Amazon Vehicles Oct16 Amazon Fashion nav_sap_plcc_ascpsc Electronics Holiday Gift Guide Starting at $39.99 Subscribe & Save Cozy Knits STEM Book 2 or More Hours of House Cleaning on Amazon bajillions bajillions bajillions  All-New Echo Dot Starting at $89.99 All-New Kindle for Kids Edition Leonard Cohen Shop Cycling on Amazon

Soylent Green



This is the year 2022. Overcrowding, pollution, and resource depletion have reduced society's leaders to finding food for the teeming masses. The answer is Soylent Green.

Charlton Heston, Leigh Taylor-Young
1 hour, 36 minutes

Available to watch on supported devices.

When renting, you have 30 days to start watching this video, and 24 hours to finish once started.

Rent Movie SD $2.99
Buy Movie SD $7.99
Prime and purchased videos can be watched on supported devices, including the Fire Phone and the Amazon app for Android phones. 
By placing your order, you agree to our Terms of Use. Sold by Amazon Digital Services LLC. Additional taxes may apply.

Product Details

Genres Science Fiction, Thriller, Mystery
Director Richard Fleischer
Starring Charlton Heston, Leigh Taylor-Young
Supporting actors Chuck Connors, Joseph Cotten, Brock Peters, Paula Kelly, Edward G. Robinson, Stephen Young, Mike Henry, Lincoln Kilpatrick, Roy Jenson, Leonard Stone, Whit Bissell, Celia Lovsky, Dick Van Patten, Morgan Farley, John Barclay, Belle Mitchell, Cyril Delevanti, Forrest Wood
Studio Warner Bros.
MPAA rating PG (Parental Guidance Suggested)
Captions and subtitles English Details
Purchase rights Stream instantly Details
Format Amazon Video (streaming online video)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By Robert Beveridge HALL OF FAMEVINE VOICE on February 15, 2001
Format: VHS Tape
Soylent Green (Richard Fleischer, 1973)

So what's the difference between schlock and one of the 100 best films ever made? Sometimes, I'll admit, it's a pretty blurry line. That's the case with this gem from the Richard Fleischer stable, a tale of a New York City with a population of forty million and a food supply that comes in little squares of red, yellow, and green.

Thorn (Heston) chews scenery. Roth (Edward G. Robinson) spends his life moaning about how things were better in the seventies. (If only they knew.) The two of them try to get through their lives scavenging from the rich, like everyone else in New York. They have an edge, with Thorn being a cop who treats corruption like a confortable pair of undershorts. A high society murder tips Thorn off that all may not be well with Soylent, the company that makes the majority of the world's food supply, and Thorn and Roth start digging deeper deapite warnings from the victim's old bodyguard (Stephen Young) and Thorn's lieutanant (Brock Peters). The production values are strictly seventies, and it's great to poke fun at various things in the film ("my god, it's 2022 and they're still listening to bad lounge music?"). And yet there's something undefinable about this film that propels it from the realm of bad seventies science-fiction exploitation into the realm of true genius. What that thing is, I don't know; when I figure it out, I'll tell you. But something clicked. Heston's patented god-guns-and-guts character is perfect for the role. Robinson actually looks convincing salivating over a stick of celery. And somehow the movie's last lines are delivered convincingly. It's incredible. Whatever magic they managed to make with this one, Hollywood needs to make more of it. **** 1/2
11 Comments 331 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
In the year 2022, the greenhouse effect has poisoned the Earth. The world is grossly overpopulated and there are practically no natural food sources left. Vendors in the street markets sell Soylent Red and Soylent yellow (made from soybeans), but the Government controls and hands out rations of Soylent Green on Tuesdays. Supposedly made from high-energy plankton, Soylent Green is often in short supply for the high demand. People stand in food lines all day waiting for water and processed foodstuffs. Real food is unheard of.

Detective Robert Thorn (Charlton Heston) lives in a tiny, seedy apartment with his "book", Sol Roth (Edward G. Robinson). A "book" is like an assistant, picking and assigning cases and performing research. To reach the streets, he must step over the dozens of homeless bodies camped out on the stairs of the apartment. Sol assigns Thorn the homicide case of William R. Simonson (Joseph Cotton). Simonson lives in a posh apartment complex complete with "furniture", which includes a woman. His "furniture's" name is Shirl. Shirl and Simonson's bodyguard Tab Fielding (Chuck Conners) were out shopping when the murder occurred inside the apartment. (Check out Shirl's "new" video game)

The murder is a puzzle to Thorn, who believes Simonson wasn't just murdered but assassinated. He steals two books from Simonson and has Sol research them. (He also steals real food, booze, soap, a towel, paper, and pencils - items not available to the general public) When Thorn finds out Simonson was the director of Soylent and friend to Governor Santini, his chief attempts to pull him off the case and close it. But there's too much mystery surrounding the murder, and Thorn refuses to give up until he solves the puzzle of Simonson and the secrets of Soylent.
Read more ›
1 Comment 139 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: VHS Tape
Soylent Green is one of those films that, as soon as I saw it, I wondered where had it been all my life? I though it was great, and made a point of telling all my friends about it.
It's based on Harry Harrison's book "Make Room, Make Room!", which is itself half story/half documentary about over-population and environmental damage. The film uses the environmental disaster the world has become, and the resultant starvation, as a kind of backdrop, while the main story, it seems, is simply about a murder being investigated by Charlton Heston.
The film very cleverly shows you all the realities of living in that bleak world by the way Heston brilliantly takes all sorts of terrible situations totally in his stride. As he leaves his apartment, he has to step over people sleeping on the steps; the air outside is murky and has a faint green glow; even though he's a detective, he sometimes has to get involved in food riot control and only has a helmet for protection; he has to recharge his apartment's batteries using a bicycle; his watch keeps breaking, but no-one is making new ones anymore. Similar small touches abound throughout the film, and taken together have a deep impact on you as you think about them after the film.
Edward G. Robinson, in his last performance, plays Heston's partner, whose speciality is information and where to get it. He's an old man, and, finally, despair at the state of the world gets to him. His ultimate fate, the murder that Heston is investigating, and the environmental hell all around them, are all brought together right at the end, in a gripping finale. As the horrible truth dawns upon Heston, he cries out the answer: a four word phrase that encapsulates the horror of the world all about them.
Read more ›
1 Comment 92 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse