Automotive Deals BOTYSFKT Shop Women's Clothing Learn more nav_sap_plcc_ascpsc $5 Albums Fire TV Stick Sun Care Handmade school supplies Shop-by-Room Amazon Cash Back Offer harmonquest_s1 harmonquest_s1 harmonquest_s1  Amazon Echo  Echo Dot  Amazon Tap  Echo Dot  Amazon Tap  Amazon Echo Starting at $49.99 All-New Kindle Oasis STEM Segway miniPro

Amelia 2009

PG CC

A look at the life of legendary American pilot Amelia Earhart, who disappeared while flying over the Pacific Ocean in 1937 in an attempt to make a flight around the world.

Starring:
Hilary Swank, Richard Gere
Runtime:
1 hour, 51 minutes

Available to watch on supported devices.

When renting, you have 30 days to start watching this video, and 48 hours to finish once started.

Rent Movie HD $3.99
Buy Movie HD $12.99

Rent

When renting, you have 30 days to start watching this video, and 48 hours to finish once started.

Rent Movie HD $3.99
Rent Movie SD $2.99

Buy

Buy Movie HD $12.99
Buy Movie SD $13.99
More Purchase Options
By placing your order, you agree to our Terms of Use. Sold by Amazon Digital Services LLC. Additional taxes may apply.

Product Details

Genres Drama, Romance, Adventure
Director Mira Nair
Starring Hilary Swank, Richard Gere
Supporting actors Ewan McGregor, Christopher Eccleston, Joe Anderson, Cherry Jones, Mia Wasikowska, Aaron Abrams, Dylan Roberts, Scott Yaphe, Tom Fairfoot, Ryann Shane, William Cuddy, Elizabeth Shepherd, Richard Donat, Scott Anderson, Sarah Kitz, Keelin Jack, Jeremy Akerman, Derek Keurvorst
Studio 20th Century Fox
MPAA rating PG (Parental Guidance Suggested)
Captions and subtitles English Details
Purchase rights Stream instantly Details
Format Amazon Video (streaming online video)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

"Amelia" is a perfectly adequate biopic, although I was hoping for more. Part of the problem is that it adheres to the conventions of the average historical drama, with moments of sweeping music, visually stunning landscapes, and voiceover narrations so perfectly placed that you can't help but feel a little manipulated. They're all provided by the title character, aviation pioneer Amelia Earheart (Hilary Swank), who disappeared in July of 1937 over the Pacific as she attempted to circumnavigate the globe; her words give us no more or less than poetic musings about the freedom of flying, the beauty of the sky, and the joy of living a dream. These bits of dialogue are not badly written, but honestly, is there nothing left to say that's original? For a film about a fascinating woman who lived a very fascinating life, I was surprised at just how generic it all seemed.

But let's not sell this movie short. Swank is perfectly cast, not only because her physical appearance is stunningly similar to Earhart's, but also because she gives yet another wonderful performance. We see a brave, determined, and sometimes stubborn woman who wanted to pave the way for other female pilots. Granted, we pretty much already knew this; numerous written accounts, some written by Earhart, cemented our perceptions of her a long time ago. Still, it's always a pleasure to see an actor taking someone else's qualities, mimicking them, and making the audience believe them. Swank has that kind of power, as she already demonstrated in films like "Boys Don't Cry" and "Million Dollar Baby." We see her as Earhart and invest in every smile, every laugh, and every line of dialogue.
Read more ›
Comment 16 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: DVD
I was surprised at all the bad reviews of this on Amazon.

I quite liked it.

Yes, it's slow. Yes, it lacks car explosions. (Or even many plane explosions.) Yes, it lacks zippy editing, no fancy crosscuts or funny camera angles or dream sequences.

Mostly, it moves chronologically--in the frame of a major flashback while flying.

But it has a lot of heart. Earhart seems to have been a solo, a dreamer, and mainly attached to exploration. So her emotions for people take a while to build. You actually see this process in the movie, and you see the struggle it causes her.

You can also see her growing (but never perfect) self-confidence.

The relationship with G. P. Putnam is handled superbly. Clearly, he loved her more than she loved him, and for her he was a friend who wanted exclusiveness--a difficult thing in a friend.

Her espousal of feminism is perfectly tuned. She is a person who disregards convention, so why should conventions hold back other women?

And at the end, her final flight is truly magnificent and touching. You can see her sense of betrayal--by equipment, by her own powers, even by the natural world she loves.

Great movie.
Comment 10 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Blu-ray
Much negative has been said about this movie. Having a casual interest in this figure's disappearance caused me to check out the film. The cast is strong and the settings are beautiful. When viewed on Blu-ray, the movie really captures in superb detail the landscapes that the aviatrix herself witnessed. I found the film engaging and enjoyed the bit about Amelia's flight with Eleanor Roosevelt. If you are looking for action or something rife with tension, then pass on this. However, this is a well-executed character piece with convincing actors who really bring a time in America's past to life...
Comment 24 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: DVD
AMELIA as a film suffers from ennui. Written by Ronald Bass and Ann Hamilton Phelan (with borrowed bits from biographies of Amelia Earhart by Susan Butler and by Mary S. Lovell) the script sounds like cut and pasted sayings and writings of Amelia rather than a well-developed story in the form of an interesting script. Mira Nair directs with attention to period detail but seemingly little concern for shaping characters about whom we should care. The film plays like a docudrama for television with only a few moments that actually bring the viewer into the vaguely mysterious personality of Amelia Earhart.

The film begins where it ends -with scenes from the air as Amelia (Hilary Swank) is on her doomed attempt to circumnavigate the globe in 1937 at age 40. She is accompanied by navigation expert Fred Noonan (Christopher Eccleston), passing notes to each other as they progress along the flight. The film cuts back and forth between 1928 when Amelia successfully flew across the Atlantic as the first woman passenger (the pilots are played well by Joe Anderson and Aaron Abrams), dawdles in the time of her success to marry her PR/publisher man George Putnam (Richard Gere), back in the air for more scenes form the 1937 flight, then back on ground as she prepares for and successfully flies across the Atlantic to Ireland. She meets and has an affair with Gene Vidal (Ewan McGregor), is constantly before the public selling lines of Amelia Earhart merchandise arranged by Putnam to finance her obsession with flying, and finally we see her board the Electra that she will successfully fly around a great portion of the air above the earth only to crash into the Pacific, never to be found.
Read more ›
Comment 5 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Recent Customer Reviews