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Average White Band?


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In reply to an earlier post on Dec 6, 2009, 1:07:39 AM PST
fanofthefab4 says:
Thank you so much DKPete for appreciating me and my info and what I'm trying to do. As far as Tomorrow Never Knows,yeah there is a heavy drum and heavy guitar/bass sound/playing. John always said that his 1965 Ticket To Ride was one of the first heavy metal songs because it had heavy guitars & drumming in it but especially the guitars and Paul played the great main lead on it and he suggested Ringo's drumming style on it too.Paul also played the great lead guitar on his Another Girl and he played the great lead guitar and bass on George's Taxman too.

But many people have called Helter Skelter and even I Want You and John's Revolution as the first true heavy metal songs,not for nothing does Ozzy Osbourne call The Beatles The Greatest Band To Ever Walk The Earth,and he's been a huge fan since he was a teenager. He chose She Loves You as one of his favorite songs for Rolling Stone a few years ago.

Posted on Dec 6, 2009, 1:13:07 AM PST
fanofthefab4 says:
Please nobody get mad at me for posting more to debunk the ignorant norcs,he could learn something and anyone like him,but of course it probably won't get through though.Below is award winning music professor and composer Dr.Glen Gass's Beatles College course.



Z401: The Music of The Beatles

Dr. Glenn Gass
Indiana University -- School of Music

An in-depth, song-by-song look at the music, lives and times of this extraordinary group and songwriting partnership. Offered at Indiana University since 1982, the course focuses on the Beatles' music and is aimed at heightening student listening skills as well as fostering a deeper appreciation for the Beatles' remarkable recordings. The music is supplemented by a multimedia course companion that provides biographical information, audio and video clips and a closer look at the Beatles' songwriting and recording process.


Fall 2009

Tues & Thurs 7:00 - 9:00 in Ballantine Hall 013

Instructor: Dr. Glenn Gass
Grading Assistant: Kelsey McCardle

Required text: "The Beatles" by Bob Spitz

Recommended Text: "The Beatles" by Hunter Davies

Listening: The Beatle albums are on reserve at the School of Music Library and at the Media Center in the Main Library

Click here for instructions on using the on-line reserve listening at the School of Music Library
Listening via Variations2 is also available for use at home (click here for information and for software downloading and installation instructions).

Students will be responsible for knowing all of the Beatle albums, along with the singles collected on the two Past Masters cd's.

Students are strongly encouraged to buy all of the Beatle CD's and have them in your permanent collection.
On 9/9/09 the long-awaited Beatle remasterings will be released making this an ideal time to purchase the Beatle catalog.

COURSE GRADES will be based on four exams, all of equal weight.

No make-ups will be given without a documented and officially sanctioned excuse. Instead, students who must miss an exam will take a comprehensive makeup exam at the end of the semester, following the final exam. This option is also available to students who wish to use the makeup to take the place of a lower exam score (it cannot hurt your grade).

The course grade is determined entirely by the results of the best four scores from the five exams (including the comprehensive make-up). The grading scale is fixed and must remain so in a class this size in the interest of fairness. All requests to "round up" a score or receive extra credit will be regretfully declined. The grading scale is:

A+ = 98%; A = 93%; A- = 90%
B+ = 88%; B = 83%; B- = 80%
C+ = 78%; C = 73%; C- = 70%
D+ = 68%; D = 63%; D- = 60%

Fall 2009 test dates:

TEST ONE: September 29 (Please Please Me, With the Beatles & Hard Day's Night; Spitz chapters 1 - 26)
TEST TWO: October 20 (Beatles For Sale, Help!, Rubber Soul; Spitz ch. 27 - 28)

TEST THREE: November 12 (Revolver, Sgt. Pepper, Magical Mystery Tour, Yellow Submarine; Spitz ch. 29 - 35)

TEST FOUR/Final Exam: Thursday December 17 at 7:15pm in BH 013 (White Album, Let It Be, Abbey Road; Spitz: read to end)

Note: the singles from Past Masters will also be included on the exams for the appropriate period.

LAPTOPS, Texting, Twittering, etc. will not be allowed in class. I apologize for this but the use of laptops and online devices of any sort has proven to be too much of a distraction.

Final note: I am no happier about our late exam date than you are, but there is nothing we can do to change it. Please keep it in mind and do not make plans to leave Bloomington until after the exam(!)

Grades will be available via the "Post 'Em" link on our class Oncourse site.

Beatles In London: Summer IU Office of Overseas Studies course

Music in General Studies homepage

Beatle Sites in England:
Glenn's Guide to the Beatles' England website: Beatle sites in London and Liverpool

A video tour of Beatles sites in London and Liverpool (17 minutes long: may take a while to load):

A shorter Beatle tour is also posted on YouTube.com (please view in "High Quality" mode if possible)

Two Beautiful Boys, Mathew and Julian (YouTube video, High Quality mode please)

Some WWW Beatle links:

Glenn's interview with Beatle biographer Hunter Davies

Bill Harry's Merseybeat online. Feedback and suggestions welcome and appreciated.

Another guide to Beatle Locations in London

Info on guided walking tours of Beatle sites in London.

A Liverpool Beatle locations site

The official BEATLES website

George's All Things Must Pass. website

Beatles Discography and Day-By-Day website.
The Beatles Lyrics webpage

Beatle lyrics from rare-lyrics.com

Beatles Number 9 website, a great site for archived interviews, books excerpts, history etc.

The massive Beatles Index site.

Beatle discography site.

Beatles triva quiz site.

Beatle Fan Club Christmas Records.

Beatlelinks

The Internet Beatles Recording Index: a fantastic central point for cross-indexed information about every song

Steve's Beatle Page, with lyrics and song info

Beatlelinks.net: Beatle Internet Resource Guide

The Bootleg Zone, with detailed information about Beatles recordings (and many other bands)

Songsofbeales.com: song lyrics and info

Forever: A Tribute to the Beatles (Beatles Tribute Band)

Give Peace a Chance, a John Lennon Tribute site.

Harmony Central, for chords and other music info for Beatle songs.

The Complete Beatles UK Discgraphby

The Usenet Guideto Beatle Recording Variations

The Beatles Ultimate Experience website

The official Abbey Road Studios website

Beatle City from Merseyworld.com, with Liverpool guides, song lyrics, etc

Beatle song lyrics

Another song lyrics site

Beatles Website, with song links, guitar chords, biographical info, etc.

Beatles London News and Information Service

Help! info website

Beatles Karaoke(!)

Operation Big Beat anniversary celebration, November 2001.

Liverpool Beatlescene International Fan Club

Beatles 64 Liverpool site

Ottawa Beatles Site

Subscribe to the World Beatles Forum, a great newsletter from Canada

RollingStone.com Beatle website

Beatles Portal on PopTopix

The University of Liverpool Institute of Popular Music.

The Liverpool Institute for Performing Arts

A good Hamburg and Astrid site

Helena's site of links

Beatles screensavers

David Rowley's " Story of the Beatles Songs"

Liverpool Books Online

Visit the on-line Beatles Karaoke(!) site

The Ultimate Beatles Archives

Join the Beatles newsgroup (rec.music.beatles)
Alan W. Pollack's Notes On series

The British Export webpage (a Beatles tribute band).

Lennon-McCartney website

Wonderwall website

The July 6, 1957 page

"Help! In the World"page from Spain

Misc Saki posts and facts

Links to some worldwide Beatle homepages

Here, There & Everywhere Beatle links

A great site from Japan, with information on Japanese Beatle releases

The Internet Beatle album (click on song titles)

A good John Lennon site

Beatle magazines and related periodicals

Beatlefest homepage

Some Beatle reference books

University of Liverpool Beatle info site

A virtual tour of Mathew Street, Liverpool

The online Mathew Street Beatles Store

Liverpool tourism info, with maps, etc.

A guide to the real Blue Jay Way

A good page exploring the Paul Is Dead myth.

The butcher cover page (click here to see the butcher cover)

A listing, with pictures of Beatle stamps from around the world.

Paul McCartney 1984 Playboy interview

An account of meeting the Beatles in 1968.

1989 Good Day Sunshine tour with Beatle site photos

A Beatle travel guide

Liverpool Productions Magical Mystery Tour to England

Glenn's Beatle concert ticket stub, Washington DC, 1966

Click here to return to Rock History at IU homepage

Posted on Dec 6, 2009, 1:19:36 AM PST
fanofthefab4 says:
That the Beatles mean so much to so many people who make music in so many genres goes without saying. What doesn't go without saying is what John, Paul, George and Ringo mean to these musicians, who share in their own words the important role the Fab Four have played in their songs and in their lives.

"The three of us [in Nirvana] grew up listening to the Beatles, then classic rock and punk. Somehow, it all came together." -Dave Grohl

"I don't think I could write with John Lennon. He's too genius ... All you [could] do is mess it up." -Miley Cyrus

"In Dublin we think the Beatles are Irish. There's a revenge against [the] class system that's a very Irish preoccupation... Here were the Fab Four spitting out a new vocabulary, that comes from that kind of revenge against the old idea of England that wasn't inclusive of the working class." -Bono

"I love the Beatles. What more can I say? I'm not gonna lie to you. I love `em. They make me happy. And I think they were the best, and still are." -Liam Gallagher

I don't think anybody comes close to the Beatles, including Oasis." -Brian May of Queen

"I heard `Rubber Soul' one night in my house here in LA, and I was so blown out that I said, `I have to record an album as good or better than `Rubber Soul.' If I ever do anything in my life, I'm going to make that good an album.'" -Brian Wilson

"You can't beat the Beatles. You join `em." -Peggy Lee

"The first [record] I can remember buying was `Meet the Beatles!' at a garage sale for five cents." -Billy Corgan

"The Beatles really synthesized what I wanted to do. The single biggest moment that I can remember being galvanized into wanting to be a musican for life was seeing the Beatles on `The Ed Sullivan Show.'" -Billy Joel

"I bought [John Lennon's] `Plastic Ono Band,' and I listened to it over and over for months. It's a monumental work of genius... The attitude and emotion of that album are harder than any punk rock I've ever heard." -Lenny Kravitz

"The Beatles were why we turned from a jug band into a rock `n' roll band. What we saw them doing was impossibly attractive." -Bob Weir of the Grateful Dead

"To be in the same room as the four of them caused me to not sleep for, like, three days." -Jeff Lynne

"The Beatles defined their own sense of values and honor. They took stances without ever being politically correct. And they did it all with incredible humor... I honestly think that there are certain things in life that help people understand themselves. I think the Beatles are one of those things. They resonate the journey of true selfhood, really." -Sophie B. Hawkins

"I'm probably the biggest Beatles fan on the planet." -Robin Zander of Cheap Trick

"A lot of that Beatles influence comes from Steven [Tyler]'s collaboration with Mark Hudson, both of whom are absolute Beatle freaks... I guess the goal is to try and emulate probably some of the best music of the last 50 years, which has to be the Beatles." -Brad Whitford of Aerosmith

"We looked deep down inside the very core of our souls and there was a little Ringo sitting there. Sure, we like telling people it's John Lennon or George Harrison, but when you really look deep inside of Soundgarden, there's a little Ringo wanting to get out." - Kim Thayil of Soundgarden

"[The Beatles were] the start of the reason why we're doing a band." -Vicki Peterson of the Bangles

"How could you not be influenced by the Beatles if you write songs?" -Sean Lennon

Which Beatle Are You? Quiz

Artist Main:

The Beatles

Pearl Jam's Mike McCready Praises The `Phenomenal' Beatles

But he might not be so good at the just-released `Beatles: Rock Band': `I need to work on my skills.'

by Kyle Anderson

Pearl Jam's Mike McCready (MTV News)

Pearl Jam already have several links to "Rock Band," as they have made their classic debut Ten available in its entirety as a playable download and will be dropping their forthcoming album

Backspacer in the same fashion once it's released September 20. And though founding guitarist Mike McCready has played the game and is excited for the Wednesday (September 9) release of "The Beatles: Rock Band," he has a confession to make.

"I honestly grew up listening to the Stones more," McCready told MTV News at the Outside Lands Festival. "But that doesn't mean I don't love the Beatles."

McCready cited the band's harmonies as a musical development that really inspired him, and he also gave a nod to a classic piece of video. "The concert footage on the roof was probably something that was integral in my growing up."

The footage in question is the surprise show the Beatles gave in January 1969 that marked the end of the recording of Let It Be and ended up being the band's final public appearance together. McCready did learn one profound thing from the Beatles. "My manager says you never want to release anything against the Beatles, because they'll always win," he joked. "And they should, because they were phenomenal."

As for "Rock Band," McCready admitted he needs practice. "I play `Rock Band' with my friends' kids, and they completely beat me senseless with it," he admitted. "I feel like I'm holding them back. I try to play the drums, and I just can't play the drums. I think I need to work on my skills."

But when Backspacer becomes available as a playable full-album download, McCready said players will be able to develop their skills on a few of his favorite tracks. "I would say try the solo on `Amongst the Waves.' And just rock out to `Gonna See My Friend.' That'll be fun to jump around to and play. Stomp as much as you possibly can. That's rock!"

For more on "The Beatles: Rock Band" check out Multiplayer.MTV.com.

This report is from MTV News.

The Beatles

Pearl Jam

The Beatles Rock Band

Remastered Beatles CDs Are A Revelation

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In reply to an earlier post on Dec 6, 2009, 1:46:19 AM PST
fanofthefab4 says:
You know your music - so do we. THE ALLMUSIC BLOG



Artist/Group Album Song Classical Work

Classical Corner Artist Spotlight
Top Composers Classical Reviews



I'm Down
The Beatles

Composed By
John Lennon/Paul McCartney All Performers that have performed this Title



Song Review by Richie Unterberger

"I'm Down," the B-side of "Help!," was one of the most frantic rockers in the entire Beatles catalog. The very first line - sung a cappella by the principal writer, Paul McCartney - was about as larynx-twisting an upper-register, non-falsetto vocal as was possible in rock music. Critics have often noted that the vocal and the song itself are very much in the Little Richard style, and some see it as little more than a rewrite of Little Richard's "Long Tall Sally." It's true there are some similarities between "I'm Down" and "Long Tall Sally," but it's not just a blatant copy. For one thing, there are the great call-and-response vocals between McCartney and the other Beatles, as well as the sudden jerky shifts in tempo in which the instruments periodically stop altogether. George Harrison lets loose with one of his patented bluesy, slightly disheveled, growling guitar solos, and then it's back to a final verse where McCartney really climbs the high notes for emphasis. That done with, it's time for one of the group's more crazed and elongated fadeouts, kicked off by a hair-raising McCartney scream, then settling into more vocal trades between him and the group as well as some wild organ playing by John Lennon. Although The Beatles Recording Sessions tells listeners that seven takes were completed at the session, the song has a wonderfully loose, almost jammy feel. Listen to the part where McCartney starts the final verse, for instance, and his first line is answered with a lazy, almost diffident guitar sliding slowly up the low notes.

Not that it hurts the song any, but there's a contradiction between the mood of the lyrics - ostensibly a guy down in the dumps about being dumped - and the delivery. McCartney does not sound down in the dumps; he sounds like he's having the time of his life, with an energy that's incredibly infectious. "I'm Down" was a great live favorite of the Beatles' mid-'60s shows, as seen in the famous footage of their 1965 Shea Stadium concert, which closed with an especially wild performance of the song. There have not been many covers of "I'm Down"; indeed, for years it was surprisingly hard to hear, as it didn't get issued on a Beatles LP until the mid-'70s. There were a couple of surprising attempts, however, one a live version (recorded in 1966, released in the 1980s) by the 13th Floor Elevators, with Roky Erickson contributing a demented lead vocal that was grating where McCartney's was uplifting. Even more surprisingly, Yes, a group not known for rock-'em-sock-'em party tunes, did "I'm Down" in concert.


Appears On

Year
Album



1976 Rock & Roll Music 2:32 Capitol


1980 Rock & Roll Music, Vol. 2 2:38 Capitol


1988 Past Masters, Vol. 1 2:31 Capitol

AMG Track Picks

She Loves You, I Want to Hold Your Hand, I Feel Fine, I'm Down

1988 Past Masters, Vols. 1 & 2 Capitol


1988 The Beatles Box Set [1988] 2:31 Capitol


1989 Five Nights in a Judo Arena Swingin' Pig


1991 Help/I'm Down Capitol


1993 Artifacts, 1958-1970 2:18 Big Music


1993 Compact Disc Singles Collection 2:33 Capitol


1996 Anthology 2 2:53 Apple/Capitol

AMG Track Picks

Yes It Is, If You've Got Trouble, That Means a Lot, I'm Looking Through You, Strawberry Fields Forever

1996 Anthology Video, Vol. 5 Apple


1998 Live in Japan 3:40 Walrus


1999 CD Singles Collection 2:33 EMI

AMG Track Picks

We Can Work It Out, Paperback Writer, Strawberry Fields Forever, Don't Let Me Down, I Am the Walrus, I'm Down, Ticket to Ride, She's a Woman, Revolution, All You Need Is Love

2001 Beatles Story CTA


2003 Around the World Import


2008 Cartoons Brainmade


2009 The Beatles: Stereo Box Set Capitol


Budokan Concert VAP Inport


Concerts 1964-66 [DVD]


Unauthorised Live, Vol. 1 Joker


Video Scrapbook Encore Entertainment Imprort

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 6, 2009, 1:48:51 AM PST
fanofthefab4 says:
You know your music - so do we. THE ALLMUSIC BLOG


She's a Woman

The Beatles

Composed By
John Lennon/Paul McCartney



Song Review by Richie Unterberger


"She's a Woman" was one of the hardest-rocking early Beatles originals, and although it was the B-side to "I Feel Fine," it was almost as big a hit in its own right, reaching number four on the American charts. Sung and primarily written by Paul McCartney, it's a belter that illustrates how the Beatles could be bluesy without writing conventional blues songs that stuck to normal blues progressions. Right from the start, the track has a brash, almost harsh edge, with choppy guitar chords that are more like barks than power chords. McCartney, too often unfairly pegged as a sweet balladeer, demonstrates that he was also one of the best white rock hard singers of all time with his shrill yet rich, even ballsy, vocal. Certainly his vocal style here betrays a strong trace of Little Richard, but it's unfair to accuse him of imitating or lifting wholesale from his idol. In its confidence and assertiveness, McCartney's high-octane style is most assuredly his own. The basic, R&B-derived melody is effectively counterpointed with one of the briefer Beatle bridges on record, in which the Beatles detour into some non- blues chords and melodies for just a few bars before returning to the main thrust of the tune. McCartney, while devoting most of the words to celebration and praise of his woman, throws in a couple of phrases as evidence that he's starting to think in more sophisticated terms, particularly the line "turns me on when I get lonely" (a very, very early use of "turn me on" slang). There's also the declaration that his love doesn't buy him presents, even though she's no peasant. Peasant's an unusual word to use in a pop song no matter what the era, and McCartney's value of true love over money (as previously also stated in "Can't Buy Me Love") is eternally hip. George Harrison executes a crafty blues-rock solo with a touch of country influence that's, as was his wont, just right for the song at hand. The ending is uncommonly unimaginative for a Beatles track, with McCartney repeating the title phrase several times over a fade; a more basic alternate take exists (on bootleg) in which he extends this section by improvising on that title line for a few minutes.

He'd have to wait until "Hey Jude," however, to take that approach to the multi-extended fade onto an official single. As a rabble-rousing rocker, "She's a Woman" was a natural for the Beatles' live shows; a 1965 version was recorded for their The Beatles at the Hollywood Bowl album, and it was still part of their set on their final world tour in 1966. The most famous, or notorious, cover of "She's a Woman" was done by Jeff Beck in the mid-'70s, employing a voicebox on his guitar to sing-play the lyrics. That version was an FM radio favorite for a while, and subsequently sometimes scorned (as were Peter Frampton's voicebox-heavy tracks) as an example of mid-'70s hard rock excess.




Appears On
Rating
Year
Album

Length
Label

1964 Beatles '65
2:57 Capitol
AMG Track Picks

No Reply, I'll Follow the Sun, I Feel Fine

196Z Beatles in Italy EMI


1977 Live at the Hollywood Bowl 2:47 Capitol


1984 The Compleat Beatles [Video] MGM


1988 Past Masters, Vol. 1
3:03 Capitol
AMG Track Picks

She Loves You, I Want to Hold Your Hand, I Feel Fine, I'm Down

1988 Past Masters, Vols. 1 & 2 Capitol


1988 The Beatles Box Set [1988] 3:03 Capitol


1988 Ultra Rare Trax, Vol. 1 The Swingin' Pig


1989 Documents, Vol. 2 6:31 Oh Boy


1989 Five Nights in a Judo Arena Swingin' Pig


1989 Hold Me Tight 6:34 Condor


1989 Ultra Rare Trax, Vol. 6 6:32 The Swingin' Pig


1989 Unsurpassed Masters, Vol. 2 (1964-1965) Yellow Dog


1991 British Rock: 1st Wave [video] RCA


1991 I Feel Fine/She's a Woman Capitol


1992 Ready Steady Go!, Vol. 3 [Video] Pioneer


1992 The Beatles Box Set [1992] Capitol


1993 Artifacts, 1958-1970 6:32 Big Music


1993 Compact Disc Singles Collection 3:01 Capitol


1994 Artifacts II 1960-1969 3:19 Big Music


1994 Complete BBC Sessions Great Dane


1994 Live at the BBC 3:14 Apple/Capitol
AMG Track Picks

I'll Be on My Way, Soldier of Love (Lay Down Your Arms)

1996 Anthology 2
2:54 Apple/Capitol
AMG Track Picks
Yes It Is, If You've Got Trouble, That Means a Lot, I'm Looking Through You, Strawberry Fields Forever

1996 Anthology Video, Vol. 5 Apple


1998 Live in Japan 2:52 Walrus


1999 CD Singles Collection

3:01 EMI
AMG Track Picks
We Can Work It Out, Paperback Writer, Strawberry Fields Forever, Don't Let Me Down, I Am the Walrus, I'm Down, Ticket to Ride, She's a Woman, Revolution, All You Need Is Love

1999 EP Boxset 3:05 EMI


2001 Beatles Story CTA


2003 Around the World Import


2004 The Capitol Albums, Vol. 1 3:01 Capitol
AMG Track Picks
I Want to Hold Your Hand, It Won't Be Long, I Wanna Be Your Man, Roll Over Beethoven, You Can't Do That, She Loves You, I'll Cry Instead, Things We Said Today, And I Love Her, No Reply, I'm a Loser, She's a Woman, I Feel Fine

2009 The Beatles: Stereo Box Set Capitol


Budokan Concert VAP Inport


Concerts 1964-66 [DVD]


Unauthorised Live, Vol. 1 Joker

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 6, 2009, 1:52:21 AM PST
fanofthefab4 says:
You know your music - so do we. THE ALLMUSIC BLOG


You Can't Do That

The Beatles

Composed By
John Lennon/Paul McCartney All Performers that have performed this Title



Song Review by Richie Unterberger


As the B-side to "Can't Buy Me Love," "You Can't Do That" was a worthy companion to the more well-known hit, particularly as it was also one of the Beatles' grittiest and hardest-rocking early originals. The track was introduced by a ringing, circular George Harrison guitar lick that marked the first time he played 12-string electric guitar on a Beatles recording - an innovation that would figure strongly not just in the Beatles' mid-'60s records, but also in the development of folk-rock. Rhythmically the song has a funkier, more soulful beat than anything else the Beatles had previously done, perhaps sparked by increased exposure to American soul music as the group began to tour the U.S. John Lennon, in fact, specifically cited Wilson Pickett as an inspiration for the song, although since Pickett had barely begun to record under his own name when "You Can't Do That" was written in early 1964, one wonders if Lennon was influenced by Pickett only in hindsight. The song had no shortage of dynamite hooks, particularly the insistent stuttering beats at the end of each verse and bridge, the thrilling soulful responsive harmonies that answer Lennon's lead vocal, and the dramatic rising harmony vocals that accompany Lennon on the bridge.

Lennon lets loose with one of his all-time great screams to launch the instrumental break, in which he makes his debut as a lead guitarist on a Beatles record, with crunchy, frenetic riffing that suits the tune well. Listen also for the very end, in which a reprise of the principal 12-string guitar riff suddenly slows to a crawl for the last three notes. Lyrically this is one of the toughest Lennon- McCartney songs, principally written by Lennon , and verging almost on misogyny in its threats to leave a girl if she so much as talks to another guy. There's an underlying note of insecurity, however, in his laments that others will laugh in his face if they see her acting the way she does. "You Can't Do That" was honored with a most unusual cover version by Nilsson a few years later on his debut album, in which he did not so much sing "You Can't Do That" as use its main motifs for the body of a track which interwove brief phrases from other Beatles classics like "Can't Buy Me Love," "Day Tripper," "You're Going to Lose That Girl," and "Drive My Car."



Appears On

Year
Album



1964 A Hard Day's Night [UK] 2:37 Capitol

AMG Track Picks

A Hard Day's Night, I Should Have Known Better, And I Love Her, Can't Buy Me Love

1964 The Beatles Beat Odeon


1964 The Beatles' Second Album 2:23 Capitol

AMG Track Picks

You Can't Do That, I'll Get You, She Loves You

1976 Rock & Roll Music 2:37 Capitol


1980 Rock & Roll Music, Vol. 1 2:33 Capitol


1988 The Beatles Box Set [1988] 2:37 Capitol


1990 Ready Steady Go!, Vol. 1 [Video] Pioneer


1991 Can't Buy Me Love/You Can't Do That Capitol


1993 Artifacts, 1958-1970 2:38 Big Music


1993 Compact Disc Singles Collection 2:34 Capitol


1994 Complete BBC Sessions Great Dane


1994 Complete BBC Sessions Great Dane


1994 The Making of a Hard Day's Night MPI


1995 Anthology 1 2:42 Apple/Capitol

AMG Track Picks

Free as a Bird, Ain't She Sweet, One After 909, All My Loving, A Hard Day's Night, Leave My Kitten Alone

1999 CD Singles Collection 2:34 EMI

AMG Track Picks

We Can Work It Out, Paperback Writer, Strawberry Fields Forever, Don't Let Me Down, I Am the Walrus, I'm Down, Ticket to Ride, She's a Woman, Revolution, All You Need Is Love

199Z The Get Back Journals VigoTone


2001 Beatles Story CTA


2001 The Beatles Beat: The Beatles Sessions [Bootleg] Odeon Bootleg



2004 The Capitol Albums, Vol. 1 2:40 Capitol

AMG Track Picks

I Want to Hold Your Hand, It Won't Be Long, I Wanna Be Your Man, Roll Over Beethoven, You Can't Do That, She Loves You, I'll Cry Instead, Things We Said Today, And I Love Her, No Reply, I'm a Loser, She's a Woman, I Feel Fine


2009 The Beatles: Stereo Box Set Capitol


It's All in the Mind Y'know Beat


The Beatles, Vol. 3 Beat/Cool Daddy


The Beatles: 16 Superhits, Vol. 3 2:36 Dorado

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 6, 2009, 1:54:51 AM PST
fanofthefab4 says:
You know your music - so do we. THE ALLMUSIC BLOG

Artist/Group Album Song Classical Work



Revolution
The Beatles

Composed By
John Lennon/Paul McCartney All Performers that have performed this Title



Song Review

by Richie Unterberger

As the B-side of "Hey Jude," "Revolution" formed one-half of a worthy contender for the best rock single of all time. As with another contender, "Penny Lane"/ "Strawberry Fields Forever," each side represented one of the best and most characteristic songwriting efforts by Paul McCartney and John Lennon, respectively (even if they were billed to Lennon- McCartney jointly, out of contractual custom). "Revolution" was, of course, quite different in tone from "Hey Jude," one of the group's best ballads. In contrast, "Revolution" was one of their greatest, most furious rockers, also featuring some of Lennon's most challenging, fiery lyrics. It must first be noted that two entirely different arrangements of "Revolution" were recorded and released. A slow one with doo wop-inspired harmonies, officially titled "Revolution 1," appeared on The Beatles (popularly known as the White Album); the faster and, most would agree, superior version appeared on the B-side of the "Hey Jude" single. The song described here will be the single version, simply entitled "Revolution." Leading off with a startling machine-gun fuzz guitar riff and a scream, the heart immediately starts pounding before Lennon goes into the first verse. (Trivia note: An obscure 1954 recording by bluesman Pee Wee Crayton, "Do Unto Others," has an opening riff that sounds almost identical to the riff that opens "Revolution." Coincidence, or not?) Combining one of his throatiest vocals and the consistently buzzing, fuzzy guitars, you have one of the most down-and-dirty Beatles tracks ever.

In "Revolution," Lennon seems to be questioning, quite reasonably, the validity of changing the world through violent means. He was setting himself up for criticism from all sides here, particularly in the turbulent year of 1968: the establishment was angered by anyone talking about "Revolution" in any context, while some of the left viewed refusal to overthrow society by any means necessary as a cowardly sellout. Lennon is quite emphatic, however, that when it comes to violence, you can count him out. (Typically, he would sit on the fence on this issue over the years, and in "Revolution 1," qualify his observation by immediately singing the word "in" after declaring that he could be counted out.) Characteristically, optimism prevails in the Beatles' world, even when taking on one of the most explosive subjects possible, as on the uplifting chorus (helped greatly by harmony vocals), when the group urgently and repeatedly reassures listeners that everything's going to be all right. Those reassurances become sing-shouts in the final refrain, though the loud guitar figures in the background imply that everything might not be all right, as does a final near-hysterical repetition of the phrase by Lennon. "Revolution," incidentally, was one of the few Beatles tracks to feature a contribution from an outside rock session musician, Nicky Hopkins, who adds ebullient keyboards to the performance.



Appears On

Year
Album



1968 Hey Jude [Single] Apple


1970 Hey Jude
3:21 Capitol

AMG Track Picks

Paperback Writer, Hey Jude, Old Brown Shoe

1973 1967-1970

3:25 Capitol

AMG Track Picks

Strawberry Fields Forever, Penny Lane, I Am the Walrus, Hey Jude, Don't Let Me Down, Here Comes the Sun, Something

1976 Rock & Roll Music 3:24 Capitol


1980 Rock & Roll Music, Vol. 2 3:21 Capitol


1984 The Compleat Beatles [Video] MGM


1988 Imagine: John Lennon [Original Soundtrack]

3:22 Capitol

AMG Track Picks

Real Love, In My Life, The Ballad of John and Yoko, Jealous Guy, (Just Like) Starting Over, Imagine

1988 Past Masters, Vol. 2

3:24 Capitol

AMG Track Picks

Day Tripper, We Can Work It Out, Rain, Hey Jude

1988 Past Masters, Vols. 1 & 2 Capitol


1988 The Beatles Box Set [1988] 3:24 Capitol


1989 Ultra Rare Trax, Vol. 5 3:19 The Swingin' Pig


1991 Hey Jude/Revolution Capitol


1991 Unsurpassed Masters, Vol. 7 (1962-1969) Yellow Dog


1993 Artifacts, 1958-1970 3:19 Big Music


1993 Compact Disc Singles Collection 3:22 Capitol


1993 Unsurpassed Demos Yellow Dog


1994 Artifacts II 1960-1969 3:58 Big Music


1994 Revolution Vigotone


1996 Anthology Video, Vol. 8 Apple


1999 CD Singles Collection

3:22 EMI

AMG Track Picks

We Can Work It Out, Paperback Writer, Strawberry Fields Forever, Don't Let Me Down, I Am the Walrus, I'm Down, Ticket to Ride, She's a Woman, Revolution, All You Need Is Love

199Z The Get Back Journals VigoTone


2000 Imagine: John Lennon [Japan] 3:24 EMI


2006 LOVE [Bonus DVD] 2:14 Capitol/Apple



2006 LOVE 2:14 Capitol/Apple

AMG Track Picks

Drive My Car/The Word/What You're Doing, Strawberry Fields Forever, Within You Without You/Tomorrow Never Knows, While My Guitar Gently Weeps

2008 LOVE [Special Edition] EMD Int'l


2009 The Beatles: Stereo Box Set Capitol

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 6, 2009, 1:56:44 AM PST
fanofthefab4 says:
You know your music - so do we. THE ALLMUSIC BLOG



Abbey Road
The Beatles



Artist

The Beatles

Album

Abbey Road

Rating *****


Release Date

Sep 26, 1969

Label


Capitol


Genre Styles
Pop/Rock
Album Rock
Rock & Roll
Pop/Rock
British Psychedelia
Psychedelic
Sunshine Pop
Prog-Rock/ Art Rock
AM Pop
Hard Rock


Moods Themes
Whimsical
Naive
Elegant
Sophisticated
Cheerful
Freewheeling
Complex
Brassy
Fun
Romantic
Bittersweet
Sweet
Refined/ Mannered
Brash
Laid-Back/ Mellow
Hypnotic
Intimate
Self-Conscious
Lush
Energetic
Passionate
Road Trip
Reflection
Summertime
Housework


AMG Album ID

R 1525


Corrections to this Entry?

Review by Richie Unterberger

The last Beatles album to be recorded (although Let It Be was the last to be released), Abbey Road was a fitting swan song for the group, echoing some of the faux-conceptual forms of Sgt. Pepper, but featuring stronger compositions and more rock-oriented ensemble work. The group was still pushing forward in all facets of its art, whether devising some of the greatest harmonies to be heard on any rock record (especially on "Because"), constructing a medley of songs/vignettes that covered much of side two, adding subtle touches of Moog synthesizer, or crafting furious guitar-heavy rock ("The End," "I Want You (She's So Heavy)," "Come Together"). George Harrison also blossomed into a major songwriter, contributing the buoyant "Here Comes the Sun" and the supremely melodic ballad "Something," the latter of which became the first Harrison-penned Beatles hit. Whether Abbey Road is the Beatles' best work is debatable, but it's certainly the most immaculately produced (with the possible exception of Sgt. Pepper) and most tightly constructed.


Tracks




Title
Composer
Time

1 Come Together Lennon, McCartney 04:20
2 Something Harrison 03:02
3 Maxwell's Silver Hammer Lennon, McCartney 03:27
4 Oh! Darling Lennon, McCartney 03:26
5 Octopus's Garden Starkey, Starr 02:51
6 I Want You (She's So Heavy) Lennon, McCartney 07:47
7 Here Comes the Sun Harrison 03:05
8 Because Lennon, McCartney 02:45
9 You Never Give Me Your Money Lennon, McCartney 04:02
10 Sun King Lennon, McCartney 02:26
11 Mean Mr. Mustard Lennon, McCartney 01:06
12 Polythene Pam Lennon, McCartney 01:12
13 She Came in Through the Bathroom Window Lennon, McCartney 01:57
14 Golden Slumbers Lennon, McCartney 01:31
15 Carry That Weight Lennon, McCartney 01:36
16 The End Lennon, McCartney 02:19
17 Her Majesty Lennon, McCartney 00:23

indicates Track Pick
indicates a click-through to a song review




Releases
Year
Type
Label
Catalog #

1987 CD Capitol C2-46446
1987 CS Capitol C4-46446
1978 LP Capitol SEAX-11900
1987 LP Capitol C1-46446
1991 LP Capitol 003831
1991 CS Capitol 003834
1978 LP Capitol 119001
1989 LP Parlophone 1042431
2007 CD Toshiba EMI 51122
1983 CD Toshiba EMI 353016
2009 CD Capitol 82468

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 6, 2009, 2:10:08 AM PST
fanofthefab4 says:
By the way The Beatles I Feel Fine Came Out almost a year before The Rolling Stones Satisfaction which then also featured prominent guitar riffs minus the Beatles first recorded feedback guitar.There are 3 blatant examples of The Beatles doing something first and then not long after The Rolling Stones do something similar,this song and George played the sitar(really well too,and it's not as easy as a guitar to learn to play) on John's Norwegian Wood which was recorded in October 1965 on The Beatles brilliant critically acclaimed folk rock album Rubber Soul,(which Brian Wilson said blew him away,he said all of the songs flowed together and it was folk rock but pop music at the same time and this is what he said he couldn't believe and it motivated him to make Pet Sounds) and it was the first ever played on a pop rock song,and then in May 1966 Brian Jones plays a sitar on Paint It Black,and then not long after The Beatles made the critically acclaimed popular Sgt.Pepper album The Rolling Stones came out with a poor attempt to imitate them with their Satantic Majesties Request album.

You know your music - so do we. THE ALLMUSIC BLOG



Artist/Group Album Song Classical Work



I Feel Fine
The Beatles Send to Friend

Composed By
John Lennon/Paul McCartney All Performers that have performed this Title



Song Review by Richie Unterberger

"I Feel Fine" was a typically first-class 1964 Beatles single, topping the charts on both sides of the Atlantic. It was distinguished from its predecessors by a more complex guitar sound, particularly in its introduction, a sustained plucked electric note that after a few seconds swelled in volume and buzzed like an electric razor. This was the very first use of feedback on a rock record. It's been claimed that others (such as the Who, the Yardbirds, and Creation guitarist Eddie Phillips) had developed guitar feedback, or something approximating it, live before the Beatles did "I Feel Fine." It seems inarguable, however, that the Beatles were the first to use it on disc; probably no other group had the clout to get away with that experiment in late 1964. Anyway, the brief feedback was but a preamble to a bubbly Beatles song paced by a brilliantly active and difficult George Harrison guitar riff, inspired perhaps by a similar line in obscure soul singer Bobby Parker's 1961 single "Watch Your Step." Ringo Starr deserves commendation himself for the series of four urgent drum beats that kicks off both the first verse ( after Harrison has gone through the principal riff) and the return to the verse after the instrumental break. The singing, as usual, was John and Paul's show primarily, with particularly sumptuous harmonies counterpointing John's lead in the bridge. Rather than coming to a cold stop after the last chorus, an unaccompanied electric guitar continues to noodle as Lennon wordlessly scats, while the Beatles faintly bark (like dogs, yes) in the background - another imaginative ending from a group that used them often. Lennon, the more prominent songwriter than McCartney on "I Feel Fine," has rightly been noted as having the more doubtful and pessimistic view of the pair in his lyrics, even in the early days. There's no trace of doubt or pessimism, however, in "I Feel Fine," which certainly is one of his most positive and optimistic musical statements.

Appears On

Year
Album



1964 Beatles '65 2:20 Capitol

AMG Track Picks

No Reply, I'll Follow the Sun, I Feel Fine

1965 The Beatles' Million Sellers [EP] Parlophone


1966 A Collection of Beatles Oldies 2:21 Parlophone


196Z Beatles in Italy EMI


1973 1962-1966 2:19 Capitol
AMG Track Picks

Please Please Me, I Want to Hold Your Hand, A Hard Day's Night, Ticket to Ride, Help!, We Can Work It Out, In My Life, Paperback Writer

1982 The 20 Greatest Hits 2:20 Capitol


1988 Past Masters, Vol. 1 2:19 Capitol

AMG Track Picks

She Loves You, I Want to Hold Your Hand, I Feel Fine, I'm Down

1988 Past Masters, Vols. 1 & 2 Capitol


1988 The Beatles Box Set [1988] 2:19 Capitol


1989 Documents, Vol. 2 5:50 Oh Boy


1989 Five Nights in a Judo Arena Swingin' Pig


1989 Ultra Rare Trax, Vol. 4 The Swingin' Pig


1989 Unsurpassed Masters, Vol. 2 (1964-1965) Yellow Dog


1991 I Feel Fine/She's a Woman Capitol


1991 Unsurpassed Masters, Vol. 7 (1962-1969) Yellow Dog


1992 The Beatles Box Set [1992] Capitol


1993 Artifacts, 1958-1970 2:51 Big Music


1993 Compact Disc Singles Collection 2:24 Capitol


1994 Artifacts II 1960-1969 2:25 Big Music


1994 Complete BBC Sessions Great Dane


1994 Live at the BBC 2:12 Apple/Capitol
AMG Track Picks

I'll Be on My Way, Soldier of Love (Lay Down Your Arms)

1996 Anthology 2 2:15 Apple/Capitol

AMG Track Picks

Yes It Is, If You've Got Trouble, That Means a Lot, I'm Looking Through You, Strawberry Fields Forever

1996 Anthology Video, Vol. 5 Apple


1998 Live in Japan 2:19 Walrus


1999 CD Singles Collection 2:24 EMI

AMG Track Picks

We Can Work It Out, Paperback Writer, Strawberry Fields Forever, Don't Let Me Down, I Am the Walrus, I'm Down, Ticket to Ride, She's a Woman, Revolution, All You Need Is Love

1999 EP Boxset 2:22 EMI


1999 Forever Gold 2:22 Diamond



2000 1 2:18 Apple/Capitol

AMG Track Picks

She Loves You, I Feel Fine, Ticket to Ride, We Can Work It Out, Penny Lane, Hey Jude, Something

2001 Beatles Story CTA


2003 Around the World Import


2004 The Capitol Albums, Vol. 1 2:23 Capitol

AMG Track Picks

I Want to Hold Your Hand, It Won't Be Long, I Wanna Be Your Man, Roll Over Beethoven, You Can't Do That, She Loves You, I'll Cry Instead, Things We Said Today, And I Love Her, No Reply, I'm a Loser, She's a Woman, I Feel Fine


2006 Tribute to the Beatles: The Essential Collection 2:13 Red Box

AMG Track Picks

Day Tripper, I Feel Fine, Lucy in the Sky with Diamonds, Paperback Writer

2008 Cartoons Brainmade


2009 The Beatles: Stereo Box Set Capitol


Budokan Concert VAP Inport


Concerts 1964-66 [DVD]


Unauthorised Live, Vol. 1 Joker

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 6, 2009, 2:30:07 AM PST
Hi, fanofthefab4! Yeah, I understand. I do get into a lot of trouble in life because of it. But, still, unless we're talking Charlie Manson here, as opposed to Charlie Brown or Charlie's Angels, I do try to at least be civil and kind, if possible. I also have a good sense of humor, so as long as my Beatles records can't be taken away (only mocked), I'm o.k. with it. You have no idea what I have to put up with in certain situations. On one of the McCartney blogs, they have a lot of sycophants. I wish they'd at least try to be a little real. I mean that not every little thing Paul McCartney or the Beatles did was golden. However, once I start naming names, so to speak, they go bananas. Anyway, it's late here in California, so I have to go to sleep now. Thanks for the kind words. fanofthefab4. I'll try to reply when appropriate. The only problem is that when I have to do a bit of thinking, as opposed to just rattling off some half-remembered facts, it takes a while and keeps me from my listening and viewing (nonsense) pleasure. So, Take Care and nice to figuratively meet you. Best Wishes, Pat. P.S. The Beatles/Kinks/Move are my three official favorites, but I love and know something about a couple of hundred other groups/artists. Happy Holidays. Good Night. Over and Out.

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 6, 2009, 3:02:15 AM PST
fanofthefab4 says:
Patrick, did you see my post I made about if you click on this ignoramous norcs profile he has a picture of a t-shirt that says The Beatles Are Gay, (as I said all of the tons of young women groupies The Beatles had sex with plus all of their girlfriends and wives would laugh at this one!) it just goes to show how stupid,ignorant and immature they are, I really hope they are under the age of 16 or else it's really scary!

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 6, 2009, 3:07:41 AM PST
fanofthefab4 says:
DKPete, I have been a Beatles fan since I was 9 and I started to collect their albums, I got my first Beatles book for my 11th birthday ( and then I became an even bigger fan,,and I had every album by age 13, I was born after 1964 too, so yes I do know a lot about them.

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 6, 2009, 3:23:09 AM PST
fanofthefab4 says:
Universiry Of Penn Graduate & Musicologist Alan W.Pollack's 11 Year Series Notes On Every Beatles Song

home authors calendar colophon links newsgroups newsfeed new
volume 1
january 1999 Notes on ... Series journal on media culture
ISSN 1567-7745

volumes
Volume 12 / 2009-2010 -
Volume 11 / 2008-2009 -
Volume 10 / 2007-2008 -
Volume 9 / 2006-2007 -
Volume 8 / 2005-2006 -
Volume 7 / 2004-2005 -
Volume 6 / 2003-2004 -
Volume 5 / 2002-2003 -
Volume 4 / 2001-2002 -
Volume 3 / 2000-2001 -
Volume 2 / 1999-2000 -
Volume 1 / 1998-1999 -
Editorials and Op-Eds -


databases
Alan W. Pollack's Notes On ... -
Markus Heuger's Beabliography -
Rare Pictures from Radio's Past -
Zeezender Discografie -


dossiers
Beatles Studies -
Comics and Cartoons -
History of Radio and Television -
Local and Global Radio -
Offshore Radio Stations -
Popular Music Studies -
Rock Song Anatomy -
Studies in Photography -
Theory and Methodology -


Index of the series in numerical order
by Alan W. Pollack



In 1989 the American musicologist Alan W. Pollack started to analyze the songs of the Beatles. He published his first results on internet. In 1991 - after he had finished the work on 28 songs - he bravely decided to do the whole lot of them. About ten years later, in 2000 he completed the analysis of the official Beatles' canon, consisting of 187 songs and 25 covers. Here we have ordered this massive work in five categories. And, for your convenience, we've added an alphabetical, a canonical and a chronological index as well as a short introduction.



A Beatles' Odyssey. A short introduction to Pollack's ten year musicological journey along the long and winding roads of the Beatles' songs.


Alphabetical index. All of Pollack's analyses indexed in the alphabetical order of the songs' titles.
The official Beatles' canon. Pollack's song analyses of the official Beatles' canon arranged according to the dates of the songs' first releases.
The twelve recording projects of the Beatles. Pollack's song analyses arranged according to the chronology of the Beatles' twelve recording projects.



The first 28 song analyses (1-28). Pollack started his series with a selection of songs from the Beatles' songbook. Looking at these songs, Pollack concentrates on the central elements and characteristics of the musical idiom of the 'Fab Four'. Next to insightful analyses, this series offers a short course in the necessary musicological concepts.


Beatlemania (1962-1964) (29-64). In their first years as song writers and performers, the Beatles developed their own style of popular music out of the roots of American rock 'n' roll and rhythm and blues. Here Pollack analyses the peculiarities of these early Beatles' songs. This series of 36 pieces includes the first singles and songs on the albums Please Please Me, With The Beatles, A Hard Days Night, and Beatles For Sale.



Becoming artists (1965-1966) (65-103). In the middle of the sixties rock musicians began to see themselves as artists. The Beatles stood at the front of this movement, treating their music as an artistic expression of their emotions and a serious reflection of their feelings. As a result, growing further away from their musical roots, the songs on the albums Help!, Rubber Soul and Revolver show a growing independency of style.



The studio years (1967-1968) (104-160). From 1967 on the Beatles operated as a studio group. A number of themes and techniques, Pollack writes, which appear with gathering momentum on their earlier albums and singles now can be seen to converge and blossom fully forth during this psychedelic musical season on albums like Sgt. Pepper's, Magical Mystery Tour, the White Album and Yellow Submarine



Get back (1969-1970) (161-195). In their last years as a recording group the final split of the group slowly becomes visible in the growing number of solo projects. As an antidote in January 1969 the Beatles initiated their Get Back project at the Twickenham Film Studios in London. Some of the results of this tribute to their roots are collected on the last albums Abbey Road and Let It Be. To his analyses of these songs Pollack adds his views on the two original songs on the recent Anthology CD's.



Extra: "I was nervously waiting ..." (196). On February 9th, 2000, Pollack completed his series of analyses of the Beatles' catalog. Here, interviewed by Ian Hammond, the author looks back on ten years and eight months of Beatles' studies.


Extra: The Quarrymen Sessions (197). The two unofficially released collections attributed to the Quarrymen, "Liverpool 1960" and "The Quarrymen At Home", are among the earliest extant recordings of the Pre-Beatles. As such they offer a rare glimpse into the repertoire and the musical capabilities of the group in its formative years. Here Pollack discusses all tracks of these recordings.


Extra: Can You Take Me Back (198). Allan Pollack's discussion of McCartney's short and untitled song fragment to be found on the White Album midbetween "Cry Baby Cry" and "Revolution #9".


Extra: The Percy Phillips Shellac (199). Many Beatles' recordings are extra-canonical, meaning they're falling outside the official Beatles' canon. Here Pollack analyses one of those recordings: the legendary 78rpm acetate demo of "That'll Be The Day" and "In Spite Of All The Danger", made by the Quarry Men at the Liverpool home studio of Percy Phillips in 1958, and the earliest extant recording made by John, Paul, George and some friends.



Extra: Notes on Three Simple Songs That Didn't Make It (200). Not all songs the Beatles recorded were released on their albums. Here Pollack analyzes three different but equally unlucky tracks from the Late-Early or Early Middle period that failed to make the grade: "Twelve-Bar Original", "If You've Got Trouble", and the cover song "Leave My Kitten Alone".


Extra: "Alternate" versions - which are the best? Answering a question from Steven Michael Maser, Pollack lists his favorite alternate versions of the Beatles' songs.




Copyright © 1989-2001 by Alan W. Pollack. All Rights Reserved. This article may be reproduced, retransmitted, redistributed and otherwise propagated at will, provided that this notice remains intact and in place.


These song analyses were published on The 'Official' rec.music.beatles Home Page. In case you want to quote these pages, please refer to the original sources. So for Pollack's remarks on "Free As A Bird" refer to: Pollack, Alan W. (1995), Notes on "Free As A Bird". Notes on ... Series no. 194, 1995. The 'Official' rec.music.beatles Home Page (http://www.recmusicbeatles.com).
Conversion to HTML by Ed Chen, Mike Markowski, Bruce Dumes, and Maurizio Codogno. Indexed and adapted for Soundscapes by Ger Tillekens.

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 6, 2009, 3:34:40 AM PST
Last edited by the author on Dec 6, 2009, 3:40:03 AM PST
fanofthefab4 says:
home authors |calendar colophon links newsgroups newsfeed new
volume 1

march 1999 A Beatles' Odyssey journal on media culture
ISSN 1567-7745

volumes
Volume 12 / 2009-2010 -
Volume 11 / 2008-2009 -
Volume 10 / 2007-2008 -
Volume 9 / 2006-2007 -
Volume 8 / 2005-2006 -
Volume 7 / 2004-2005 -
Volume 6 / 2003-2004 -
Volume 5 / 2002-2003 -
Volume 4 / 2001-2002 -
Volume 3 / 2000-2001 -
Volume 2 / 1999-2000 -
Volume 1 / 1998-1999 -
Editorials and Op-Eds -


databases
Alan W. Pollack's Notes On ... -
Markus Heuger's Beabliography -
Rare Pictures from Radio's Past -
Zeezender Discografie -


dossiers
Beatles Studies -
Comics and Cartoons -
History of Radio and Television -
Local and Global Radio -
Offshore Radio Stations -
Popular Music Studies -
Rock Song Anatomy -
Studies in Photography -
Theory and Methodology -


Alan W. Pollack's musicological journey through the Beatles' songs
by Ger Tilleken


In many ways the songs of the Beatles are exemplary for the musical innovations the British beat explosion wrought onto the domain of popular music in the sixties. With their music the British groups forged a highly original combination out of the erstwhile separate elements of other musical styles, which quickly evolved to become a full-blown style of its own: the music we nowadays know as pop or rock music. The Beatles stood at the front-lines of this artistic movement and their songs offer worthwhile material for those who want to know more about the musical characteristics of rock music. And, there's help for those who want to study these songs. Since 1989 everyone can look for assistance on the internet in the Notes on ... Series, written by the American musicologist Alan W. Pollack on each and every Beatles' song.




1 Chains of pan-diatonic clusters. Think yourself back to the city of London at the end of the year 1963 and meanwhile keep in mind that the virus of Beatlemania at that moment still was restricted to the British Isles and beat music was seen as music for adolescent boys and girls. Then and there only a few adults took the sound of the four Beatles seriously. Yet there were some who did and among them there was at least one real musicologist. If you had been there on the right day and you had bought the distinguished British paper The Times, out of the first hand you could have read an extensive musicological article devoted to the Beatles. This early assessment was full of praise for their musical accomplishments, but also phrased in a kind of learned musicological language that contrasted sharply with the self-concept of the rising youth culture. Read the next quote to know what the author heard in songs, most young people in those days just danced or sat down to listen to.

"Their noisy items are the ones that arouse teenagers' excitement. Glutinous crooning is generally out of fashion these days, and even a song about "Misery" sounds fundamentally quite cheerful; the slow, sad song about "That Boy", which figures prominently in Beatle programmes, is expressively unusual for its lugubrious music, but harmonically it is one of their most intriguing, with its chains of pan-diatonic clusters, and the sentiment is acceptable because voiced cleanly and crisply. But harmonic interest is typical of their quicker songs too, and one gets the impression that they think simultaneously of harmony and melody, so firmly are the major tonic sevenths and ninths built into their tunes, and the flat submediant key switches, so natural is the Aeolian cadence at the end of "Not a Second Time" (the chord progression which ends Mahler's "Song of the Earth")." [1]

2 From our Music Critic. "Chains of pan-diatonic clusters", "major tonic sevenths and ninths" and "Aeolian cadences", all these qualifications seem to be far removed from the daily experiences and expressive motives of the buyers of the early Beatles' records. Though the article was regarded as a kind of official recognition of popular music, many people - including the Beatles themselves - made fun of it. John Lennon himself mockingly said, he thought Aeolian cadences to be some kind of "exotic birds". The piece was neutrally signed "From our Music Critic", but is commonly ascribed to William Mann, the regular music critic of the London paper at that time. But whoever wrote the commentary, he was not the last serious musicologist trying to get hold of the musical peculiarities of the Beatles' songs. As rock music was to become a major cultural force, others were to follow.

3 Eight books and more ... In 1979 the British musicologist Wilfrid Mellers published his analyses in a full-length book Twilight of the Gods. It was followed by a whole series of other books, now coming from people who themselves grew up with rock music. In 1983 both Steven Porter's Rhythm and Harmony in the Music of the Beatles and Terence O'Grady's The Beatles: A Musical Evolution tried to get at the musicological core of the Beatles' musical innovations. In the same year in Germany Volkert Kramarz published his insightful Harmonie-analyse der Rockmusik, while Alexander Villinger tried to relate Die Beatles-songs to the musical tradition of the Classical and Romantic Styles. Some five years later Tim Riley wrote his telling insights down in Tell Me Why (1988) and shortly thereafter Heinz Bamberg made an in-depth comparison of several cover versions of the song "Money" by the Beatles and other British beat-groups in his Beatmusik (1989). More recently Allan Moore published his study of Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band (1997) in the prestigious Cambridge Music Handbook Series, parachuted right between studies of Bartók's Concerto for Orchesta and Beethoven's Ninth Symphony. This is just to name a few of the most important ones. But wait: there's yet another publication that unmistakably belongs in this series, though it is not published on paper, but on the internet.


4 If this guy ... In 1998 I myself earned my Ph.D. with again another book, about the early Beatles' songs, arguing their music signaled the beginnings of a completely new style of popular music, which was to become the style of nowadays pop and rock music. No, wait, that book is not on the internet and it certainly is not the book I want to talk about here. However, it is relevant in an indirect way. As I started to think about the book in the last months of 1994, I knew less than nothing about music theory - and even less about "pan-diatonic clusters" - and of course I leaned heavily on the books I mentioned above. As my book was the first academic book on this subject in the Netherlands, it got a lot of attention from the press as soon as it was published. Many reviewers were rather positive about the musicological analyses I made of the first fifty Beatles' songs. Some, however, expressed their doubts. Not even having read the book, someone for instance wrote the next critical comment in one of the major Dutch papers: "If this guy has not used Alan W. Pollack Notes on ... Series on the internet, he immediately must return his Ph.D. to his university." Luckily I had not overseen Pollack's work in my literature search, so I still have got my grade. In one respect, however, the remark was right at target. One cannot write about the music of the Beatles, without having read, next to some of the above books, also Pollack's analyses.

5 Two big hot buttons. Though Pollack is not the first to write about the Beatles' songs, his analyses are - in respect to the musicological aspects of the Beatles' repertoire - by far the most detailed ones. Each and every song gets the attention it deserves and Pollack never tires to explain the little details. It is clear, that he has put a great amount of work in it, and even so it did cost him a lot of time. His Notes on ... Series started in May 1989 - it now really is a ten year Odyssey - with a short note on "We Can Work It Out" and then it went on and on. It all began, Pollack writes himself, "... as a way of indulging two very big hot buttons: re-emerging Beatlemania on the threshold of middle age, and an ingrained hunger for playing the part of the ol' professor." The next button, Pollack confides, was pushed by D.L. MacLauchlan, who under the internet pseudonym of "saki" runs the rec.music.beatles.info newsgroup, and who double-dared him to write his views down for the newsgroup. Her invitation did work. To date there have been around 160 installments of the Notes on ..., varying in frequency of appearance, as Pollack says, "in a manner directly inverse to the pace of his combined family and professional life."

6 From ASCII to HTML. Pollack certainly is a fan of the Beatles, but he also has quite an amount of expertise in music theory. He knows what he is doing. He has a Ph.D. in music theory and composition (University of Pennsylvania, 1977) and he has taught these same subjects on the college level. For reasons he himself calls too personal and boringly complicated to go into, he's been working in the field of software engineering since 1978. Using the tools of his daily profession, Pollack wrote the originals as plain ASCII text files, using the Unix editor "vi". At first they were send as e-mail to the rec.music.beatles newsgroup on the internet. Next they were conversed to HTML by Ed Chen, Mike Markowski, Bruce Dumes, and Maurizio Codogno and published on The "Official" rec.music.beatles Home Page and now you can also read them on the pages of soundscapes. Many people already have read his notes, but - just like way back in 1963 - still not everyone is as happy with a musicologist dissecting the Beatles' songs with the tools of his trade.


7 Beatles' fans versus Classical Music Academia. "I've done the series as a labor of love for its own sake," Pollack tells us, "Yet, I've often felt like the results "fall between two stools" (a British expression for saying "it's neither here nor there")." He describes this uneasy position as follows: "The average Beatlemaniac doesn't have the musicological discipline with which to understand the notes, and my erstwhile academic buddies look down at me for not choosing a more worthy subject in which to invest my time. The chronic sticking points I run into with the pop culture crowd is the old saw about: "but these guys couldn't even read music, so how can you possibly attribute intellectual compositional motives to them?" At least in so-called Classical Music Academia, people understand that my style of analysis is a kind of after-the-fact linguistic analysis based on actual, vernacular usage. Trained musicologists understand that the theory books are based on the music of the great composers; not the other way around. My problem with the musicological establishment is their condescending attitude toward pop music per se."

8 Breaking all the rules. The arguments of those Beatles' fans who disagree with a musicological analysis of their favorite songs, are summing up to an impressive list. First and for all they say, the serious labor of study takes the fun out of the pleasure of listening to the music; next they argue it neglects the feelings of the listener and - above all - they hold the musicological approach to be far removed from the way the music was produced by the artists. The first two arguments seem to be irrelevant as they only concern the level of abstractness or directness of listening. Abstract or direct listening are just two different ways to listen to a song and both ways of listening can be pleasant as well as informative and one can easily shift between them. On the third point they, however, are absolutely right. Of course, the Beatles sought and found their way to their songs playing and improvising on their instruments. It's right, rock music was and is not designed from a theoretical perspective nor written out in advance on music sheets. More important even, the Beatles violated all existing musicological rules, trying to express their emotions with all musical means. One could even say that breaking the rules was the one big thing where the Beatles' songs were really all about. The Beatles used many chords, not resolving properly according to the teachings of "functional harmony" and there are, as Pollack calls them, a lot of "synthax errors" in the grammatical meaning of the harmonic order. However, just this aspect of the Beatles' songs shows the relevance of a musicological approach. Which where all those rules, how did the Beatles break them and and how did they, at the same time, succeed in keeping their songs understandable for their listeners? When you're trying to find some answers to these kinds of questions, musicology will lend a helping hand.


9 A punchlist of Beatles' trademarks. There's one last point often made against musicologists meddling with rock music: reducing rock productions to sheet music and musical notation misses the most important aspects, as rock songs have to be taken as recorded music in its unique combination of all the specific details of the performance by the artist. As far as this point of criticism goes, it certainly does not hold for Pollack. In his notes he takes the songs as they are recorded. He does not recur to sheet music, as he is analyzing them by ear. Thus far he has quoted only three books for reference: Lewisohn's (1988) extensive overview of the recording sessions, the text inventory of Campbell and Murphy (1980) and - in a critical sense - the works of Terence O'Grady (1983). In fact, each of his analyses itself is a most powerfull counter-argument by showing, that the musicological approach to rock music offers an insightful view into the musical innovations of the style of music that was initiated by the Beatles and their fellow musicians of the British beat explosion. In this respect Pollack's analyses are very usefull, as they have much to show of the intricacies of the Beatles' songs. Just like the main body of rock music, that was to develop in the wake of British beat explosion, the songs of the Beatles are very complex. In his essay on the cover songs on the album "Please Please Me" Pollack summarizes: "... the punch list of early Beatles musical trademarks: the tricky chord progressions, the pungent vocal harmonies, the clever word play etc." Let's take a short walk along the most important ones, just as they arise out of Pollack's studies.

10 Extended harmonic material. The Times' critic typified the Beatles' compositions as "harmonically intriguing" and, indeed, the first and most striking characteristic of the Beatles' songs is the use of extended harmonic material. Simply said the Beatles applied all kind of chords seemingly at random in their songs, thereby neglecting or varying at will on standard cadences. Many people still think pop songs are just simple three-chord songs, but that's really seldom the case. Even when a rock songs is built around only three chords, they're seldom the three basic chords. Let's start with those famous three basic chords: the tonic (I), the dominant (V), and the subdominant (IV). In musicological vernacular they are symbolized with roman numerals I, V and IV, indicating the tone steps. When we take for instance the C chord as the tonic I, then the dominant V is the G chord - counted five steps upward: C -» D -» E -» F -» G - and the F is the subdominant IV. Each of those chords consists of three tones. Figure 1 shows an example of the basic chords organized around the root note of C (I).













1999 © Soundscapes

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 6, 2009, 3:57:11 AM PST
fanofthefab4 says:
volume 1
march 1999 A Beatles' Odyssey journal on media culture
ISSN 1567-7745



databases
Alan W. Pollack's Notes On ... -
Markus Heuger's Beabliography -
Rare Pictures from Radio's Past -
Zeezender Discografie -


dossiers
Beatles Studies -
Comics and Cartoons -
History of Radio and Television -
Local and Global Radio -
Offshore Radio Stations -
Popular Music Studies -
Rock Song Anatomy -
Studies in Photography -
Theory and Methodology -


Alan W. Pollack's musicological journey through the Beatles' songs
by Ger Tillekens


In many ways the songs of the Beatles are exemplary for the musical innovations the British beat explosion wrought onto the domain of popular music in the sixties. With their music the British groups forged a highly original combination out of the erstwhile separate elements of other musical styles, which quickly evolved to become a full-blown style of its own: the music we nowadays know as pop or rock music. The Beatles stood at the front-lines of this artistic movement and their songs offer worthwhile material for those who want to know more about the musical characteristics of rock music. And, there's help for those who want to study these songs. Since 1989 everyone can look for assistance on the internet in the Notes on ... Series, written by the American musicologist Alan W. Pollack on each and every Beatles' song.



1

2




10 Figure 1 shows an example of the basic chords organized around the root note of C (I).


Figure 1: The standard chords (red): tonic (I), subdominant (IV) and dominant (V); and their relative minors (yellow): submediant (vi), supertonic (ii) and mediant (iii)

11 Relative and parallel minors. In figure 1 we have painted the basic chords red. Here we see, that the C chord consists of the tones: C, E, and G. We also notice that the subdominant F and the dominant G are neatly ordered on both sides of the tonic. In short there is some system to these three chords. There are also some chords colored yellow. These are the so-called relative minors. As the tonic C is built out of the notes C, E, and G, the building blocks of its relative minor vi (a-minor) are A, C, and E. You see both chords have two tones in common and that's why they are harmonically related. The same goes for C-Major and c-minor (i), which combines the tones of C, G, and E-flat. Because of the harmonic congeniality of these chords, one would expect, that they could easily be used together in one and the same composition. That's, however, not the case. The a-minor chord belongs to another key and the c-minor - though it has the same root as C-Major - threatens the key by its relation to notes such as E-flat. In the English language the c-minor chord is called the "parallel" minor of C-major. By the way, compared to the language of music itself the musicological vernacular is not very universal. Confusingly in German and Dutch relative minors are called parallel minors (respectively "moll Parallelle" and "parallelle mineuren").
12 Bimodal and trimodal keys. Breaking the rule of not mingling these relative and parallel chords was one of the things the Beatles really seemed to like. In their songs they treated the harmonic system freely as if the parallel and relative minors (and sometimes even their parallel and relative Majors) are "co-tonics". Many of their songs are erected on bimodal of even "trimodal" keys, with clusters of relative and parallel minors and Majors, e.g. the cluster of e minor and its relative Major E and its parallel Major G, or the combination of C, a minor and A Major. For that matter, this mix of Major and minor keys is just what the Aeolian cadence is all about. These combinations not only mean a break of the rules, but - more important - a conflict with the existing conventions and the expectations of listeners at the time of their first recordings.


Figure 2: The harmonic structure of the chords in the Beatles' songs

13 A diagonal tone matrix. In fact the Beatles systematically approached the harmonic grammar as if they always had several co-tonics ready at hand. From the tonic I, they as easily switch to the relative minor vi as its parallel major VI. A favorite is also the parallel minor i and its relative major, flat-III. This harmonic chord material is neatly ordered along the lines of the minor thirds (look at figure 2 and see why, in my book, I call it a diagonal tone matrix). In some of his early articles, it seems, Pollack's classical trained ears sometimes lead him astray on this point. In his analysis of "It Won't Be Long" for instance he calls the relative minor of the tonic a pseudo dominant, as indeed in the Classical Style it often is. Later on, however, he typifies the interchange between relative and parallel keys as one of the trademarks of the Beatles' songs. In his review of "Free As Bird" this characteristic for him is an important reason to treat this song as a real Beatles' song; and one has to agree with his arguments. Paging through Pollack's notes one finds many examples of these switches to these keys, and also of more accidental, "borrowed" chords from these related keys, like for instance the flat-VI - the "Peggy Sue" chord - in "I Saw Her Standing There". And, as Pollack shows over and over again, this play with different related keys is accentuated by the Beatles' preference of starting the intro in another key than the home key.

14 Harmony and melody. So why, you will say, all this fuzz about co-tonics? Well, there's one good reason: because the rules of functional harmonics forbids all too free access to them. Importing chords from other keys endangers the original key and threatens to make music sound false. It's here where the melodies of the Beatles play an important role as a powerfull antidote to the tonal ambiguity. Let's quote again The Times of 1963, where the music critic wrote: "... one gets the impression that they think simultaneously of harmony and melody (...)." That observation is unmistakably true and, sure enough, it is the second characteristic of the Beatles' songs as it emerges out of Pollack analyses. Regarding "Day Tripper", he writes for instance: "The melody of the voice parts is very difficult to sing, particularly without the underlying chords to keep you oriented; have you tried singing this song in the shower lately?" In this observation Pollack is as right as the music critic of The Times. The Beatles' songs have a special way of making melody and harmony go together and often it is the melody which tempts the listener to take the strange and wild chord progressions for granted. In his analysis Pollack tries to get at the overall musical flavor of each song, taking in regard all aspects of the music as recorded: harmony, melody, rhythm, overlayered dubs etcetera. But, rightly so, his studies give special attention to the interaction between harmony and melody as conveyed by inner voices, bass and lead guitar. In this context Pollack also introduces his readers to the concept of "false relations".
15 New and unexpected modulations. The third main characteristic of the Beatles' songs regards some intricate, highly original, and thus unexpected modulations or tone shifts. To analyze these Pollack uses the tools developed by the Austrian musicologist Heinrich Schenker. Schenker's analysis is based on so-called "Ur-Sätze". Simply said these "primal sentences" are recurrent cadences of just those chords which unmistakably belong to a certain key, like the tonic, the dominant and the subdominant (e.g. I -» V -» I), or those chords which role can be reduced to simple cadences like the chain of fifths. In a chain of fifths like II -» V -» I, the second step II - though not one of the basic chords - for instance is legitimate, because it can be interpreted as a secondary dominant, a "V-of-V". Otherwise, to account for other chords in a composition, one has to recur to modulations or tone shifts. To describe these modulations and shifts Schenker introduced a method of diagrams, which later on appeared very usefull for the analysis of jazz and rock music. The method also is a favorite of Pollack, as it reveals much of the Beatles' use of "co-tonics". But using related co-tonics, the Beatles also discovered some wilder modulations. As Pollack shows, these too can be made clear by means of Schenker diagrams. For an example, let's take a quick look at "From Me To You":

m.13
C: |I |vi |I |V |

m.17
C: |IV7 |vi |I V |I |

m.21
F: |ii |V7 |I |- |
C: |v |I7 |IV |- |

m.25
F: |VI7 |- |II |II+ |
C: |II7 |- |V |V+ |


16 A big departure. The example above starts in measure 13 on the second verse (notice the typical use of the relative minor (vi) in measure 14 and 18). Next the bridge or middle-eight starts in measure 21 with the words: "(I've got) arms that long to hold you". Here we find a surprising modulation a fifth downward from C Major to F Major, by way of the g-minor (v) which is "borrowed" from the parallel "co-tonic" of c minor. In his interview with Mark Lewisohn (1988: 10) Paul McCartney himself enthousiastically voiced it this way: "... that middle eight was a very big departure for us. Say you're in C then go to a-minor, fairly ordinary, C, change it to G. And then F, pretty ordinary, but then it goes [sings] "I got arms" and that's a g-minor. Going to g-minor and a C takes you to a whole new world. It was exciting."


Figure 3: Pivot modulation in "From Me To You" with an enharmonic change on g-minor (v)
17 Pivot chords. The g-minor itself is typical for the Beatles' usage of "co-tonics". Here, however, it also gives way to a modulation, which means the listener has to reorient to the new key after-the-event. The chord on which this reorientation happens to take place, is called a "pivot chord". Here Pollack identifies the C Major seventh in measure 22 as the pivot chord in question. First the C-Major chord undoubtedly is heard as the tonic. "But", as Pollack says, "once the bridge begins, the ear retrospectively reinterprets it as though it were the V of the key of F." In short the modulation turns the F chord into the tonic, while transforming the original tonic C into its dominant. It is indeed a whole new world, as we arrive from the world of C Major into the world of F Major. Here, as an extra to Pollack's analysis, we can add the observation that this pivot modulation also implies an enharmonic change (figure 3; see also the study of Volkert Kramarz, page 51-53). The g-minor of the middle eight really belongs to another musical continent, because in its role as the relative minor of B-flat the g-minor chord sounds slightly different from the g-minor that is the parallel minor of G. Though on instruments of even temperament both g-minors are played with exactly the same finger settings, one's ears have to adjust to the shift by bringing the chord in relation to the new key.

18 A complex of emotions. Next to the extended harmonic material, the interplay of melody and harmony and all the new modulations, there's a fourth characteristic element to be found in the Beatles' songs. That's the almost direct relationship between music and lyrics. In his notes Pollack often calls this aspect to the attention of his readers. In his analysis of "Things We Said Today" he for instance signals: "... the way in which the details of the music assist the words in the evocation of an otherwise difficult to verbalize complex of emotions." Again he is right, as the connectedness between words and chords seems to be a typical trait of all Beatles' songs. However, that's as far as his analysis of this crucial aspect of the Beatles' song goes. Moreover, though Pollack recognizes the originality of the Beatles songs, thus far he has written almost nothing about the question if the music of the Beatles represents a new style of popular music in its own right. But, it's yet too early for these kind of critical comments, as Pollack has not yet finished his notes.

19 Getting back. Reading Pollack's Notes on ... one learns almost everything there is to know of the Beatles' songs and even a lot about musicology, included the "major tonic sevenths and ninths" and "Aeolian cadences" mentioned in The Times' early review (except of course for the "chains of pan-diatonic clusters", which really were a literary invention flowing poetically out of the pen of "our Music Critic"). [2] Eventually Pollack intends to publish the completed set of his notes in the form of a book. "This will, of course", he warns us, "take a while, and I'm hardly thinking of quitting my day job in the meanwhile. I'm more than happy to share the work with the net as it emerges, but I will humbly ask you all for your courtesy in honoring my copyright of the material." He has now been away in Beatles' territory for ten years, a real Beatles' Odyssey. Unlike Ulysses, however, Pollack has not yet returned from his travels. But, rest assured, he will get back, as he wrote us recently: "I've put the series on hold for the last month or so because home life has been unusually hectic, but I'm excited about jumping into the "Get Back" period with both feet very soon. At the rate I'm going, I hope to complete this first pass on the songs within two years." Here at Soundscapes we will keep you informed about his progress.



Notes
1. One can read the full article in Michael Braun's fly-on-the-wall account of Beatlemania: Love Me Do. The Beatles' Progress. Harmondsworth: Penguin, 1964, 1995 reprint, pages 66-68.
2. In his notes on "Getting Better" Pollack (1995) himself describes the phrasing "pan-diatonic" as "a fancy way of saying that no notes appear anywhere in the song that are not native to the home key, and that they are all considered consonant amongst each other." This goes largely for "This Boy" (key: D Major). Only the added seventh in the sung harmonies (F#-A-B) over the b minor chord poses some problems to the definition of this song as "pan-diatonic", as it introduces a subtile dissonance.



References

Bamberg, Heinz (1989), Beatmusik. Kulturelle Transformation und musikalischer Sound. Pfaffenweiler: Centaurus 1989.

Braun, Michael (1964), Love Me Do! The Beatles Progress. London: Penguin Books, 1995.
Campbell, Colin, and Allan Murphy (1980), Things We Said Today. The Complete Lyrics and a Concordance to the Beatles' Songs, 1962-1970. Ann Arbor: Pierian Press, 1980.

Kramarz, Volkert (1983), Harmonie-analyse der Rockmusik. Von Folk und Blues zu Rock und New Wave. Mainz: Schott, 1983.

Lewisohn, Mark (1988), The Beatles Recording Sessions. The Official Abbey Road Studio Session Notes 1962-1970. New York: Harmony, 1988.

Mellers, Wilfrid (1976), Twilight of the Gods. The Beatles in Retrospect. London: Faber and Faber, 1976.

Moore, Allan (1997), The Beatles. Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1997.

O'Grady, Terence (1983), The Beatles: A Musical Evolution. Boston: Twayne, 1983.

Porter, Steven (1983), Rhythm and Harmony in the Music of the Beatles. Ann Arbor, Michigan: University Microfilms International, 1983.

Riley, Tim (1988), Tell Me Why. A Beatles Commentary. London: The Bodley Head, 1988.
Tillekens, Ger (1998), Het geluid van de Beatles. Amsterdam: Het...

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 6, 2009, 4:02:33 AM PST
fanofthefab4 says:
Copyright © 2000 by the Music Library Association, Inc. All rights reserved.
Notes 57.1 (2000) 157-159



Book Review
The Beatles as Musicians:
Revolver through the Anthology
Twentieth Century

The Beatles as Musicians: Revolver through the Anthology. By Walter Everett. New York: Oxford University Press, 1999. [xix, 395 p. ISBN 0-19-509553-7 (cloth); 0-19-512941-5 (pbk.). $65 (cloth); $24.95 (pbk.).]

This long-awaited book by popular-music scholar Walter Everett is the first work to [End Page 157] attempt a comprehensive historical, descriptive, and analytic discussion of compositions, finished or in sketch form, written by John Lennon, Paul McCartney, George Harrison, or Ringo Starr while they were collectively known as the Beatles. In its original version, the book covered the entire Beatles repertory, but at approximately three hundred thousand words (according to the author), the draft was too large to be published as a single volume. As a result, the present volume examines every opus written during the period from Revolver in 1966 through the breakup of the group in 1969/70--a period in which the maturation of the ensemble, as well as developments in recording technology, led to a proliferation of important and creative works. At this writing, Everett's book has gone through a second printing. A "prequel" volume, covering every composition written by the group from the time they were known as the Quarrymen to the album Rubber Soul, is scheduled for publication in late 2001; it will complete Everett's substantial contribution to popular-music and Beatles scholarship.

Everett sets the standard for popular-music analysis and research, partly because there has been a dearth of major studies that have treated this genre with the seriousness it deserves, but primarily because Everett's effort is so definitive and thorough. Wilfrid Mellers' Twilight of the Gods: The Beatles in Retrospect (London: Faber & Faber, 1973) is the only other work that has examined a similarly large number of Beatles compositions with a strong analytical emphasis, but that volume is largely descriptive, with analysis generally aimed at naming unusual chord functions and progressions. Everett, by contrast, discusses the historical background--he includes anecdotes that will be new even to knowledgeable fans--and the evolution of compositional process, with a revolutionary elevation of the recording studio as a primary compositional determinant. He also provides analysis of each composition, close examination of instrumentation, and an extensive bibliography. The Beatles as Musicians will be an invaluable resource for scholars in many different fields as well as for interested musicians and fans.

The book's chapters are largely organized around the albums, including singles that were originally released at the same time and later re-released on "cumulation albums." Chapter 1 encompasses the period of Revolver; chapter 2, Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band and Magical Mystery Tour; chapter 3, the White album; and chapter 4, Let It Be and Abbey Road. In addition, a "prelude" chapter summarizes pre-1966 accomplishments, an "interlude" examines the important singles "Strawberry Fields Forever" and "Penny Lane," and a "postlude" briefly covers the post-Beatles careers of the four musicians. At the beginning of the book is a helpful map of London that shows the locations of the Beatles' homes, recording studios, and commercial ventures (the Apple offices and boutique), as well as other significant landmarks. Each chapter opens with a time line marking important events such as studio work, releases of recordings, and other occurrences (e.g., the "Paul-is-dead" rumors). Appendix A summarizes the various instruments used by the Beatles, delineating technical capabilities and sound qualities (reported in even more detail in the text), and appendix B lists rock performers associated with the group. Everett also provides a glossary of terms and a table of chord functions; the latter recapitulates basic and unusual harmonies and cites examples of works in which they occur. The bibliography will be a valuable resource for the reader with little music background as well as the scholar seeking specific information on individual songs and their genesis in the recording studio.

As the basis for much of his discussion of Let It Be and Abbey Road, Everett relies on 967 films documenting intense rehearsal and composition at the Twickenham and Apple studios in January 1969; these films have been cataloged by Doug Sulpy and Ray Schweighardt in Drugs, Divorce, and a Slipping Image: The Unauthorized Story of the Beatles' "Get Back" Sessions (Princeton Junction, N.J.: The 910, 1994), but they are not easily accessible to the scholar who wishes to verify Everett's analyses. Another of Everett's main sources, more readily available than Sulpy and Schweighardt, is The Beatles: Complete Scores (London: Wise Publications; distributed in the U.S. by H. Leonard, 1993), a volume containing transcriptions of the Beatles' songs in complete score form. These transcriptions sometimes [End Page 158] do not agree with Everett's analyses even in fundamental elements such as key and instrumentation, a circumstance that leads the reader to wonder whether Everett has occasionally written out his own adjustments to the score but has not included these because of space constraints. For example, Everett interprets the opening of "If I Fell" in C# major (eventually III# of V in D major; an upper third mirrors the rising melodic third of the verses, D to F#) but does not inform the reader that the song is transcribed in Eb minor (pp. 27-29).

Numerous dense passages of analytic prose descriptions, often without voice-leading graphs or music examples, will be obscure to anyone who is not studying the compositions in great detail and at great length, preferably at a piano. Yet Everett more than compensates for this density with many brilliant and innovative explanations of technology-aided composition.

The Beatles as Musicians is the most authoritative work to date on the Beatles' music. In time, other scholars will offer more complete analyses of individual compositions, but they will first need to consider Everett's remarks with great care.

Steven Block
University of New Mexico

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 6, 2009, 4:07:55 AM PST
fanofthefab4 says:
Allmusic Blog


Overview Review Credits Chart & Awards Buy




Artist

The Beatles

Album

With the Beatles

Rating *****


Release Date

Nov 22, 1963

Label


Capitol Records

Time


32:24

Type


Enhanced

Genre Styles
Pop/Rock
Merseybeat
Rock & Roll
British Invasion
Contemporary Pop/ Rock
Early Pop/Rock
AM Pop


Moods Themes
Gleeful
Lively
Bright
Yearning
Sweet
Cheerful
Rollicking
Carefree
Playful
Rousing
Exciting
Fun
Innocent
Earnest
Witty
Warm
Exuberant
Acerbic
Bittersweet
Energetic
Poignant
Affection/ Fondness
Summertime
Playful
Spring
Party Time
Hanging Out


AMG Album ID

R 1503



Review by Stephen Thomas Erlewine

With the Beatles is a sequel of the highest order - one that betters the original by developing its own tone and adding depth. While it may share several similarities with its predecessor - there is an equal ratio of covers-to-originals, a familiar blend of girl group, Motown, R&B, pop, and rock, and a show tune that interrupts the flow of the album - With the Beatles is a better record that not only rocks harder, it's considerably more sophisticated. They could deliver rock & roll straight ("I Wanna Be Your Man") or twist it around with a little Latin lilt ("Little Child," one of their most underrated early rockers); Lennon and McCartney wrote sweet ballads (the achingly gorgeous "All I've Got to Do") and sprightly pop/rockers ("All My Loving") with equal aplomb; and the propulsive rockers ("It Won't Be Long") were as richly melodic as slower songs ("Not a Second Time"). Even George Harrison's first recorded song, "Don't Bother Me," is a standout, with its wonderfully foreboding minor-key melody. Since the Beatles covered so much ground with their originals, their covers pale slightly in comparison, particularly since they rely on familiar hits (only "Devil in Her Heart" qualifies as a forgotten gem). But for every "Roll Over Beethoven," a surprisingly stiff reading of the Chuck Berry standard, there is a sublime moment, such as Lennon's soaring interpretation of "You Really Got a Hold on Me," and the group always turns in thoroughly enjoyable performances. Still, the heart of With the Beatles lies not in the covers, but the originals, where it was clear that, even at this early stage, the Beatles were rapidly maturing and changing, turning into expert craftsmen and musical innovators.


Tracks




Title
Composer
Time

1 All I've Got to Do Lennon, Lennon, McCartney ... 2:02
Composed by: Lennon, Lennon, McCartney, McCartney, McCartney
Performed by: Beatles, Beatles


2 Don't Bother Me Harrison, Harrison 2:28
Composed by: Harrison, Harrison
Performed by: Beatles, Beatles


3 Till There Was You Willson, Willson, Willson 2:13
Composed by: Willson, Willson, Willson
Performed by: Beatles, Beatles


4 Roll Over Beethoven Berry, Berry 2:45
Composed by: Berry, Berry
Performed by: Beatles, Beatles


5 You've Really Got a Hold on Me Robinson, Robinson 3:01
Composed by: Robinson, Robinson
Performed by: Beatles, Beatles


6 Devil in Her Heart Drapkin, Drapkin, Drapkin ... 2:26
Composed by: Drapkin, Drapkin, Drapkin, Drapkin, Dropkin, Dropkin
Performed by: Beatles, Beatles


7 Money (That's What I Want) Bradford, Bradford, Bradford ... 2:51
Composed by: Bradford, Bradford, Bradford, Gordy, Gordy
Performed by: Beatles, Beatles



indicates Track Pick
indicates a click-through to a song review




Releases Other Editions
Year
Type
Label
Catalog #

1987 CD Capitol Records C2-46436
2007 CD Toshiba EMI 51112
2006 LP Parlophone Records 1206
1987 CS Capitol Records C4J-46436
Edition

Stereo

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 6, 2009, 4:13:53 AM PST
fanofthefab4 says:
The Evolution Of Rock Bass Playing MCartney Style By Dennis Alstrand

Home www.alstrand.com


Introduction

How Did He Become An Icon?

1966 Post Beatles

Thanks Pre-1963 1967

Five String Taste

Influential Bass Players of the '60s

1963

1968

Driving Rain

Large Scale vs. Small Scale Basses

1964/1965

1969


What Do Others Say? contact the author Bibliography

My thoughts on Paul's playing on John's songs

WHAT DO OTHERS SAY?


George Martin

" There's no doubt that Lennon and McCartney were good musicians. They had good musical brains, and the brain is where music originates - it has nothing to do with your fingers. As it happened, they could also play their own instruments very well.
And since those early days they've all improved, especially Paul. He's an excellent musical all-rounder, probably the best bass-guitarist there is, a first-class drummer, brilliant guitarist and competent piano player."



Sting

" It's hard to separate McCartney's influence on my bass playing from his influence on everything else-singing, songwriting, even becoming a musician in the first place. As a child, I would play my Beatles albums at 45 RPM so I could hear the bass better. He's the Guvnor."

Will Lee

" Growing up in Texas in the early '60s I was so obsessed with the Beatles' music that I didn't feel like a fan, I felt like I was in the Beatles. About the same time I switched from drums to bass I became aware of who gave the band its charm and personality, from visual tunes like "Penny Lane" to the group's repartee with the press. It was the same fellow who was able to take a poor-quality instrument like the Hofner bass and create magic on it. I especially dug Paul's funky, Motown-influenced side, evident in the bass line from Everybody's Got Something to Hide Except Me and My Monkey," or even in the syncopated part from "A Day In The Life.

Paul's influence on bassists has been so widespread over numerous generations that there's no denying he's in everybody's playing at this point. We're all descendants. He played simple and solid when it was called for. But because he had so many different flavors to add to a song, he was able to take the instrument far beyond a supportive role. Paul taught the bass how to sing."


Stanley Clarke

"Paul definitely had an influence on my bass playing, not so much technically, but more with his philosophy of melodic bass lines - especially as I hit my teens and the Beatles' records became more adventurous. On tracks like "Come Together," the bass line WAS the song. I've always liked that. The only other person I knew of who was doing that was James Jamerson. That was one of the reasons I was inspired to write "School Days": so I could just play the bass lines and people would hear a whole song.

I had the honor of being contacted by Paul through George Martin to play on Tug of War, and I also appeared on Pipes of Peace [both on Capitol]. Paul was very nice. He asked me to show him how to slap. During Pipes we got a groove going in a studio jam, and it ended up making on the album as "Hey Hey." He graciously gave me a co-writing credit, and it's still a thrill to see my name next to his above the music in the song book."

Billy Sheehan

" The reason I got involved with music in the first place was because I saw the Beatles on the Ed Sullivan Show. I watched all the girls going crazy, and I figured this was the best business in the world to be in. Later on, when I got more deeply into music, Sgt. Pepper was a break-through record for me. I must have listened to it several hundred times. What intrigued me was how totally musical every aspect of it was, especially Paul's melodic, fluid bass lines. When my band Talas was starting in the mid '70s, [the Beatles' tribute show] Beatlemania was big, and we used to play entire gigs of just Beatles tunes. I've learned so much from Paul about playing, writing, and playing and singing at the same time that I should probably start sending him checks.

Most bassists get into the flashy players, but I think the reason Paul is often overlooked is that what he was doing wasn't really obvious. It was so brilliantly woven into the context of the songs. One of my favorites is the bass line from "Rain." I still use it to test the low end of an amp. That Paul happens to play bass is a great boon to all of us, because he made us realize that there are no limitations to being a bass player."



John Lennon

"Paul was one of the most innovative bass players ever. And half the stuff that is going on now is directly ripped off from his Beatles period."

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 6, 2009, 4:16:45 AM PST
[Deleted by Amazon on Dec 6, 2009, 10:46:03 AM PST]

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 6, 2009, 4:22:19 AM PST
fanofthefab4 says:
Windy City Wingman Lays Roots With Wilco Bass Player 2005


In the family tree of alternative country-rock, John Stirratt's roots go deep. When he got the call in 1993 to take over bass duties from singer/ songwriter Jeff Tweedy in alt-country supergroup Uncle Tupelo, he began a working relationship with Tweedy that led to Wilco, one of the genre's greatest success stories. It's a tale marked by multiple personnel changes and high-drama record-label relations-the band was dropped from its label, Reprise, after delivering tapes for what would become 2002's Yankee Hotel Foxtrot. The making of that watershed album is the subject of Sam Jones's documentary film I Am Trying to Break Your Heart.

Amid the changes, Stirratt's warm tone and dynamic fingerstyle and pickstyle attack have formed the foundation of Wilco's seven albums (including two with singer Billy Bragg), which have ranged from raw and rootsy (1995's A.M.) to richly textured and intricate (Yankee Hotel Foxtrot). The band's latest, A Ghost Is Born, witnesses Stirratt at his best, especially on the loping bass-driven single "Handshake Drugs." Stirratt's thumpy pickstyle line-played on a flatwound-strung Hofner-forms a balanced countermelody to Tweedy's throaty vocals. Elsewhere, Stirratt's playing is more staid and supportive, especially on the driving "Spiders (Kidsmoke)," an homage to Krautrock duo Neu!. With Jeff Tweedy at the helm and Stirratt in the engine room, the Chicago-based six-piece is currently touring with guitarist Nels Cline, drummer Glenn Kotche, keyboard player Mikael Jorgensen, and multi-instrumentalist Pat Sansone. When he is not touring or recording with Wilco, John plays with the Autumn Defense-a band formed with longtime friend Sansone-and with his twin sister in their group, Laurie & John.

Credit: Zoran Orlic

John Stirratt plays half the time with his fingers, the other half with a heavy-gauge Planet Waves pick. When he's playing fingerstyle, he keeps the pick tucked under his pinkie and ring fingers so it's easy to access. "I play with my right hand pretty close to the neck," Stirratt explains, "and when I'm picking, I mute the strings a lot with the heel of my hand. In the studio, I put sponges or Styrofoam near the bridge to mute the strings so there's no sustain."

You and Jeff are the only original members of Wilco. How has your playing changed with the various lineups?

We were a four-piece in our previous incarnation, so I felt naked at times. I love having all of the musical information to feed off in this bigger ensemble. With the bigger group, my playing has gotten a lot more melodic, because in a smaller setting, my role is to just hold it down. Now I've got more room to move around, and I don't have to stay on the root as much, because chances are someone else is covering it.

Wilco has always been a band of multi-instrumentalists. Do you ever share bass duties?

On Yankee Hotel Foxtrot and the new album, we had Leroy Bach in the band, and he's a fantastic bass player-he played on a few tracks, like the ones with bowed upright. In Wilco we've always been generous about passing instruments around-I've done a lot of the basic tracks on piano or guitar. Having a different voice in the low end from track to track is great. On arabella, my sister and I had a fantastic bass player from Nashville, Brad Jones, on upright and electric. He plays a Gibson EB-2 and a Gibson Les Paul Studio bass through a SansAmp; he's got a fluid, growly style.

What is the greatest strength you bring to Wilco?

I think I can hear what songs need. In learning to be a songwriter and singer first and foremost, I've come to realize the bass's responsibility. Also, Jeff and I have been singing together for so long, I bring a lot of harmony to the band. That's a big part of it, for sure. Over the years, the harmonies were either written by me or by [former Wilco bandmate] Jay Bennett. He's an inventive writer of harmony and countermelodies and I learned a lot from playing with him.

Which bass players have had the most impact on your playing?

Paul McCartney is one of the greatest bass players of all time. If you listen to what he was tracking live in the studio, it's unbelievable. With his tone and musicality, he was a huge influence. He covered all his harmonic responsibilities really well, but his lines were absolutely melodic and inventive. Also, Rick Danko of The Band was a huge influence on me. I love the idea of a bassist providing the high vocal harmony.

What is your favorite song to play live?

"Hummingbird" has great changes, and it's one of the most inventive pop arrangements we've done, so that's fun to play as an ensemble. On the other hand, there's "Spiders (Kidsmoke)," which basically has a one-note line for the whole ten minutes. But there's a whole world of dynamics that I explore with that song. Every stage is different, and by playing with dynamics, you can turn the stage itself into an instrument. It's fun to see how that song works in different spaces night-to-night. It really has a life of its own.



Bass Player is a trademark of New Bay Media, LLC. All material published on www.bassplayer.com is copyrighted @2009 by New Bay Media, LLC. All rights reserved

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 6, 2009, 4:25:12 AM PST
fanofthefab4 says:
Still relevant after decades, the Beatles set to rock 9/9/09
Story Highlights

9/9/09 a big day for The Beatles

"Rock Band" video game and remastered albums both to be released

Apple Inc. expected to make "music-related" announcement the same day

Expert compares The Beatles to Picasso, says their music will endure
By Doug Gross

(CNN) -- "Number nine. Number nine. Number nine."

The repetitive refrain from one of The Beatles' most mind-bending journeys into psychedelia -- "Revolution 9," the audio pastiche from "The White Album" -- is now serving as the backbeat of a big day for the biggest band in rock 'n' roll history.

On Wednesday -- 9/9/09 -- remastered versions of the Beatles catalogue will be released, giving listeners what the remaining members of "The Fab Four" say is the closest reproduction ever of how their music sounded in the studio.

The same day, the video game "The Beatles: Rock Band" is set to be released by Harmonix. Modeled after the already popular "Rock Band" game, and closely supervised by The Beatles and their estates, the game lets players sing and strum along on a huge list of Beatles classics over scenes ranging from Liverpool's Cavern Club to their final performance on a London rooftop.

And on top of that, there's rampant speculation that a planned "music-themed" announcement by Apple Inc., also scheduled on 9/9/09, could involve the supergroup.

The Beatles are one of a handful of groups whose music has never been approved for sale by Apple's iTunes, and the timing of the announcement has fueled speculation that could finally change -- or even that specialized Beatles iPods, like the ones sold in 2004 loaded with U2's music, could be in the works.

It's a remarkable amount of buzz for a band whose roots stretch back nearly five decades. And it's a clear sign, observers say, that through time and a multitude of cultural shifts, the group's hold on the public's imagination has endured.

"People are still looking at Picasso. People are still looking at artists who broke through the constraints of their time period to come up with something that was unique and original," said Robert Greenfield, a former associate editor at Rolling Stone magazine who has written about the band. "In the form that they worked in, in the form of popular music, no one will ever be more revolutionary, more creative and more distinctive than The Beatles were."

Research shows that more than 40 years after their last public performance, Paul McCartney, John Lennon, George Harrison and Ringo Starr's music remains as interesting to young people now as it ever was.

A Pew Research survey released last month showed that 81 percent of respondents between ages 16-29 said they liked The Beatles. Eleven percent said they dislike the band and only 4 percent said they have never heard of them.

By comparison, current rockers Coldplay received 39 percent positive responses, with 45 percent saying they'd never heard of them. Forty-two percent said they like hip-hop star Kanye West.

"To put this in perspective: Try imagining young adults back in the 1960s putting the big jazz bands of the roaring '20s at the top of their list of favorites," the survey reads. "Not very likely."

Walter Everett, professor and chairman of music theory at the University of Michigan, said his students know The Beatles catalogue as well today as they would have 30 years ago.

He said the cultural phenomenon that was The Beatles -- the frenzy-inducing early concerts, the furor when John Lennon said the group was "more popular than Jesus," the pre-Internet obsession over "Paul is dead" rumors -- made them something more than just another rock group.

"They were just idolized," said Everett, who has written several books on the band. "It was a musical revolution, but [also] the hair, the clothing, their attitude about the establishment, their support of everybody, young and old alike, to try to understand each other at a very difficult time.

"Some of that message endures."

But at the heart of the phenomenon, experts agree, is the music. From the charming, school-boy bop of "I Want To Hold Your Hand" to the blistering assault of "Helter Skelter," the songs, they say, were just that good.

"The point is how great the music is," Greenfield said. "It isn't about the fact that The Beatles were willing to practice and get better at what they did -- it was the fact that that band contained at least two-and-a-half geniuses [Lennon, McCartney and, at times, Harrison]."

Wednesday's announcements -- and, in Apple's case, possible announcement -- show that the minders of The Beatles legacy are keeping up with how today's music consumers behave, said Bruce Burch, director of the University of Georgia's music business program.

"A lot of bands and artists have been slow to embrace the fact that technology is driving the industry," Burch said. "Their music is not going away and this is a step for them for their music to come into the 21st century."

EMI, which will be releasing the remastered recordings, has been famously protective of The Beatles brand and music. Digital reproductions like MP3s have lower sound quality than albums or compact discs -- one of the reasons they've been slow to embrace iTunes.

But if an announcement on that front is coming, Burch said, it would signal an acknowledgement that such quality-control concerns may be obsolete for the majority of the music-buying public.

"It's just a different audience out there," he said. "They're used to listening on ear buds. The sound quality, in some cases, maybe isn't' as important to them."

Everett said that, even with all of the news expected Wednesday, the Beatles music will no doubt remain popular for decades to come -- meaning more new wrinkles are almost certain.

"There's still more that can be done," he said. "Who knows where technology may be in another 10 years? We may have holographic images."

And regardless of how it's delivered, no one's expecting another band to ever eclipse the four lads from Liverpool who would go on to shape popular culture the world over.

"There will probably be another artist that comes along and captures the imagination," Burch said. "But it will never be like The Beatles."

All AboutThe Beatles * Rock Band (Video Game)



Find this article at:
http://www.cnn.com/2009/SHOWBIZ/Music/09/04/beatles.999/index.html





Check the box to include the list of links referenced in the article.



© 2008 Cable News Network

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 6, 2009, 4:31:38 AM PST
[Deleted by Amazon on Dec 6, 2009, 10:47:04 AM PST]

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 6, 2009, 6:30:08 AM PST
DK Pete says:
fan of...I don't think it's foolish or ignorant to dislike an artist. It's all a matter of personal taste and I don't think that this is something which is arguable. What I DO think is foolish and/or ignorant is that despite ones personal opinion, they don't have the willingness to acknowledge the greatness/talent of that artist regardless of their personal feelings towards them and their art. Small example...with the exception of a handful of songs, I-personally-find Billy Joel very unappealing. At the same time, I realize that he his a great craftsman when it comes to songwriting and especially storytelling. I can clearly understand why he touches as many people as he does...yet, he is not for me. So..is Billy Joel one of the "greats" of our time? Yes, he is..just not in my own little world.

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 6, 2009, 12:48:29 PM PST
Norcs says:
And this is the sole reason that I will not enter into further dialogue with you!! How on earth can you not like Led Zeppelin or Pink Floyd??? The Floyd were a million times more progressive and innovative than the beatless!!!! You are exactly the kind of beatless fanatic that makes my skin crawl. Take off the ear muffs and listen to more than this durge.

I won't read any more of your posts and you will never be able to teach me anything, I do know my own mind. Glad that i got up your nose though!!!

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 6, 2009, 12:59:28 PM PST
[Deleted by Amazon on Dec 6, 2009, 2:57:08 PM PST]
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