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The Face of Love 2014

PG-13 CC

Annette Bening stars as a widow who falls in love with a man (Ed Harris) who looks exactly like her deceased husband in this moving romantic drama. Also stars Robin Williams.

Starring:
Annette Bening, Ed Harris
Runtime:
1 hour, 32 minutes

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Product Details

Genres Drama, Romance
Director Arie Posin
Starring Annette Bening, Ed Harris
Supporting actors Robin Williams, Jess Weixler, Linda Park, Jeffrey Vincent Parise, Horacio Cerutti, Amy Brenneman, Clyde Kusatsu, Eli Vargas, Miguel Perez, Yuki Bird, Kim Farris, Christopher Haskell, Christian Mendez, Deana Molle', Chelsea O'Connor, Susana Rodriguez, Gregory Schott, Leah Shaw
Studio IFC Films
MPAA rating PG-13 (Parents Strongly Cautioned)
Captions and subtitles English Details
Purchase rights Stream instantly Details
Format Amazon Video (streaming online video)

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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By K. Harris HALL OF FAMETOP 100 REVIEWER on July 15, 2014
Format: DVD
It is both sad and a little crazy that a movie headlined by Annette Bening, Ed Harris and Robin Williams could fly so completely under the radar as "The Face of Love." Truthfully, I could watch Bening in almost anything and Harris has long since proven to be one of our most reliable character actors. Their pairing is the primary reason to check out this endeavor by writer/director Arie Posin (with a co-writing credit going to Matthew McDuffie). I was a fan of Posin's earlier film effort, "The Chumscrubber," with its over-the-top portrait of suburban unrest. Here, though, he goes for something distinctly more earnest and heartfelt. The result, despite nice performances, is terribly uneven. Bening makes the most of her character and she and Harris have chemistry to spare, but the movie never decides exactly what it wants to be. Is it a heartfelt romance? Or maybe a portrait of obsessive love? The screenplay hedges it bets and wants it both ways. So what might have been searing and memorable character study leaves many of its most important moments off screen. It is still watchable, to be sure, it just never quite fulfills its promise.

Bening plays a widow still lamenting the death of her husband after five years. Disconnected from life, she is still supposedly a successful house stager and neither time or money is ever an issue. I love how affluent people are the only ones that ever have the time in movies to grieve. When she sees a man who looks just like her deceased husband (Harris), she becomes obsessed with tracking him down. You'd think this might be complicated in Los Angeles, but Bening meets the challenge head-on with little problem. When the two get together, he quickly becomes enamored of her despite the fact that she falls apart at their first meeting.
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Format: Amazon Video Verified Purchase
The story, unbelievable as it was, felt so very true. I could watch these two characters endlessly because what they had between them affected me. The movie felt like a stirring poem. It was quiet but intense, too. Bening and Harris were good together and Robin Williams was better than I have seen him in a long time. If you like movies that go for the heart and mind, you really might like this.
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Format: Amazon Video
Nikki's (Annette Bening) husband, Garrett, is portrayed by a semi facially-altered Ed Harris in a dual role. He has passed away after thirty years of marriage to a now heartbroken Nikki. She took each and every bit of his belongings and all reminders away from their home, as the pain of seeing them was too much for Nikki to bear. The story moves ahead five years in modern day Los Angeles with its lovely Art Museum and city shots (photography by Antonio Riestra). All through the present days her memory goes back in time and relives the memories she had with him right to their hideaway in Mexico. She and Garrett have a grown daughter, Summer (Jess Weixler), who is living away from home. Nikki's neighbor across the street, Roger, portrayed by Robin Williams, doesn't share much screen time but is effective in his role and an interesting character in the movie. Williams has a shy charm and a slightly possessive regard for the 'possibility' of Nikki as a relationship in time, or is just envious of how strong her love with Garrett had been. Besides being a friend to Nikki for so long, they share the fact that their spouses have passed away and have this in common. I feel that the role of Roger is involved in the story to show that one friend has gone through the grief process while the other has not, or has gotten lost along the way.

Tom (Harris, again) then appears to an astounded Nikki; his exact double, a doppelganger right in front of her eyes? Was I supposed to suspend all of my disbelief for this to play out for me? Not usually being very critical, I decided to go with the flow here and what this story did for me was become a suspenseful challenge that actually ended up winning me over. While I felt that there was not too much in the character building for Garrett beforehand.
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So extremely moving, but in a more subtle way, a way that only those who have endured the deep loss of a deep love. Yes it is a romance and it is not, It is about the human need for the love it knows & understands. The great depths to which we need love, but in the way we know - how love is pulled into place through our experiences with it. It is about bereavement and the movements, denials, small lies and great lengths one will go through to get to those places of feeling relief or any comfort - To BE "out of" the pain, & instead IN that feeling of "living" we feel with love. It is a "FACE", most certainly love is a face; like a fingerprint or a snowflake, unique. Human love wants what it knows, healthy or not, functional or not. Love is subjective. This movie is a work of art in telling the story of loss, need, love,and individual coping. Beautifully acted, authentic. The contradiction, the confusion, the withholding of parts of ourselves - well..... This Is LIFE! This is life indeed. It does not make sense for the most part. It is convoluted, complicated, but crafted carefully in this representation, to not come off as boggy, painful or even ridiculous. I got it! For me it made sense and I understood the "why" even though not one of the characters was like me or even came close to my exact experiences. It does translate. If you watch this, you must be open to the translation
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