laurent Rejto
Runtime:
1 hour, 45 minutes

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Product Details

Genres Drama, Thriller, Horror
Director Jim Mickle
Starring Kassie Wesley DePaiva, Laurent Rejto
Supporting actors Julia Garner, Ambyr Childers, Jack Gore, Bill Sage, Kelly McGillis, Wyatt Russell, Michael Parks, Annemarie Lawless, Traci Hovel, Nat DeWolf, Nick Damici, Vonia Arslanian, Larry Fessenden, Odeya Rush, Joel Nagle, Reagan Leonard, I.N. Sierros, Tyler Barden
Studio Entertainment One
MPAA rating R (Restricted)
Captions and subtitles English Details
Purchase rights Stream instantly Details
Format Amazon Video (streaming online video)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By J. Isaacs on February 3, 2014
Format: Amazon Video Verified Purchase
This film will not be for everyone. Some might find it slow, others will sense the tension building. You might think you know what is going to happen but you don't. This is such a bizarre combination of indie film art and offbeat horror. I don't how else to describe it. I enjoyed it but was definitely macabre.
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Horror movies about cannibals have been a staple since Tobe Hooper took a big bite out of the genre with 1974's The Texas Chainsaw Massacre. That micro-budget indie set the basic pattern for a score of sequels, remakes, and imitations: An inbred, monosyllabic sub-Mensa family - with a penchant for making masks and lampshades with human skin - trap, kill, and cook unwitting teenagers.

The Silence of the Lambs gave us an articulate, Euro-suave gourmand cannibal, but served up pretty much the same stew.

There's nothing formulaic about We Are What We Are, a brilliant, deeply disturbing religious allegory about an otherwise normal family in rural, upstate New York who subscribe to a generations-old belief that they will die if they don't consume human flesh.

Loosely adapted from Mexican director Jorge Michel Grau's stunning 2010 shocker, We Are What We Are is the third feature from indie wunderkind Jim Mickle, who breathed new life into the vampire genre with 2010's equally riveting, innovative Stake Land.

An American Gothic yarn about the power of tradition, ritual, and sacrifice to bind a clan together, We Are What We Are doesn't waste time with cheap scares. Mickle keeps his story on a steady, slow simmer, transporting us minute by minute into the very heart of dread.

Ambyr Childers (Tee Master) and Julia Garner (Martha Marcy May Marlene) give deeply moving performances as teenage sisters Iris and Rose Parker, who find themselves the heads of the family when their mother is accidentally killed in a violent storm.

Their father, Frank (Bill Sage), expects them to take up their mother's mantle and initiate their clan's generations-old ritual of preparing, sacrificing, and consuming another human being.
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Format: DVD Verified Purchase
First let me say the only reason I bought this movie is because it has Kassie Depaiva in it. I try to buy any movies I can that have "ex-One Life To Livers" in it. Kassie is my favorite. The movie is good. Kind of creepy. But it makes you think a little. Like, Are there people out there like that? There probably are somewhere. It's Better than a lot of movies I have seen lately with all the hoopla. All the actors were good. Lots of talent in this movie. I would say "try it you'll like it", but that would probably date me wouldn't it? Wish Kassie would have had a bigger part. I should say "more screen time".. To add a side note, ... The person who gave the go ahead to cancel One Life To Live is an idiot! Who needs another "reality-cooking-blab-fest-talk show?"
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Format: DVD
We Are What We Are (Jim Mickle, 2013)

Less than a minute into Jim Mickle's reimagining—one cannot call it a remake with a straight face—of Jorge Grau's fine 2010 film Somos lo que Hay, he has already made it plain to the viewer who has seen the previous film that We Are What We Are is a different movie indeed. The two movies start with the same event; the death of the head of a family. While that death is never explained in the 2010 film (the family gets a visit from the coroner about two-thirds of the way through this version with a cause of death, not that it matters), the two of them are virtually identical in the method in which each family member dies; it starts with a nosebleed, descends quickly into convulsions, and within seconds that person has shuffled off this mortal coil. It is the circumstances surrounding the two deaths that make all the difference. When Papa does in the 2010 film, he is in a large city. He is surrounded by people, yet he is utterly alone and anonymous. (One of the movie's finest, funniest, blackest scenes is the revelation of what happens to him after his death, which takes place in the following minute or so.) In the 2013 film, Emma Parker (Evil Dead II's Kassie DePaiva) is trying to beat a coming storm in a small backwoods town somewhere in Appalachia, frantically grabbing groceries, but still managing to have time to have a conversation with the clerk at the general store. (Yes, this town is small enough to still have a general store.) In the space of a couple of minutes, Jim Mickle has changed the sex of the dying parent and the type of city in which the family lives. This should be creating a string of “what if?”s in the head of any viewer who has seen the original movie. It is to Jim Mickle (Mulberry St.
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The three stars is for the remake with Ambyr Childers and Julia Garner, I watched that about a year ago but I got Shudder as an add-on and was presented with the 2010 Mexican version. I wish they would fix this and the aforementioned audio de syncing, I watched it as I had already finished most of the film and wanted to see the end. I see it hasn't been fixed since the last review mentioning it.
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Format: DVD
The Parkers are a small-town and seemingly wholesome rural family but they harbor a dark secret. The father, Frank Parker, rules the family consisting of teenage daughters Rose and Iris, and young son Rory, with a puritanical dedication to his family’s legacy. That legacy, dating back to the 1700s, includes the murder and consuming the body of their victim in an annual feast just as any other family would celebrate Thanksgiving.

When Frank’s wife passes away, the responsibly of assisting him with killing the victims now falls to eldest daughter Iris. But she and Rose are hesitant, desiring only to be normal teenagers. As they prepare themselves for their ghoulish feast, the local doctor begins unraveling the clues that will reveal their cannibalistic legacy and lead him to discover what happened to his own daughter who went missing.

We Are What We Are is a slow moving film and despite its subject matter it is extremely light on blood and gore. The film was directed by Jim Mickle who directed the excellent 2010 vampire film “Stake Land”. Like that film, this one also relies heavily on characterization and atmosphere. To that end he employs much of the same cast and crew including actors Kelly McGillis and Nick Damici, Cinematographer Ryan Samul, and composer Jeff Grace. The film has the same somber and often gloomy tone as Stake Land. The killing and eating of the body isn’t done for gruesome effect but rather as a reluctant but respectful almost religious observance of a family tradition. Thus the film never becomes over the top. Might be too slow moving for some horror fans and runs a tad too long but all in all and interesting and very different type of horror film.
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