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Showing 1-10 of 1,017 reviews(Verified Purchases). See all 1,103 reviews
on May 1, 2015
This hand strap technically does fit my Nikon D5300, but when it is attached you cannot open the LCD screen. The base of the strap has a plastic flap that comes up and blocks the screen from opening. The flap tightens really hard against the screen itself when I have it flipped so the LCD is facing outward and I'm really afraid that the flap is going to scratch the glass. This right here is a deal breaker for me.
Also, as a girl with slender hands, even when the strap is tightened all the way it is still very loose and my hand easily slips out.
This hand strap may work with other camera models, but I do not recommend it for the Nikon D5300. I also do not recommend it for anyone with slender hands.
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on November 22, 2013
With this costing me under $4, I was sure this was going to be a waste of time and money. I was pleasantly surprised to find that this is genuinely a bargain, fairly well made and a lot more handy than the standard neck strap. I put it on a Nikon D7000 and liked it so much that I bought a second one for a D200.

The strap screws to the tripod mount on the bottom of the camera. The connection at this end is very secure. It is necessary to unscrew the strap to get access to the battery, but this operation is much less laborious than I expected. The top part of the strap passes through the eyelet on the side of the camera. I thought it might have a tendency to come loose or part company entirely with the eyelet, but after 2,000 shots and no problems, I have a lot more confidence in the strap.

In point of fact, this strap makes it much easier to move around in framing shots, since I can easily hold the camera securely with one hand. No more chest banging from trying to use a neck strap.

Construction is fairly sound. I had expected the stitching to be coming loose by now, but it hasn't. It also takes up minimal space. I can still get the D7000 into a Case Logic holster without difficulty. And of course, the strap has a certain cool factor, since people even more amateur than me look at the strap and conclude that I must know what I'm doing. All this, and for less than $4.
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Enthusiast: Photographyon November 21, 2016
The item is fairly decent and I'm giving it 5 stars only because of the very low price (under five dollars shipped). I also have the original canon E1 grip and this one is not as nice. First, I should probably mention that I'm using it with a "gripped" body (a DSLR with a vertical battery grip attached), so I had to remove the hard plastic base and just use the vinyl pad and the ribbon. The back (inside) of the pad is rubberized and some may prefer it that way (for extra grip) but I personally don't like it as I don't need excessive friction at my fingers and it makes it hard to put on and take off. Also, the pad is stiffer and it doesn't conform to the hand as well as the E1-s soft leather. The buckle is fixed to one end, which limits the versatility, while the E1 has an opening in the middle of the pad and you can run the ribbon's ends there and attach the open buckle there.
Overall, it does the job well and is a good way to add support to the DSLR, without having a neck strap interfere with your movements. It fits bodies from a Rebel T3i with the BG-E8 to a 7D Mark II with the BG-E16.
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on September 2, 2016
I've used this for over 2 years and about 100,000 images shot in all conditions and all terrains, mostly while hiking. It's solid enough I feel comfortable relying on it to hold my nikon d7100 plus the 300-500 f/5.6 (a beast of a lens). So it's definitely heavy duty. My one complaint is that it tends to roll up and flip over when I put my hand through it. If I use two hands I can get it set right so that it's comfortable, but I don't always have the time or luxury to do that. Perhaps a different material? IDK, but that's my only real complaint.

Update: while still functional and trusted to carry my camera's weight, the pad has worn completely through, the foam has fallen out and now the whole thing needs to be replaced. I'll be trying a different grip strap next time, this one seems to be good for maybe 18 months or so. I like this grip, I just wish it were made better.
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I had a very specific use for this and understood that for the D5200, it might not be the "perfect fit". I use an external battery grip that has a strap loop, so the "perfect fit" issue others have talked about isn't an issue for me. It fits fine. That means if you have an external battery pack that has a strap loop built in, you can dump the attachment piece on this and just attach the strap straight to the camera and battery grip. I also recommend you do this because the attachment that comes with this grip is somewhat thick and adds to the overall thickness of using it as intended on the bottom of the battery grip.

There's a tab that needs to be removed if one is going to attach this to the D5200, D5300 or any other SLR camera with a swing-out screen so that it doesn't get in the way of the screen and prevent it from deploying. It's a generic camera strap meant to fit many different models of camera, most of which do NOT have a swing-out screen.

The tab that prevents the screen from coming out is easily filed down with an emery board or file, or sawed off using a small saw or rotary tool with a cut-off wheel. And for the price and the quality, a few minutes of extra effort are well worth the time. For cameras without a swing-out screen, it's going to do extremely well.

Beyond the tab issue, it will fit very large hands with no problem. It tightens down against the hand with no slippage and allows the photographer enough flexibility to alter settings or make adjustments to the shot without having to remove your hand. It may make your had sweat more in hot weather, but it does maintain a good grip.

The down-side is that the padding tends to move around a bit more than I'd like it to. That varies the grip placement a bit from use to use. When working by touch, that can be problematic. With no way to set the pad in one place once the optimal position is found, one does have to play with it a bit at the start of each use. If you're reaching for a spur-of-the-moment shot and the camera isn't already positions, you might miss it.

I'll probably come up with a work-around for that later. For the most part, it does the job and for the price, it's a good deal.
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on July 19, 2015
Bought this strap for my Nikon D5200 knowing that the tab would restrict the LCD screen from opening. Got a razor knife and cut the tab off in 2 minutes. Very easy fix for a high quality strap. Haw recommended it to friends with d3200 and they did the same thing I did. VERY SIMPLE FIX.
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on June 3, 2016
I tried this on my Canon Rebel T6s and it 'should have worked'. One problem with the Rebel is the battery compartment was covered but by loosing up the mounting screw you could slide the platform enough to insert a battery without undoing the bottom part completely. My serious complaint is I don't trust it. One end of the strap where it loops around the buckle is permanently sown so there is only one way to feed the loose strap and that's over the top where there is little friction. Wiggle the hand a bit and it all becomes loose. Nope my camera cost too much to trust this thing. At the low price I paid I'll just toss it and move on. The other issue that I suspected would happen is I can't use the Canon neck strap while the grip is attached.
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on January 3, 2016
Poor design! Does not fit D5100! Do not waste your money on this product. The picture shows how a tab from this product blocks the screen from going back to its slot. If you close the screen and then attach the grip then it would not fit snug and seems to put pressure on the edge of the screen.

Some answers and reviews suggested it fits D5100 but that is misleading. It fits but makes it not usable. Also another flaw is that it cant be used with shoulder strap. Only one of shoulder strap or hand grip can be used at a time.
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on May 19, 2016
The product looks great. It was priced right. Problem is that it does not work.

It installs very easy and the base plate holds securely. The strap however is the problem and since it's the whole point, well I suggest you look elsewhere. The strap does not hold tension so when you put it on, it loosens around your hand to the point of why bother.

No matter how I tried to use the product, the strap just kept loosening and quite frankly I was afraid to use it on a shoot in fear that I would lose (drop) the camera.

The stitching of the pad also started to unravel on the second day.

Cheap, ineffective, and poorly made.

This product should come with camera insurance....you'll need it
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on March 14, 2015
The strap isn't at the right angle for comfort on my D3100, because the mount makes the strap fit straight up-and-down (just like shown in the sales-picture) on my hand. That position works okay if you want to take a "vertical" portrait with your right-hand above your head (versus typical "horizontal" landscape). But, for a landscape-shot, as you bring the camera up to your eye, the bottom of the palm of your hand needs to drop-down and roll-forward (toward the lens) to hold/operate the camera properly. It's unfortunate the bottom-holder for the strap doesn't come out the front of the camera, and you can't really swing the mount forward to make that happen.

Right idea, but wrong execution.
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