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The Anthropocene Reviewed: Essays on a Human-Centered Planet by [John Green]
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The Anthropocene Reviewed: Essays on a Human-Centered Planet Kindle Edition

4.8 out of 5 stars 3,241 ratings

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From the Publisher

More from John Green

____________

Turtles All the Way Down The Fault in Our Stars Looking for Alaska John Green: The Complete Collection Box Set
Turtles All the Way Down The Fault in Our Stars Looking for Alaska John Green: The Complete Collection Box Set
Aza is living within the ever-tightening spiral of her own thoughts. Told with shattering, unflinching clarity, this is a brilliant exploration of love, resilience, and the power of lifelong friendship. “The greatest romance story of this decade.” Hazel and Augustus meet at support group for teens with cancer. Last words and first loves at boarding school. John Green’s award-winning, genre-defining debut. The deluxe 5-book set is the definitive collection of John Green’s critically acclaimed fiction.

Editorial Reviews

Review

Praise for The Anthropocene Reviewed

The Anthropocene Reviewed is the perfect book to read over lunch or to keep on your nightstand, whenever you need a reminder of what it is to feel small and human, in the best possible way.” –San Francisco Chronicle

“There is something of the sermon in [Green’s] essays as he mixes curiosity and erudition with confession, compassion, and wit, searching for illuminating life lessons amid life’s dark chaos. His particular mix of irony and sincerity enables him to embrace both the sublime and the ridiculous.” –Booklist

Lyrical and beautiful, funny and hopeful, intricate and entertaining all at once.... Green may have made his name by writing fiction (and for good reason), but this first foray into nonfiction is his most mature, compelling, and beautifully written book yet.” –Shondaland.com
 
“What Green is really telling us with these unexpected stories about Sycamore Trees, Canada Geese, and Dr Pepper is how much there is to love in the world and why that love is worth the effort.” –NPR.com

“Each short review is rich with meaning and filled with surprises and together, they amount to a resonant paean to hard-won hope.” –Publishers Weekly, starred review

“In his novels, John Green conjures richly imagined, heartfelt drama that lovingly explores the human condition. With The Anthropocene Reviewed, John pulls off the same magic trick while writing about the largest ball of paint...and it is glorious. Every page is full of insight. I loved it.” –Roman Mars, creator and host of 99% Invisible

The Anthropocene Reviewed somehow satisfies all the contradictory demands I have for a book right now: it stimulates my brain while getting me out of my head while taking me to faraway places while grounding me in the wonders of my everyday. I’m so glad it’s here. I need it.” –Anna Sale, host of Death, Sex & Money and author of Let’s Talk About Hard Things

If loving something out loud takes courage, and I think it does, John Green is Evel Knievel and The Anthropocene Reviewed is a series of ever-more-impressive motorcycle jumps.” –Latif Nasser, co-host of Radiolab

About the Author

John Green is the award-winning, #1 bestselling author of books including Looking for Alaska, The Fault in Our Stars, and Turtles All the Way Down. His books have received many accolades, including a Printz Medal, a Printz Honor, and an Edgar Award. John has twice been a finalist for the LA Times Book Prize and was selected by TIME magazine as one of the 100 Most Influential People in the World. He is also the writer and host of the critically acclaimed podcast The Anthropocene Reviewed. With his brother, Hank, John has co-created many online video projects, including Vlogbrothers and the educational channel Crash Course. He lives with his family in Indianapolis, Indiana. You can visit John online at johngreenbooks.com. --This text refers to an alternate kindle_edition edition.

Product details

  • ASIN ‏ : ‎ B08GJVLGGX
  • Publisher ‏ : ‎ Dutton (May 18, 2021)
  • Publication date ‏ : ‎ May 18, 2021
  • Language ‏ : ‎ English
  • File size ‏ : ‎ 8449 KB
  • Text-to-Speech ‏ : ‎ Enabled
  • Enhanced typesetting ‏ : ‎ Enabled
  • X-Ray ‏ : ‎ Enabled
  • Word Wise ‏ : ‎ Enabled
  • Print length ‏ : ‎ 302 pages
  • Lending ‏ : ‎ Not Enabled
  • Customer Reviews:
    4.8 out of 5 stars 3,241 ratings

Customer reviews

4.8 out of 5 stars
4.8 out of 5
3,241 global ratings
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Top reviews from the United States

Reviewed in the United States on May 18, 2021
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5.0 out of 5 stars Full Stars for signature, book is lovely as well.
By Bethany M. W. on May 18, 2021
Underrated signature. Written in green sharpie, the name John stands out in it’s simplicity and implication of the last name through color.
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68 people found this helpful
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Reviewed in the United States on May 19, 2021
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49 people found this helpful
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Reviewed in the United States on May 18, 2021
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5.0 out of 5 stars The Reviewer has become the Reviewee!
By C on May 18, 2021
Anyone that has read this book, or is familiar with the podcast, will see the humor in having to give the book a rating on a five-star scale!

This is an insightful, thought-provoking, funny, and sometimes emotional collection of short essays about various random topics that John Green has decided to write about over the past couple years. There are about 45 individual essays, and in each one Green briefly discusses an idea or topic and how it has affected him. Each essay then ends with a “review” rating of that subject on a five-star scale. For example, Sunsets received 5 stars, while Canada Geese only received 2 stars. The format makes it feel somewhat like a witty but thoughtful series of blog posts, and it is easy to read a few essays and then pause and come back later. The topics are pretty random and varied, they do not flow naturally into each other.

Green makes some great points, and the format of the book with the star ratings really adds to the humor of this collection. As someone who has written many reviews, I appreciated the absurdity of having to assign a star rating to “Whispering” or “Sycamore Trees.” Overall this was very easy to read, but not something that you need to finish in one sitting.

The signed edition has Green's signature on the first page in green marker, with a little explanation about why he wanted to include his signature. (see picture)

I give Green's Anthropocene Reviewed..... Five Stars!
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33 people found this helpful
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Reviewed in the United States on May 18, 2021
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23 people found this helpful
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Reviewed in the United States on May 19, 2021
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21 people found this helpful
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Reviewed in the United States on May 19, 2021
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17 people found this helpful
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Reviewed in the United States on May 18, 2021
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20 people found this helpful
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Reviewed in the United States on May 19, 2021
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Top reviews from other countries

Epettz
5.0 out of 5 stars Read this book
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on August 12, 2021
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liz
5.0 out of 5 stars Worth a read!
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on July 2, 2021
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One person found this helpful
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J. Atherton
5.0 out of 5 stars Great book
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on August 7, 2021
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Aadil Naik
5.0 out of 5 stars Reigniting curiosity and seeing beauty in the mundane
Reviewed in India on July 1, 2021
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5.0 out of 5 stars Reigniting curiosity and seeing beauty in the mundane
Reviewed in India on July 1, 2021
The Anthropocene Reviewed is an odd book to define, but very easy to recommend. It’s a collection of essays delving not merely into the things John has seen through his life, but spending copious amounts of time on all the thoughts that those experiences birthed. It’s random. It’s inspirational. But most importantly, it is incredibly thought provoking, heart warming and calming. It reminds us to see what’s in front of us, and what’s in front of us is beautiful. It’s a review and a unique insight of modern civilisation. And bring short 5-10min essays, it makes for easy reading.

Green artfully spends time in the origins of things, because it really does add perspective. And these are things we take for granted, never wondering about the unique circumstances that birthed them. From the invention of air conditioning (did you know it’s first use was for a printing press?) to the first grocery store to have aisles and self service, Green is masterful in how he makes it a story.

He effortlessly switches between essays on uncommon- but general- topics like Nathan’s Hot Dog Eating competition and daily topics we just don’t think about, like sunsets. But then he also writes about topics very specific to his life experience, like the movie Penguins of Madagascar. But what truly sets all of these apart is unlike a newscaster, he does more than merely narrate facts. He adds non-general insight and inference of a deeply personal nature; of how he sees it, and the value it has added to him and his thoughts, and this is where the book truly shines, because John effortlessly walks the fine line between being an individual and being a member of a collective species.

While the insights are personal opinions, none of them are myopic or only relevant to his life’s experiences. They zoom out all the way, to view it as a human experience, what it means for us as a culture and what it could mean for the future.

The underlying tone throughout is one of immense gratitude and appreciation for life (human and otherwise) and the experiences that are a part of it, with a healthy dose of caution to avoid the mistakes of the past.

Above all, though, I think John Green, through this book, exemplifies one core characteristic of humanity- curiosity. We are all born inherently curious, but then have it beaten out of us through our education systems, capitalism and the myth that careers are THE most important thing in life, and everything else must be rendered a lesser priority. In such a society, the importance of curiosity is greatly diminished, which is tragic. The essays in this book, though, cover such a myriad of topics, that one truly can’t help but marvel at not just the author’s breadth of interests, but how you, the reader are suddenly just as interested in all these random things. It’s also a testament to the fact that there remain sooo many intriguing and interesting things in the world. Some are admittedly very obscure but most are littered in the things we see and do on a daily- if only we choose to look at them a little deeper.

The Anthropocene Reviewed, then, is a hard book to define. It’s about the world. It’s about events. It’s about the past, and it informs about the future. And it’s been written in a style that has so far left me very intrigued, in a very good way. John’s mastery of narration is unlike any I’ve come across. His writing is the only one that consistently moves me to actual tears, through its propensity to connect on a deeply emotional and visual level. I still don’t understand how he does it. I dream of being able to write like him, and having the same emotional and mental connect he does with his readers.

In conclusion, if there was ever a book that reminds us of what means to be alive- truly alive- then this is it. The book also feels like it’ll age very well. It will still be relevant years later, and it’s one of those that you can read repeatedly ever so often.

So, as John Green would say, ‘I give the Anthropocene Reviewed a solid 5 stars’
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10 people found this helpful
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Lauren Fish
5.0 out of 5 stars Well of course
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on August 2, 2021
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