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Customer Discussions > History forum

What is up with all the DULL,BORING,MONOTONOUS, colored vehicles on the roads


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Showing 1-25 of 26 posts in this discussion
Initial post: Feb 16, 2013, 4:36:03 AM PST
C. Hall says:
Nothing but white,black,midnight blue,army green,dull burgundy reds,and every shade of gray,silver and beige.

Man, I am sick of feeling like I've gone partially color-blind every trip on the highways!

I believe there is a population-control conspiracy afoot,that we are all being lulled into falling asleep at the wheel,LOL!

My car now is gray,but the next one is going to be bright mustard yellow,even if I have to force the dealer to take off the cost of a paint job from the price,and have it painted myself!

I absolutely refuse to put another 'snooze-inducing' vehicle on the road. Yawnnnnnnnnnnnnn!

In reply to an earlier post on Feb 16, 2013, 4:45:44 PM PST
[Deleted by Amazon on Jul 15, 2016, 3:42:47 PM PDT]

In reply to an earlier post on Feb 16, 2013, 4:53:12 PM PST
C. Hall says:
LOL,exactly!

Posted on Feb 17, 2013, 12:58:03 AM PST
Bubba says:
If they start outlawing certain colors of cars, they also need to outlaw neon color cars as they are distracting and red cars because people in red cars tend to speed. And what is up with that funny dusty rose/mauve sort of non-color that was introduced in the 80s? It seems that it was introduced just so that people couldn't say what color a car was.

Posted on Feb 17, 2013, 5:53:20 AM PST
Last edited by the author on Feb 17, 2013, 6:10:36 AM PST
C. Hall says:
I'm not saying they should 'outlaw' any of those dull-crappy non-colors, I'm just wondering why the heck we no longer see any bright pretty colors?

Go to a large mall[or even a big car dealersip] and gaze as far as you can see in the parking lot,and how many cars stand out? Just like on the highway/interstate....very,very few.

They are just so freakin UGLY and MONOTONOUS!

I'm a baby boomer so I was a teen when Muscle cars were king,and how I miss all those custom paint jobs with the flames ect,and car bodies with style,instead of everything looking alike and mind-numbingly dull.Songs were even written about our cool cars!

Posted on Feb 17, 2013, 6:18:58 AM PST
Last edited by the author on Feb 17, 2013, 6:27:16 AM PST
MC Zaptone says:
Hi folks I'm posting from England, there are very some different trends here, the small super minis like the Fiat 500 and Mini Coopers are hitting the roads with bright primary colours often with multi-coloured images, flags and designs in a retro back to the '60s look.

Check these out:

http://limitedfun.wordpress.com/2009/07/03/matt-moore-mini/

The muscle cars latest must have colour is a Matt Black skin applied over they car.
In fact the Matt look in various colours is catching on fast as are very old colours such as ivory and duck-egg blue.
One thing you rarely, if ever, see in Europe is Brown or Beige vehicles, it's considered the height of bad taste.

Posted on Feb 17, 2013, 6:56:42 AM PST
Last edited by the author on Feb 17, 2013, 6:57:40 AM PST
C. Hall says:
You're lucky no browns or beige,but black is out for me too,and so are cars as small as Smart cars,Fiats and Mini Coopers. I won't go smaller than a mid size sedan.

In reply to an earlier post on Feb 17, 2013, 7:57:54 AM PST
MC Zaptone says:
A sedan, that's what we call a saloon over here and a two door is a coupé.
Remember colours are not just for fashion, in the Middle and Far East most cars are either white or silver to reflect the heat.

Posted on Feb 17, 2013, 9:30:14 AM PST
S. Kessler says:
And this is in the history forum why?

In reply to an earlier post on Feb 17, 2013, 10:14:09 AM PST
Bubba says:
I drove a 1969 375-hp Chevelle SS396, it ran like a scalded ape and would be considred to be very much a muscle car -- and it was solid gray, it didn't even have any stripes on it. Chevrolet said that it was gunmetal gray.

I learned to drive in a 1963 Chevrolet Biscayne with a 327ci 340 hp engine with electronic ignition, and some other HP goodies; it wasn't considered at the time to be a muscle car (the term hadn't yet been coined). The Biscayne was the lightest of the full size Chevy's and made for a good power to weight ratio. Many car people would now classify my Biscayne as a classic muscle car -- and it was a nice plain maroon color.

In reply to an earlier post on Feb 17, 2013, 10:17:01 AM PST
Bubba says:
I also think that Brown or Beige vehicles are the height of bad taste.

In reply to an earlier post on Feb 18, 2013, 5:50:34 AM PST
Last edited by the author on Feb 19, 2013, 12:35:45 AM PST
C. Hall says:
S. Kessler says:
[quote]And this is in the history forum why?[/quote]

And where else would you put a thread about how America's auto industry has drastically changed,hmmm?
The disappearance of every bright color paint on American made vehicles is a fairly recent trend,and it's just freakin weird,and I'm not the only one who has noticed this.

In reply to an earlier post on Feb 18, 2013, 6:27:45 AM PST
S. Kessler says:
Is that what this is? Sounded like someone complaining about car colors to me.

In reply to an earlier post on Feb 18, 2013, 8:15:59 AM PST
anne says:
That would be history repeating itself. Last time it was because there was only one color offered.

Posted on Feb 18, 2013, 10:18:11 AM PST
Personally, I think we can trace the decline of the automobile industry to when Ford stopped production of the Model T.

In reply to an earlier post on Feb 22, 2013, 1:26:10 AM PST
Bubba says:
Chevrolet offered their cars in competition with the Ford Model T in many colors, but not in black. The earliest Model T's were green; Ford went to black for the Model T because it was the color that dried the fastest during production.

In reply to an earlier post on Feb 22, 2013, 10:59:33 AM PST
Lientje says:
Christine: I love my car, but it is a silver one and I cannot tell you how many times I have
tried to open the wrong door because every other car in the parking lot is the same color.

In reply to an earlier post on Feb 22, 2013, 11:09:20 AM PST
Last edited by the author on Feb 22, 2013, 11:09:42 AM PST
Just to clarify: (from Wikipedia)
However, in the first years of production from 1908 to 1914, the Model T was not available in black[20] but rather only grey, green, blue, and red. Green was available for the touring cars, town cars, coupes, and Landaulets. Grey was only available for the town cars, and red only for the touring cars. By 1912, all cars were being painted midnight blue with black fenders. It was only in 1914 that the "any color so long as it is black" policy was finally implemented. It is often stated that Ford suggested the use of black from 1914 to 1926 due to the cheap cost and durability of black paint.

In reply to an earlier post on Feb 22, 2013, 11:12:57 AM PST
Ford also spec'd the dimensions of wooden crates that were used to ship parts (transmissions, axles??) from other factories to the assembly plants so that he could use the wood to build the frames for the old boxy bodies of the cars in the early years.

Posted on Feb 22, 2013, 12:45:44 PM PST
Art Franklin says:
I think the answer is fear. We all know that there are a lot of bored traffic cops trying to make a quota out there. If your car is red, hot pink, has custom logos, etc, you may attract that bored cop's attention. He may notice your slight swerve and perceive it differently than that conservative commuter or soccer mom vehicle, just because psychologically he will picture somebody different at the wheel.

OK, say you have a unique car, and you have a slightly higher percentage of getting stopped. Your troubles don't stop there. Now the local cops know your car, and if your run-ins have gone sour in the past you're an easy mark for persecution.

I remember renting a black HHR one week while my normal car was in the shop. I don't know what it was but I got pulled over twice in 4 days. Normally I get pulled over an average of once every 3-5 years or so. Imagine if I had a colorful sports car with a flashy graphic!

In reply to an earlier post on Feb 22, 2013, 12:52:55 PM PST
Recycling before it was popular.

In reply to an earlier post on Feb 22, 2013, 1:38:43 PM PST
Last edited by the author on Feb 22, 2013, 1:40:54 PM PST
Christine

"And where else would you put a thread about how America's auto industry has drastically changed,hmmm?
The disappearance of every bright color paint"

How about here: https://www.amazon.com/forum/cars

Tschüß!

In reply to an earlier post on Feb 23, 2013, 9:09:02 AM PST
Last edited by the author on Feb 23, 2013, 9:10:07 AM PST
Bubba says:
Ford also popularized the use of charcoal, he built a plant for making charcoal from wood scraps produced during car manufacture. The location for the first Ford Charcoal plant was found by a guy named Kingsford. The brandname of Ford Charcoal was later changed to Kingsford Charcoal.

In reply to an earlier post on Feb 23, 2013, 9:24:11 AM PST
JagdTiger says:
A lot of outside barbecues used Kingsford.

In reply to an earlier post on Feb 23, 2013, 4:42:14 PM PST
Last edited by the author on Feb 23, 2013, 4:43:26 PM PST
Bubba says:
They still do, although a lot are now using LP gas. Kroger had a mountain of Kingsford charcoal outside their door last summer.
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Discussion in:  History forum
Participants:  14
Total posts:  26
Initial post:  Feb 16, 2013
Latest post:  Feb 23, 2013

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