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34% Drop in Computer Science Degrees in CT


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Initial post: Nov 3, 2012, 4:08:59 PM PDT
"the number of Connecticut students graduating with a degree in computer science dropped 34 percent between 2002 and 2011."--Jeanette Horan, IBM's chief information officer.

Horan's op-ed piece was published in the Hartford Courant on 3 Nov. 2012, Page A9. If the above claim is accurate, it may indicate one end-result of the "standards" and "math reform" rubbish that was launched in 1989. It would have been quite informative if Horan had told readers about the extensive funding that IBM has been providing for the promotion of this rubbish.
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http://www.courant.com/news/opinion/hc-op-horan-connecticut-boost-science-technology-e-20121102,0,7010742.story

We Must Help Students Reach Technology's Cutting Edge

By JEANETTE HORAN | OTHER OPINION

The Hartford Courant

5:37 p.m. EDT, November 2, 2012

Connecticut has been home to mechanical and technological innovation for decades, but can it continue to remain competitive? Think about this: The world's first submarine, the portable typewriter, artificial heart, sewing machine, color television, and even the Frisbee were conceived and made right here in the Constitution State.

The world may have changed significantly since many of these inventions occurred, but there is no less of a need for innovation and exploring new ways to keep Connecticut competitive. Experts agree that people with backgrounds in science, technology, engineering and mathematics, known as STEM, are the key to our economic growth.

Just look at the numbers. In Connecticut, we will need to fill some 232,000 STEM-related jobs by 2018, according to the organization STEMconnector. This may not be easy considering that the number of Connecticut students graduating with a degree in computer science dropped 34 percent between 2002 and 2011.

Nationally, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reports that only 5 percent of U.S. workers today are employed in science and engineering fields, even as those jobs account for more than 50 percent of sustained economic expansion. China produces five times more graduates in science and engineering than the U.S., while Europe has three times as many. Four decades ago, about 40 percent of the world's scientists and engineers resided in the U.S, but now that number is just 15 percent.

What can be done?

A look at history suggests that the U.S. has never turned away from a challenge once its imagination is engaged. In the 1950s and 1960s, space exploration and landing the first manned spacecraft on the moon inspired the world and captivated students everywhere. This was technology at its best, pushing a new frontier around a common goal that was as important as it was historical. The 1970s and 1980s saw the birth and proliferation of personal computers as innovators began applying technology for productivity and entertainment purposes.

We need to renew this enthusiasm. The wired world is enabling unprecedented communication and collaboration, sensors are producing mind-boggling volumes of data that are being corralled and analyzed to improve people's lives and address the world's most perplexing problems. In order to fully realize the the goals of a Smarter Planet, a new generation of mathematicians, scientists, engineers and technicians must emerge. We can captivate young minds by assuring them that they can change the world. And they can.

For example, the world's fastest supercomputer installed at the U.S. Department of Energy's Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is destined to provide a 40-fold improvement in the prediction of earthquakes to help provide safe evacuation routes for citizens. Natural language technology, widely seen when IBM Watson competed on the "Jeopardy!" game show, is addressing societal challenges and taking on some of the most complex health care issues.

Technology is also being used to improve electricity and water management, solve traffic congestion, produce greener buildings and improve public safety, among countless other benefits.

New generations of supercomputers are on the horizon. Who will lead these advances and apply them to benefit society? Unfortunately, the growing shortage of IT skills leaves this question unanswered. But we can and must remedy this situation.

In Connecticut, we can start by replicating the model that has produced a strong recent increase in the number of engineering degrees earned - that is, initiating a meaningful focus on all STEM disciplines at the high school level. I live in Connecticut and nothing would please me more than seeing our state capture its full share of the economic benefits that flow from technology and innovation.

As a mathematics major in college, I stepped out into a world of growing opportunity just as the computer age was getting off the ground. Today, the opportunities are 100-fold greater. Yes, this is absolutely about jobs. But it holds even greater significance: To remain competitive globally and to improve the world through technology, we must adopt a serious and collective focus on building a strong pipeline of STEM innovators.

Jeanette Horan of Wilton is IBM's chief information officer.

Posted on Nov 3, 2012, 5:35:17 PM PDT
Dagny Tag says:
Students do not see it moral or ethical to work for companies that are too big to fail. We must break apart huge companies that pay the CEO millions. Innovation comes from start-ups today not from Big Blue. The huge companies just throw money around and think they can buy you. Not this next generation.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 3, 2012, 8:01:59 PM PDT
because they know the govt is importing h1bs as fast as they can to drive down the pay of CS grads

there are plenty of older workers who want those jobs
when corps will pay market rates
and give training in the latest software instead of just hiring new grads and dumping htem when the next new program comes out

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 4, 2012, 4:10:14 AM PST
Dagny Tag says:
"give training in the latest software instead of just hiring new grads and dumping htem when the next new program comes out "
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Not as long as people are having more children than there is a need for them. The growth in population means less for all.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 4, 2012, 6:42:12 AM PST
Computer science majors have a wide variety of job choices. They do not have to become corporate hacks for conglomerates. Last June, I spoke with the chairman of a computer science department. His college had seen a dropoff in majors, which he attributed, in part, to their poor high school mathematics education.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 4, 2012, 9:36:30 AM PST
Dagny Tag says:
"His college had seen a dropoff in majors, which he attributed, in part, to their poor high school mathematics education. "
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Look at the big picture. "No Child Left Behind" teaches to the test and makes math boring rather than inspiring. Programing is not all math and does not need good high school grades. It is the burst of the computer bubble that killed enthusiasm as the big money is in banking and Wall street. You can get an engineer from India to write code. The new generation is not interested in having just a job. They want to be entertained and get paid for it.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 4, 2012, 10:38:48 AM PST
there are way too many people

the luddites were ahead of their time
automation requires fewer people working
no way jobs keeps up with population growth

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 4, 2012, 12:12:24 PM PST
Dagny Tag says:
"there are way too many people'
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More like too few resources. If we had enough resources people could work for only one day a week. Robots could do most the work. But that is not going to happen when the population continues to grow. You are going to have fighting for the few resources.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 21, 2012, 12:27:44 PM PST
nutz

biz would own the robots
80% of people would be on UI
20% working 60 hours a week

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 21, 2012, 4:28:44 PM PST
Dagny Tag says:
"biz would own the robots"
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Biz owns nothing it is all owned by holding companies that control whole world wide sectors. There will be no money for unemployment. It will come down to revolution and massive deaths. The cut in world population and destruction of production will offer opportunities for who is left.
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Discussion in:  Education forum
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Initial post:  Nov 3, 2012
Latest post:  Nov 21, 2012

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