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Customer Discussions > Classical Music forum

To remember P. I. Tchaikovsky + Nov. 6, 1893


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Showing 1-12 of 12 posts in this discussion
Initial post: Nov 6, 2012, 9:51:08 AM PST
Edgar Self says:
Tchaikovsky, the great melodist and leading Russian composer, died on this date in 1893, only 53, and in circumstances that have led to speculation, just days after conducting the premiere of his "Pathetique" symphony. Unhappy man. great composer, also modest, and of great help to Rachmaninoff at the start of his career.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 6, 2012, 11:30:47 AM PST
Danish conductor Thomas Dausgaard has just released a recording of Tchaikovsky's 6th symphony with his Swedish CHAMBER Orchestra on Bis. What we see now is these hipsters moving into new terriotory... It gets a mixed review today on Classics Today -- the reviewer says it would have sounded better if played by a bigger orchestra and is also questioning the idea of little to no vibrato.

I'm lucky to actually have heard Thomas Dausgaard conduct Tchaikovsky's 4th symphony with a BIG modern orchestra live five minutes away from where I live in Copenhagen and where Dausgaard was the big cheese at the time (could have been his last concert - don't remember) and it sounded great to me (but I have a weakness for the 4th - glad that march eliot has now joined the fan club!).

Here is the review by Victor Carr Jr. (who is senior if I may ask?):
http://www.classicstoday.com/review/a-bare-bones-tchaikovsky-pathetique/

A big happy birthday to Piotr!

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 6, 2012, 11:46:32 AM PST
Last edited by the author on Nov 6, 2012, 11:47:13 AM PST
KenOC says:
Rasmus, the only thing I have by Dausgaard is his set of the Berwald symphonies. Quite fine!

And to Pyotr, a tip o' the hat and a thanks.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 6, 2012, 11:51:25 AM PST
Ken

Dausgaard's recording of Beethoven's Ninth Symphony is my favorite of them all - although I would never let go of Karajan DG 70s or Hogwood or Gunter Wand... or... or... or...

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 6, 2012, 12:26:37 PM PST
MacDoom says:
Edgar, you're confusing them now. Tchaikovsky wasn't modest at all - that was Mussorgsky.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 6, 2012, 12:33:45 PM PST
Last edited by the author on Nov 6, 2012, 12:34:44 PM PST
Edgar Self says:
Wouter -- Well, it could have been Tchaikovsky's brother Modeste.

Tchaikovsky showed his modesty by asking young Rachmaninoff if he would mind sharing a double bill with short operas by them both. And he gave Rachmaninoff top billing.

I've already suggested to Rasmus on another thread that, to be completely authentic, the conductor should drink cholera-infected water and die a weak later, leaving grief, alarums, and rife speculation. erhaps some of the players and audience could ... but no, that would be overdoing things.

Posted on Nov 6, 2012, 1:35:10 PM PST
Last edited by the author on Nov 6, 2012, 1:35:28 PM PST
Dmitri says:
Happy Birthday Tchaikovsky! I am surprised DMP hasn't left some remarks. He is the man for Tchaikovsky.

Posted on Nov 6, 2012, 8:06:07 PM PST
Aleksey says:
Happy birthday, then, to one of the really great ones.

Talking about Dausgaard's Tchaikovsky, it doesn't sound like my preference for sure, but ultimately . . . why not?

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 7, 2012, 3:42:30 AM PST
Aleksey

I may not believe this, but they also recorded a Bruckner symphony - yes, Bruckner with a chamber orchestra:
Bruckner: Symphony No. 2

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 7, 2012, 5:47:30 AM PST
Last edited by the author on Nov 7, 2012, 5:48:01 AM PST
Edgar

Yes, the authentic thing can be hilarious when taking to extremes. One example that always makes me laugh: violinist Sigiswald Kuijken (whom I admire very much) on his second solo Bach recordings insisted on having the booklet printed with Bach's misspelled tempo designations!

Posted on Nov 7, 2012, 6:42:38 AM PST
Last edited by the author on Nov 7, 2012, 6:54:25 AM PST
Skaynan says:
Piso: By "speculation" I believe you are referring to Tchaikovsky's cause of death, right? Cholera (the official story) as opposed to Him being homosexual, got discovered, and was forced to take his own life or face the shame of exile and disgrace.

I was under the impression that this "controversy" has been settled: that digging in the Russian archives when they became public (after the breakdown of the Soviet Union) had uncovered letters and other documents that assert the second option (homosexual) as the real reason. My source for this is Robert Greenberg. Did you hint upon that? Do you think it's true?

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 7, 2012, 8:33:12 AM PST
Last edited by the author on Nov 7, 2012, 8:33:35 AM PST
Edgar Self says:
Slaynan -- I also thought the controversy over the cause of Tchaikovsky8's death was settled, but the other way, i.e. accepting drinking cholera-tainted water accieentally or heedlessly. My recollection is that there was no convincing proof otherwise. Tchaikovsky's brother Modeste was cited in corroboration. Contributor DMP would know, and has laid out the facts before, I believe.
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Discussion in:  Classical Music forum
Participants:  7
Total posts:  12
Initial post:  Nov 6, 2012
Latest post:  Nov 7, 2012

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