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Customer Discussions > Classical Music forum

Dark Classical Music


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Showing 1-25 of 64 posts in this discussion
Posted on Dec 28, 2012, 10:23:21 PM PST
MF says:
Ligeti's Requiem (if it has not already been mentioned) is as genuinely 'dark' a piece of music as any I have heard. Penderecki's St Luke's Passion and his Requiem also comes to mind.

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 28, 2012, 7:55:36 PM PST
Last edited by the author on Dec 28, 2012, 7:56:12 PM PST
Soucient says:
Jah, Freulich! "Der Leiermann."

Posted on Dec 28, 2012, 6:20:48 PM PST
Neaklaus says:
I would add the Mahler Symphony no. 6 to this list. There are many of Mahler's songs and lieder that start out sounding light but end up dark. Many of Shuberts lieder are also dark stories.

Posted on Dec 28, 2012, 4:02:45 PM PST
Soucient says:
Ditto re "Curlew River."

Posted on Dec 28, 2012, 11:49:28 AM PST
Joe Anthony says:
Britten's "Curlew River" is a dark Christian allegory. It deals with the death of a child, and the mother who has gone mad (to be portrayed by a tenor in drag). It is supposed to be performed in a church; but it is a dark work; touching upon a morbid and tragic kind of medieval Christianity.

Posted on Dec 28, 2012, 10:49:28 AM PST
<<<Do not buy Gergiev's - it will put you to sleep with its dullness.>>
actually, this can be said about most of Gergiev's recordings......
esp those operas that sadly no one else seems to record.

prokofiev's 'war and peace' should not be a snooze fest.

Posted on Dec 28, 2012, 9:59:03 AM PST
Last edited by the author on Dec 28, 2012, 9:59:35 AM PST
Chris L says:
Hi Ahmad ,
but you are still here in mind ... so the remainder of the symphony must have returned you to sanity !
More seriously , yes , I agree there is something extraordinary in the end of that movement.

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 28, 2012, 9:54:22 AM PST
Last edited by the author on Dec 28, 2012, 9:57:49 AM PST
Ahmad says:
Chris,
The last few minutes towards the end of the 1st movement of the 8th symphony.. I feel like loosing my mind during those last few minutes...

Posted on Dec 28, 2012, 9:50:16 AM PST
Last edited by the author on Dec 28, 2012, 9:55:46 AM PST
Chris L says:
Shostakovich's 8th symphony has a dark and brooding 1st movement and 4th movement ,
and its 3rd movement should be heard by almost every metal-head !

The best performance currently on CD is Mravinsky's Leningrad Philharmonic live in UK released on a BBC label ,
-{the one in the Link posted by Larry Vandesande in the first post on this page}-
and that betters his later live performance released variously by Philips , Regis , Alto.
The sound of the BBC is stereo and quite good ,
though if you want modern sound then get Jansons' Pittsburgh recording on EMI.
This is also a live concert , and is a blistering performance of the 3rd movement , and awesome in the 4th ,
though Jansons does not get to the depth of the 1st movement in the way that Mravinsky does.
{Do not buy Gergiev's - it will put you to sleep with its dullness.}

If you like the 8th then next listen to his 10th - Jansons on EMI if you want power ,
but Sanderling's Berlin recording on Berlin Classics if you want to hear authenticity and don't mind an older sound.

Posted on Dec 28, 2012, 8:29:34 AM PST
Joe Anthony says:
Mahler's "Song's On the Death of Children"

I read that some sopranos refuse to sing it while their children are young.

Posted on Dec 27, 2012, 8:15:39 PM PST
Soucient says:
Rachmaninov's "Isle of the Dead." More somber than thou!

Posted on Dec 27, 2012, 6:51:37 PM PST
Last edited by the author on Dec 27, 2012, 6:57:17 PM PST
Sancta Susanna

I have mentioned this one act before.....maybe even in this thread.
It deals with a sexually obsessed/repressed suicidal nun who gets buried alive by other nuns.....
a theme which is now a staple of modern entertainment but for the early '20s...

Posted on Dec 27, 2012, 6:47:05 PM PST
Shostakovich String Quartet No. 8
Gesualdo Tenebrae Responsoria: Gesualdo: Tenebrae
Bartok 6 String Quartets

Posted on Dec 27, 2012, 2:17:05 PM PST
Last edited by the author on Dec 27, 2012, 2:34:03 PM PST
Shostakovich Symphony 8 is about totalitarianism. Its prevailing darkness is only interrupted by the ending.

Bolcom's Black Host is a good Halloween piece but darker than most think of for that occasion.

Anton Webern's symphony and pieces for orchestra will unnerve most people.

Posted on Dec 27, 2012, 12:38:36 PM PST
WH says:
This is an intriguing old thread. Given that the original question came from a death-metal listener, I'm kind of surprised by how un-dark many of the suggestions were. They're not "death-metal" dark. The recommendation of Bartok's String Quartet #5 certainly fits the bill in some ways. I would certainly second the recomendation of Rautavaara's "Angels and Visitations." I'm surprised no one mentioned Stravinsky's Rite of Spring:
Gustavo Dudamel / Simon Bolivar Youth Orchestra of Venezuela: Rite- Stravinsky: Le Sacre du Printemps / Revueltas: La Noche de los Mayas (Deutsche Grammophon, 2010).

A few others:
1. George Crumb: Black Angels: performance by the Kronos Quartet (Nonesuch)
2. Gyorgy Ligeti: György Ligeti Edition 3: Works for Piano (Etudes, Musica Ricercata) - Pierre-Laurent Aimard (Sony). Check out especially Book 2: "L'escalier du diable" ("The Devil's Ladder").
3. Gyorgy Ligeti: The Ligeti Project II: Lontano / Atmosphères / Apparitions / San Francisco Polyphony / Concert Românesc - Berlin Philharmonic Orchestra / Jonathan Nott. Check out: "Atmospheres" (used by Kubrick in the scary climax of "2001: A Space Odyssey").
4. Alfred Schnittke: Schnittke: Piano Quintet / String Trio (Naxos)

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 27, 2012, 11:49:35 AM PST
This is rather virtual orchestra (electronic) music, yet with a classic appeal, but it certainly has its dark, haunting and bombastic qualities:

The Invisible War: Ego=God
Ego=God

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 27, 2009, 8:30:13 AM PDT
Mondoro says:
Dale, I would add to this list the Adagio from Mahler's 10th and the finale of Tchaikovsky's Pathetique for a really depressing listening experience

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 27, 2009, 4:26:06 AM PDT
Balok says:
I think that 1593 is thinking of Frere Jacques.

Posted on Jul 25, 2009, 6:54:18 PM PDT
John Ruggeri says:
alaskan glam-metal-head

Richard Strauss' Opera- Elektra is no laugher. The music is as dense and troubled as is the story itself and the character of Elektra.
The opera ends with Elektra dancing herself to death.

Regards-John

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 25, 2009, 5:13:31 PM PDT
Dmitri says:
Shostakovich Viola Sonata (1975): Instrumentation: viola and piano:-)

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 25, 2009, 4:49:12 PM PDT
David Liu says:
I didn't see any mention of the Shostakovich viola sonata, written on his deathbed. The 3rd mvt is especially haunting.
-----
If it was written on his deathbed, does that mean that the tuba players have to stand during a performance?

Posted on Jul 25, 2009, 2:55:23 PM PDT
Last edited by the author on Jul 25, 2009, 2:56:37 PM PDT
M. Zehnder says:
Mumma's Megaton, written for William Burroughs, is another piece in the same vein of Penderecki's Threonody; it doesn't get much more menacing then something like that I imagine...

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 25, 2009, 2:52:06 PM PDT
Dmitri says:
"Three Blind Mice" isn't in Mahler's 1st it's in Dvorak's 9th.

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 25, 2009, 2:50:00 PM PDT
1593 says:
I like the "three blind mice" in a minor key in Mahler's 1st, third movoment. It is dark, somber and funny at the same time.

Posted on Jul 25, 2009, 4:02:37 AM PDT
David Liu says:
I didn't see any mention of the Shostakovich viola sonata, written on his deathbed. The 3rd mvt is especially haunting.
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Discussion in:  Classical Music forum
Participants:  39
Total posts:  64
Initial post:  Jul 21, 2009
Latest post:  Dec 28, 2012

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