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Customer Discussions > Cooking forum

Old Cookbooks


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Showing 201-225 of 407 posts in this discussion
Posted on Jul 8, 2012, 8:31:36 AM PDT
A. Lyons says:
Over a hundred here in Maryland today so I'm making cold salads that will keep for a couple of days.

One container of cottage cheese, a couple of teaspoons of mayo, pepper, garlic powder and lots of my favorite chopped veggies. Stir and store until needed. I don't put in mushrooms as they get soggy and I do drain the tomatoes. This is good to stuff in large hollowed out tomatoes to serve for lunch.

I also make a great pasta salad that keeps using all my favorite things that go into a Greek salad such as Kalamada olives, cucumbers, Feta Cheese, tomatoes, purple onion, and I pour a bit of Italian dressing over the noodles while warm and then when it cools down I add the rest of the items.

Mama always kept a large cooked ham in the fridge and she'd take the bits and pieces and run them through her food grinder and and then add pickle relish to it and mayo and it was so good on crackers with iced tea. No AC in those days.

Salmon salad. I take a can of salmon and pick out the yucky bits and then sprinkle lemon juice on it and add pepper and dill weed. I mix it with cooked Yukon Gold potaote pieces and add mayo and you have a nice summer salad.

I also take one can of mixed vegetables and one smaller can of chopped beets and drain them and put them in a bowl with chopped red onion, dill weed, diced dill pickle and some pepper and mayo. Yum.

I hope these recipes help out on these hot summer days! ENJOY!

Posted on Jul 8, 2012, 11:07:04 AM PDT
I love all of my old cookbooks, better homes and gardens from the 50's (2 copies from different years because my first one was a little beat up when I got it from a neighbor, so my husband got me a newer looking one for my birthday). My favorite one though, I hardly ever open, it is a president's wives cookbook from my grandmother. The recipes are difficult to make though because it was pre-electric oven. Every recipe has directions for how hot to get the fire and what type of wood to use. Some even state how long or thick the wood should be. It has pictures for how to set a table which we reference often. I think I found it for my kindle here The Whitehouse Cookbook (1887) Cooking, Toilet and Household Recipes, Menus, Dinner-Giving, Table Etiquette, Care of the Sick, Health Suggestions, Facts ... Cyclopedia of Information for the Home

My daughter loves to make different foods using all of our cookbooks as well. I love being able to get in the kitchen with her.

We also raise our own animals like chicken, duck and rabbit. I hope my kids are as tortured by the butcher process as others seem to be. I think it is so important that my kids know where our food comes from. We waste a lot less when we raise our own animals because we know the work and life involved in making that food. Hopefully they will take those lessons with them wherever they go and eat only what is necessary, and not waste food.

Posted on Jul 8, 2012, 11:12:17 AM PDT
Last edited by the author on Jul 8, 2012, 11:20:09 AM PDT
Anne says:
I've always collected different old recipe collection books from places I've travelled, when I see them, and picking judiciously, and I look for these from different areas in used bookstores at home, too. Usually it's Junior League and different ladies' club publications over the church ones just because they are usually from-scratch, geared more towards entertaining, so the recipes are the tried and true 'company' ones instead of the quick casseroles made with soup and veg-all, etc.

My mom made a yellow squash casserole with soup, sour cream and Pepperidge Farms stuffing mix. Today it is one of my go-to recipes, with some revisions. I add a zucchini to the yellow squash and onions as I cook them, then delete the soup, add more sour cream, add a drained can of artichokes, chopped, some fresh herbs, and some shredded carrots to the stuffing and squash. It really tastes better without the Campbell's.

Posted on Jul 8, 2012, 11:25:45 AM PDT
A.Lyons, your cottage cheese recipe sounds so good. Think I'm make that as part of our dinner tonight.

Thinking about making a macaroni salad of some kind too. Now that I got one of those micro wave pasta cookers there's no extra heat added to the kitchen from boiling the water and on a day like today, that's a wonderful thing.

Speaking of old cookbooks, I'm in the mood for that jello salad my mother used to make .... but I think she made it with unflavored (Knox) gelatin and ?????? added for flavoring. It had shredded cabbage in it and she served a sauce on the side.
Can't even remember if I liked it or not......but I want some. Will have to call my sister for the recipe because I gave all of our mom's cookbooks to her for safe keeping.

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 8, 2012, 3:07:24 PM PDT
My Mom used to make lime Jello with shredded carrots in it. It tasted like coconut. One of the few Jello's I would eat. Otherwise I eschew Jello! Don't know what to do with it in my mouth, so got a lot of ribbing over the years once it became known that I DO NOT EAT JELLO. (I do, however, cook with it in other forms - - add a box to the flour in a cake mix to get a nicely flavored/colored cake - - or in cookies! (shortbread?) Maybe even some candy.)

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 8, 2012, 3:08:18 PM PDT
Cottage cheese - - How I miss this! Does anyone know of a dairy, soy and gluten free cottage cheee?

Posted on Jul 8, 2012, 3:52:20 PM PDT
I have an Old Cooknook Challenge: Does anyone know what "fairy toast" is? I've seen it mentione in a couple of cookbooks from the early1900s, but no description of how to prepare it, just "serve with fairy toast." Was it perhaps a packaged product?

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 8, 2012, 4:03:33 PM PDT
Grandma says:
@Leigh - I do "know" what it is and even have the recipe somewhere i think, but I've just come in and my brain is fried. I'm trying desperately not to fall asleep on the keyboard because I need to bake meringues for tomorrow's blog and write a cheat sheet. It was not a packaged product . . .

Posted on Jul 8, 2012, 4:05:28 PM PDT
Grandma says:
You might see if this sounds like it would fit - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fairy_bread

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 8, 2012, 4:56:53 PM PDT
Fairy Toast:
I found two versions:

http://www.flickr.com/photos/littlerosyrunabout/3529322356/
&
Recipes_Fairy Toast
http://www.epicurus.com/food/recipes/fairy-toast/7713

Then I googled "recipes, old fashioned Fairy Toast" and am looking for what this brings. Hope this is helpful. SOunds liek fun!

Posted on Jul 9, 2012, 6:06:05 AM PDT
Grandma says:
I found a pdf copy of an original Betty Crocker Cookbook for Boys and Girls - my first cookbook! The link is on my blog (URL on profile) in the latest post. I did check out the Kindle and epub versions and they are terribly distorted.

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 9, 2012, 11:44:51 AM PDT
S. Kessler says:
And I just downloaded a whole bunch of kindle cookbooks that Amazon has on sale today for $2.51 to $5.69. Several of the editions of Canal House Cooking were being offered for just a few dollars and the Silver Palate Good Times Cookbook, their entertaining volume from 1985, was offered on Kindle for $2.51! It's over 450 pages in print, and even if it isn't formatted all that well, for that price I could not turn it down.

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 9, 2012, 11:48:12 AM PDT
S. Kessler says:
A. Lyons: I also make a great pasta salad that keeps using all my favorite things that go into a Greek salad such as Kalamada olives, cucumbers, Feta Cheese, tomatoes, purple onion, and I pour a bit of Italian dressing over the noodles while warm and then when it cools down I add the rest of the items.

SK: I do this with the Italian wheat grain Farro. Cut the veggies in bite size pieces, tossed with farro that's been cooked in boiling water for about 25 minutes and then drained and rinsed in cold water, and dress with lemon juice, olive oil, salt, pepper, and fresh mint. Lovely and cooling. Farro is a wonderful grain that is great in salads, soups, and pilafs. And since it is nearly a whole grain (the outer hull is removed), very good for you.

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 9, 2012, 12:03:53 PM PDT
"I found a pdf copy of an original Betty Crocker Cookbook for Boys and Girls "

HI Grandma:
I went ot your site, but I could not find this. Can you make it more visible? Thanks

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 9, 2012, 12:19:15 PM PDT
Grandma says:
Hi jipsii M'Sina - it is in the very first post, titled Hot or Not, down near the bottom of the page. You'll see a picture of the cover of the book and the words "download as a free pdf" in the text near it are the link.

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 9, 2012, 12:21:09 PM PDT
Last edited by the author on Jul 9, 2012, 12:21:19 PM PDT
Thank you, Grandma! on my way there!

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 9, 2012, 12:23:11 PM PDT
Grandma says:
You're very welcome. There is at least one other free book on the blog, but it is not "old" - though actually there is a link in that same post that goes to every single cookbook that Dole Raisins has ever put out, 100 years worth!

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 9, 2012, 12:29:23 PM PDT
Found it! One has to skip the first Hot or Not and go to the one on the lower right in order to get to this page, but I did it!

YOu kow, I hjad this same book as a kid. And my mom had the red and white picture cookbook. I grew up learning from both. I also have copies of each in my library, but gave some to my granddaughter, who is 7 and 1/2 and loves to cook.

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 9, 2012, 12:32:00 PM PDT
Grandma;
Thank you and thank you all so much - - you bring such delight to my life!

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 9, 2012, 12:33:32 PM PDT
Grandma says:
Actually, you should see a little link on the bottom left of any of those posts on the front page that says "read more" - just click there and you'll get the whole thing.

I have a granddaughter almost exactly that age - she'll be 8 in September. She's coming to visit the end of the month and I have a facsimile copy waiting for her. I think I have one of the red & white picture cookbooks too, though at the minute I still need to put together two more bookcases so I even can get all the books out of boxes, never mind organizing them in any way or having even the first clue where anything might be.

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 9, 2012, 12:44:51 PM PDT
I also need floor to ceiling bok cases in EVERY room of my place- - oh, what a dream!. I have yet to unpack several boxes of books yet. But, they are such wonderful company!

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 9, 2012, 12:55:22 PM PDT
I tried my hand at scrapple ths weekend (It is currently setting up in the refrig in two loaf pans), as well as a melon sorbet (watermelon, canteloupe, lemon slice, sugar, coconut creamer) - - still in the freezer and going nowhere, not even beginning to freeze a bit and I am too lazy to haul out the ice cream maker - - I am using the zip-lock bag method. Hoping it will be done for dinner.

Oh, food -- - too much or too little it seems.... I am still in the plane of eight kids and a family spread of thirty or more.

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 9, 2012, 1:05:31 PM PDT
Grandma says:
I hear you there! I think learning to cook for just me is the hardest thing I've had to learn to do. I cooked for an army for 50 years. Slowly, very slowly, I am learning how to make just 4 biscuits instead of a dozen or two. Made 9 cornbread sticks the other day instead of 3 dozen. It is slow going though. I send lots home with my youngest, have a freezer that is nearly overloaded, pass out a lot in the neighborhood and still manage to waste. I can't face the same thing meal after meal after meal though . . and I refuse to live on frozen crap.

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 9, 2012, 1:12:13 PM PDT
Grandma says:
I have a first edition set - uncut - of everything that Rudyard Kipling wrote put out by the Kipling Society in Scotland around 1902+ - still in storage

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 9, 2012, 1:15:37 PM PDT
Grandma says:
:) this is the page that has the free old cookbooks from Sunmaid - there are 27 or so I think, every one they have ever put out

http://fromgrandmaswindow.blogspot.com/2012/05/of-plums-chick-flicks-and-picnics.html#more
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Discussion in:  Cooking forum
Participants:  72
Total posts:  407
Initial post:  May 13, 2012
Latest post:  Sep 3, 2013

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