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Jews vs. Goyim?

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In reply to an earlier post on Aug 29, 2012 9:43:05 PM PDT
Allan says:
Just once, John M., give us your considered opinion on Lawrence's posts and his sources.

Let's see you be fair dinkum.

Posted on Aug 29, 2012 10:56:12 PM PDT
Allan says:
Those who need to see me as either an antiSemite or a ''hater'' of Israel, might like to look at this and see if it helps them understand why I take the political POV I express so often on these threads.

''God will be giving the Jews ten times what they have today. The actual borders start near the Nile River in Egypt extending north to the Euphrates River, taking in half of Egypt, all of Israel, Lebanon, Syria and Jordan.
The borders go south along the Euphrates to the Persian Gulf, which will take in half of Iraq and three quarters of Saudi Arabia. ''

This garbage is absolutely criminal.

And if anyone hasn't yet worked out why, Jimmy DeYoung tells us quite clearly:

"The late President Assad of Syria said that the problem in the Middle East is the Jews believe that God has given them all of this land. ''

Posted on Aug 30, 2012 8:34:48 AM PDT
Lientje says:
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In reply to an earlier post on Aug 30, 2012 10:39:59 AM PDT
William B says:
It's good to see that you're such an avid fan of Prophecy Today and the Jimmy DeYoung Ministries.

In reply to an earlier post on Aug 30, 2012 5:44:50 PM PDT
Allan says:
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Posted on Aug 30, 2012 6:30:51 PM PDT
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Posted on Aug 30, 2012 6:35:18 PM PDT
part 1:

Judith Butler responds to attack: `I affirm a Judaism that is not associated with state violence'
by Judith Butler on August 27, 2012 139
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Yesterday the Jerusalem Post published an attack on the awarding of a major international prize to Judith Butler, the philosopher and Berkeley professor of comparative literature, because Butler favors boycotting Israel. Butler wrote this response and, unhopeful that the Post would publish it, sent it to us. --Editors.

The Jerusalem Post recently published an article reporting that some organizations are opposed to my receiving the Adorno Prize, an award given every three years to someone who works in the tradition of critical theory broadly construed. The accusations against me are that I support Hamas and Hezbollah (which is not true) that I support BDS (partially true), and that I am anti-Semitic (patently false). Perhaps I should not be as surprised as I am that those who oppose my receiving the Adorno Prize would seek recourse to such scurrilous and unfounded charges to make their point. I am a scholar who gained an introduction to philosophy through Jewish thought, and I understand myself as defending and continuing a Jewish ethical tradition that includes figures such as Martin Buber and Hannah Arendt. I received a Jewish education in Cleveland, Ohio at The Temple under the tutelage of Rabbi Daniel Silver where I developed strong ethical views on the basis of Jewish philosophical thought. I learned, and came to accept, that we are called upon by others, and by ourselves, to respond to suffering and to call for its alleviation. But to do this, we have to hear the call, find the resources by which to respond, and sometimes suffer the consequences for speaking out as we do. I was taught at every step in my Jewish education that it is not acceptable to stay silent in the face of injustice. Such an injunction is a difficult one, since it does not tell us exactly when and how to speak, or how to speak in a way that does not produce a new injustice, or how to speak in a way that will be heard and registered in the right way. My actual position is not heard by these detractors, and perhaps that should not surprise me, since their tactic is to destroy the conditions of audibility.

I studied philosophy at Yale University and continued to consider the questions of Jewish ethics throughout my education. I remain grateful for those ethical resources, for the formation that I had, and that animates me still. It is untrue, absurd, and painful for anyone to argue that those who formulate a criticism of the State of Israel is anti-Semitic or, if Jewish, self-hating. Such charges seek to demonize the person who is articulating a critical point of view and so disqualify the viewpoint in advance. It is a silencing tactic: this person is unspeakable, and whatever they speak is to be dismissed in advance or twisted in such a way that it negates the validity of the act of speech. The charge refuses to consider the view, debate its validity, consider its forms of evidence, and derive a sound conclusion on the basis of listening to reason. The charge is not only an attack on persons who hold views that some find objectionable, but it is an attack on reasonable exchange, on the very possibility of listening and speaking in a context where one might actually consider what another has to say. When one set of Jews labels another set of Jews "anti-Semitic", they are trying to monopolize the right to speak in the name of the Jews. So the allegation of anti-Semitism is actually a cover for an intra-Jewish quarrel.

In the United States, I have been alarmed by the number of Jews who, dismayed by Israeli politics, including the occupation, the practices of indefinite detention, the bombing of civilian populations in Gaza, seek to disavow their Jewishness. They make the mistake of thinking that the State of Israel represents Jewishness for our times, and that if one identifies as a Jew, one supports Israel and its actions. And yet, there have always been Jewish traditions that oppose state violence, that affirm multi-cultural co-habitation, and defend principles of equality, and this vital ethical tradition is forgotten or sidelined when any of us accept Israel as the basis of Jewish identification or values. So, on the one hand, Jews who are critical of Israel think perhaps they cannot be Jewish anymore of Israel represents Jewishness; and on the other hand, those who seek to vanquish anyone who criticizes Israel equate Jewishness with Israel as well, leading to the conclusion that the critic must be anti-Semitic or, if Jewish, self-hating. My scholarly and public efforts have been directed toward getting out of this bind. In my view, there are strong Jewish traditions, even early Zionist traditions, that value co-habitation and that offer ways to oppose violence of all kinds, including state violence. It is most important that these traditions be valued and animated for our time - they represent diasporic values, struggles for social justice, and the exceedingly important Jewish value of "repairing the world" (Tikkun).

http://mondoweiss.net/2012/08/judith-butler-responds-to-attack-i-affirm-a-judaism-that-is-not-associated-with-state-violence.html

Posted on Aug 30, 2012 6:36:54 PM PDT
Part 2:

Judith Butler responds to attack: `I affirm a Judaism that is not associated with state violence'

It is clear to me that the passions that run so high on these issues are those that make speaking and hearing very difficult. A few words are taken out of context, their meaning distorted, and they then come to label or, indeed, brand an individual. This happens to many people when they offer a critical view of Israel - they are branded as anti-Semites or even as Nazi collaborators; these forms of accusation are meant to establish the most enduring and toxic forms of stigmatization and demonization. They target the person by taking the words out of context, inverting their meanings and having them stand for the person; indeed, they nullify the views of that person without regard to the content of those views. For those of us who are descendants of European Jews who were destroyed in the Nazi genocide (my grandmother's family was destroyed in a small village south of Budapest), it is the most painful insult and injury to be called complicitous with the hatred of Jews or to be called self-hating. And it is all the more difficult to endure the pain of such an allegation when one seeks to affirm what is most valuable in Judaism for thinking about contemporary ethics, including the ethical relation to those who are dispossessed of land and rights of self-determination, to those who seek to keep the memory of their oppression alive, to those who seek to live a life that will be, and must be, worthy of being grieved. I contend that these values all derive from important Jewish sources, which is not to say that they are only derived from those sources. But for me, given the history from which I emerge, it is most important as a Jew to speak out against injustice and to struggle against all forms of racism. This does not make me into a self-hating Jew. It makes me into someone who wishes to affirm a Judaism that is not identified with state violence, and that is identified with a broad-based struggle for social justice.

My remarks on Hamas and Hezbollah have been taken out of context and badly distort my established and continuing views. I have always been in favor of non-violent political action, and this principle has consistently characterized my views. I was asked by a member of an academic audience a few years ago whether I thought Hamas and Hezbollah belonged to "the global left" and I replied with two points. My first point was merely descriptive: those political organizations define themselves as anti-imperialist, and anti-imperialism is one characteristic of the global left, so on that basis one could describe them as part of the global left. My second point was then critical: as with any group on the left, one has to decide whether one is for that group or against that group, and one needs to critically evaluate their stand. I do not accept or endorse all groups on the global left. Indeed, these very remarks followed a talk that I gave that evening which emphasized the importance of public mourning and the political practices of non-violence, a principle that I elaborate and defend in three of my recent books: Precarious Life, Frames of War, and Parting Ways. I have been interviewed on my non-violent views by Guernica and other on-line journals, and those views are easy to find, if one wanted to know where I stand on such issues. I am in fact sometimes mocked by members of the left who support forms of violent resistance who think I fail to understand those practices. It is true: I do not endorse practices of violent resistance and neither do I endorse state violence, cannot, and never have. This view makes me perhaps more naïve than dangerous, but it is my view. So it has always seemed absurd to me that my comments were taken to mean that I support or endorse Hamas and Hezbollah! I have never taken a stand on either organization, just as I have never supported every organization that is arguably part of the global left - I am not unconditionally supportive of all groups that currently constitute the global left. To say that those organizations belong to the left is not to say that they should belong, or that I endorse or support them in any way.

Two further points. I do support the Boycott, Divestment, and Sanctions movement in a very specific way. I reject some versions and accept others. For me, BDS means that I oppose investments in companies that make military equipment whose sole purpose is to demolish homes. It means as well that I do not speak at Israeli institutions unless they take a strong stand against the occupation. I do not accept any version of BDS that discriminates against individuals on the basis of their national citizenship, and I maintain strong collaborative relationships with many Israeli scholars. One reason I can endorse BDS and not endorse Hamas and Hezbollah is that BDS is the largest non-violent civic political movement seeking to establish equality and the rights of self-determination for Palestinians. My own view is that the peoples of those lands, Jewish and Palestinian, must find a way to live together on the condition of equality. Like so many others, I long for a truly democratic polity on those lands and I affirm the principles of self-determination and co-habitation for both peoples, indeed, for all peoples. And my wish, as is the wish of an increasing number of Jews and non-Jews, is that the occupation come to an end, that violence of all kinds cease, and that the substantial political rights of all people in that land be secured through a new political structure.

Two last notes: The group that is sponsoring this call is the Scholars for Peace in the Middle East, a misnomer at best, that claims on its website that "Islam" is an "inherently anti-semetic (sic) religion." It is not, as The Jerusalem Post has reported, a large group of Jewish scholars in Germany, but an international organization with a base in Australia and California. They are a right-wing organization and so part of an intra-Jewish war. Ex-board member Gerald Steinberg is known for attacking human rights organizations in Israel as well as Amnesty International and Human Rights Watch. Their willingness to include Israeli infractions of human rights apparently makes them also eligible for the label, "anti-Semitic."

Finally, I am not an instrument of any "NGO": I am on the advisory board of Jewish Voice for Peace, a member of Kehillah Synagogue in Oakland, California, and an executive member of Faculty for Israeli-Palestinian Peace in the US and The Jenin Theatre in Palestine. My political views have ranged over a large number of topics, and have not been restricted to the Middle East or the State of Israel. Indeed, I have written about violence and injustice in other parts of the world, focusing mainly in wars waged by the United States. I have also written on violence against transgendered people in Turkey, psychiatric violence, torture in Guantanamo, and about police violence against peaceful protestors in the U.S, to name a few. I have also written against anti-Semitism in Germany and against racial discrimination in the United States.

About Judith Butler
Judith Butler is Maxine Elliot Professor in the Departments of Rhetoric and Comparative Literature and the Co-director of the Program of Critical Theory at the University of California, Berkeley. She also is Hannah Arendt Professor of Philosophy at the European Graduate School in Saas-Fee, Switzerland. She has written many books, including most recently The Power of Religion in Public Life.

http://mondoweiss.net/2012/08/judith-butler-responds-to-attack-i-affirm-a-judaism-that-is-not-associated-with-state-violence.html

Posted on Aug 30, 2012 6:41:42 PM PDT
Last edited by the author on Aug 30, 2012 6:44:33 PM PDT
Jimmy Carter on Corrie verdict: `The court's decision confirms a climate of impunity, which facilitates Israeli human rights violations against Palestinian civilians in the Occupied Territory.'
Posted on August 29, 2012 by Adam Horowitz
"The killing of an American peace activist is unacceptable," said former U.S. President Jimmy Carter. "The court's decision confirms a climate of impunity, which facilitates Israeli human rights violations against Palestinian civilians in the Occupied Territory."

Cindy Corrie following the verdict: `I don't think that Rachel should have moved. I think we should all have been standing there with her.'
Posted on August 28, 2012 by Leehee Rothschild

Leehee Rothschild reports from the Corrie family press conference held in Haifa following the verdict they had lost their wrongful death lawsuit against that state of Israel.

Corrie verdict demonstrates Israel cannot administer justice according to int'l standards - ISM
Posted on August 28, 2012 by International Solidarity Movement
Rachel Corrie was a member of the International Solidarity Movement when she was killed in Gaza in 2003. The ISM released this statement on the not guilty verdict in a civil suit brought against Israel by her parents. -

`We seek justice for the Corrie Family'
Posted on August 28, 2012 by Philip Weiss

This picture is from a Justice for Rachel Corrie action outside the Israeli Consulate in LA yesterday, sponsored by Jewish Voice for Peace. More pictures here. Oh, and here is a statement on today's verdict from Independent Jewish Voices (thanks ...

Blaming Rachel Corrie
Posted on August 28, 2012 by Sami Sulaiman
Oppressive and violent systems have different ideologies, different victims, different beneficiaries, and different experiences. But there are skeletal frameworks and forms that are present in them all. Whether expressed through media, or, as in the case of Rachel Corrie, through legal opinion, the intention of this rhetoric is always the same. It is to create both a literal and metaphorical landscape of ethical suspension.

US gov't has failed its promise to get answers from Israel about Rachel Corrie killing, her mother says
Posted on August 29, 2012 by Philip Weiss

The family of Rachel Corrie, who was killed by the Israelis nine years ago at age 23, has been shocked by the failure of the US government to get answers from its close ally about the killing, Rachel Corrie's mother said today. "Yes we have had support from the US government," Cindy Corrie said. "Has enough been done at this point? I don't think so."

State Department affirms Israel's impunity- abandoning ambassador who said Israeli investigation of Corrie killing was unsatisfactory
Posted on August 29, 2012 by Philip Weiss
Victoria Nuland says Dan Shapiro's statement to Corrie family about unsatisfactory Israeli investigation was "private" "support" - as if it was a kind of grief therapy

Exile and the Prophetic: Rachel Corrie, righteous gentile
Posted on August 29, 2012 by Marc H. Ellis
This post is part of Marc H. Ellis's "Exile and the Prophetic" feature for Mondoweiss. To read the entire series visit the archive page. Now Hurricane Isaac and, unbelievably so, it is heading straight for Katrina(ed) New Orleans.

read the entire set of articles at:
http://mondoweiss.net/israel-palestine

In reply to an earlier post on Aug 30, 2012 6:43:23 PM PDT
Allan says:
'' The accusations against me are that I support Hamas and Hezbollah (which is not true) that I support BDS (partially true), and that I am anti-Semitic (patently false). ''

Standard tactic, it seems.

''This happens to many people when they offer a critical view of Israel - they are branded as anti-Semites or even as Nazi collaborators; these forms of accusation are meant to establish the most enduring and toxic forms of stigmatization and demonization.''

Yup.

''In my view, there are strong Jewish traditions, even early Zionist traditions, that value co-habitation and that offer ways to oppose violence of all kinds, including state violence. It is most important that these traditions be valued and animated for our time - they represent diasporic values, struggles for social justice, and the exceedingly important Jewish value of "repairing the world" (Tikkun).''

Anathema.

Posted on Aug 30, 2012 6:46:42 PM PDT
Last edited by the author on Aug 30, 2012 7:07:12 PM PDT
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In reply to an earlier post on Aug 30, 2012 6:47:35 PM PDT
Allan says:
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Posted on Aug 30, 2012 7:01:36 PM PDT
Infographic: Palestinian homes demolished
Report by an Israeli non-governmental organisation says 2011 was a record year for Palestinian displacement.

ICAHD said 2011 was the record year of displacement , with the destruction of some 622 Palestinian structures by Israeli authorities, of which 222 were family homes. This resulted in 1,094 people being displaced - almost double the number for 2010.In additiion Israel destroyed 22 Palestinian homes in East Jerusalem leaving 88 Arabs homeless.

From Dec.,2008 to Jan.,2009,4455 Palestinian ho,mes were destroyed leaving over 20,000 Arabs homeless.

Since 1967 over 25,000 Pallestinian homes have beed leveled leaving over 160,00 Arabs without a home.

http://www.aljazeera.com/indepth/interactive/2012/08/2012830754014332.html
http://www.icahd.org/sites/default/files/The%20Judaization%20of%20Palestine%20(2)_1.pdf

Posted on Aug 30, 2012 7:04:40 PM PDT
On the receiving end of Israeli 'impunity'

Looking back at other victims who, like Rachel Corrie, came under Israeli attack and then were deprived of justice.

The death of 23-year-old American peace activist Rachel Corrie was a "regrettable accident", an Israeli court has ruled, in a verdict that was neither surprising nor unfamiliar.

Corrie was crushed by an Israeli Defense Force (IDF) bulldozer razing Palestinian homes on March 16, 2003. She was among a group of international peace activists volunteering in the Gaza Strip to protect Palestinian houses from demolition.

The student from Washington State was standing in front of a home in the Rafah refugee camp when the armoured bulldozer ploughed through it.

Wearing a bright orange jacket with reflective stripes, eyewitnesses said Corrie was completely visible to the driver, who failed to stop and ran over her twice. The Israeli army said the driver's vision was restricted.

The Haifa District Court on Tuesday rejected a civil lawsuit filed by her family against the Israeli army in 2005, which accused the IDF of intentionally killing Corrie.

Judge Oded Gershon said Corrie chose to put herself in danger. "She could have easily distanced herself from the danger like any reasonable person would," he said.

Hussein Abu Hussein, the lawyer for the Corrie family, said they might appeal the verdict with the Israeli Supreme Court. "We are now studying our options," said Hussein.

The ruling did not come as a shock. Similar lawsuits in the past against the army were also rejected by Israeli courts. A pattern also emerges of internal army investigations clearing soldiers involved, and pay-offs to victims' families to make the case go away.

Here is a list of Western civilians killed or wounded by the Israeli military:

James Miller

James Miller seen here on the right [AFP/Getty]
In May 2003, 34-year-old James Miller, a Welsh filmmaker and cameraman, was shot dead by the Israeli army in Rafah. Miller was working on a documentary called "Death in Gaza", which was released after his death in 2004.

An army spokesperson said Miller was caught in a cross-fire, and accused him of endangering his own life by "knowingly entering a combat zone". An investigation was opened by the Israeli army, but closed in September 2005. Miller's sister insisted her brother was deliberately killed.

Prosecutor Avichai Mandelblith admitted the army unit's commanding officer at the scene fired his weapon in breach of the IDF's rules of engagement. Nonetheless, no soldiers involved in the incident were put on trial.

Miller's family requested the prosecution of the Israeli soldiers in the United Kingdom under the Geneva Conventions Act. The Israeli government paid the family 1.75m pounds ($2.7m) in exchange for halting legal proceedings.

Tom Hurndall

Tom Hurndall shortly before being shot in the head [AP]
Twenty-one-year-old Tom Hurndall, a British photography student and peace activist, was shot in the head in the Gaza Strip on April 11, 2003. Hurndall remained in a coma before dying in January 2004 at a UK hospital.

Hurndall was in Rafah with a group of activists when the Israeli Defence Force suddenly opened fire. Recognising rounds were hitting the ground near a group of children, Hurndall attempted to move them to a safer location. A sniper's bullet struck his skull as he knelt down to carry a child away.

The Israeli army also claimed he was caught in a cross-fire, and blamed him for his own death by saying Hurndall was "functioning as human shield".

In October 2003, the British government pressured the IDF to open an investigation. The soldier who killed Hurndall - an award-winning marksman - said he aimed away from the activist and fired as a deterrent, but unintentionally hit him.

The soldier was sentenced by a military court to eleven-and-a-half years' imprisonment for manslaughter in August 2005. His sentence was, however, shortened to six-and-a-half years for "good behaviour". The International Solidarity Movement said "an injustice was committed by his early release from prison in September 2010".

Iain Hook

Iain Hook's UN identity card
Iain Hook, a 54-year-old British United Nations Relief and Works Agency employee, was shot dead by an Israeli sniper in Jenin on November 22, 2002. Hook was in a UN compound at the Jenin refugee camp when he was shot in the back from a distance of 20 metres. The Israeli army said the soldier mistook the mobile phone Hook was carrying for a grenade.

The British government pressured the Israeli government to launch an inquiry, and shortly after an Israeli general delivered a verbal report that didn't admit any wrongdoing to the British ambassador in Tel Aviv. The ambassador rejected the account, and insisted on a detailed written report.

In 2005, a British inquest was opened and jurors unanimously agreed Hook was deliberately killed. The British government in 2007 revealed the Israeli government had reached a secret settlement with Hook's family. No legal proceedings ever followed.

Brian Avery

Brian Avery returned to Israel to file charges [The Electronic Intifada]
American peace activist Brian Avery suffered permanent disfigurement after being shot in the face by an Israeli soldier in Jenin on April 5, 2003.

Avery was walking two blocks from his apartment with a group of international activists when two Israeli military vehicles approached. Avery was wearing a fluorescent vest with "Doctor" written on it. Soldiers "opened fire with their machine guns and continued shooting for a very long time", Avery said. A round from a heavy weapon tore through his face.

The Israeli army refused to open an inquiry into the incident, claiming no soldiers on patrol were in the area that night.

In 2005, Avery requested a criminal investigation into the shooting. He accepted a settlement of $150,000 from the Israeli government in exchange for dropping the lawsuit in November 2008.

Tristan Anderson

Tristan Anderson before his injury [International Solidarity Movement]
Tristan Anderson, a 37-year-old American peace activist, was hit by a high-velocity tear gas canister during a demonstration in Nilin in 2009.

Fired by an Israeli soldier, the canister slammed into his head, fracturing his skull.

Anderson underwent extensive surgeries during a 15-month stay in an Israeli hospital.

In February 2010, the Israeli Ministry of Justice announced it would not file any cases in court.

Anderson and his family have filed a lawsuit against the Israeli army, but the case has yet to go to court.

Harald Fischer

A file photo of Harald Fischer
On November 15, 2000, 68-year-old German doctor Harald Fischer was killed by a missile fired from an Israeli helicopter gunship in Beit Jala.

Fischer was married to a Palestinian and worked as a volunteer doctor, living in Beit Jala since 1981.

He headed outside to help his wounded neighbour, whose house was hit in the same Israeli assault minutes earlier. ''He didn't come back,'' his wife said.

German Foreign Minister Joschka Fischer said he was "shocked and horrified" by the attack.

The Israeli government promised an investigation. No results have ever been announced.

Raffaele Ciriello

A self-portrait by Raffaele Ciriello
The 42-year-old Italian photographer was struck by a burst of machine gun fire from an Israeli tank.Raffaele Ciriello was shot dead on March 13, 2002 in Ramallah.

The Italian government demanded an investigation into the incident.

In August 2002, the Israeli army claimed there was "no evidence and no knowledge of a force that fired in the direction of the photographer". Case closed

http://www.aljazeera.com/indepth/features/2012/08/2012829112558460810.html

Posted on Aug 30, 2012 7:21:23 PM PDT
In my opinion the Jewish voice of power has to shout down the external and internal voices lest they make enough noise that the world takes notice and recognizes the world's biggest con job in history and that is the development and implementation of the Jewish state under the guise of the Holocaust.They know that their plans are unraveling thus the rise in the noise level to ,by force,instill fear in peoples hearts and brains over any criticism of Israel and her government.

When this plan was first implemented in the late 1800s there was no idea of an information highway as efficient and expansive as the internet.What could be hidden for years if not forever is now exposed in hours and days.That there are people like Gunther and Butler who will speak out in a voice that demands that people listen.The time is over for being afraid of being politically incorrect on the Israeli and Jewish issues.The old saying that in order to have a good neighbor,one has to be a good neighbor is certainly true in Israel's case.

In reply to an earlier post on Aug 30, 2012 8:11:16 PM PDT
William B says:
I never heard of the fellow before you dredged him up; but, at least DeYoung's "visions" aren't the alcohol induced Jew-bashing of your demented ilk.

In reply to an earlier post on Aug 30, 2012 8:17:25 PM PDT
Allan says:
William B says: I never heard of the fellow before you dredged him up; but, at least DeYoung's "visions" aren't the alcohol induced Jew-bashing of your demented ilk.

Allan: What was that cult again?

Posted on Aug 30, 2012 11:12:22 PM PDT
Allan says:
1 of 5 people think this post adds to the discussion.
Allan says: Just once, John M., give us your considered opinion on Lawrence's posts and his sources.
Let's see you be fair dinkum.

Interesting thought, John M.

What have these four ''mates'' of yours to fear if you were honest?

In reply to an earlier post on Aug 31, 2012 8:45:20 AM PDT
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In reply to an earlier post on Aug 31, 2012 8:49:05 AM PDT
\\Allan: That how your type keeps in touch with the ''real'' world you have bought into, isn't it? \\

Allen, Abusive Teacher B tries to mask his Dominionist beliefs. Thanks for helping expose his true anti-Christ nature.

In reply to an earlier post on Aug 31, 2012 8:52:25 AM PDT
\\I never heard of the fellow before you dredged him up; but, at least DeYoung's "visions" aren't the alcohol induced Jew-bashing of your demented ilk. \\

Criticizing the government of Israel is Jew-bashing?! What nonsense.

In reply to an earlier post on Aug 31, 2012 8:59:56 AM PDT
John M. Lane says:
I run from SPAM, Bookish. It's already buried you.

In reply to an earlier post on Aug 31, 2012 9:01:55 AM PDT
John M. Lane says:
Keep you dinkum to yourself, Allan.

Is it your day to be Dickerson's minder?

Posted on Aug 31, 2012 11:01:25 AM PDT
Last edited by the author on Aug 31, 2012 11:02:16 AM PDT
Ken Stern and the American Jewish Committee's Integrity Problem, by Rebecca Vilkomerson

By Rebecca Vilkomerson, Executive Director of Jewish Voice for Peace

Ken Stern, a specialist on anti-Semitism and extremism for the American Jewish Committee (AJC) authored an op-ed piece in the JTA a couple of weeks back entitled BDS Campaign may be Failing but its Effort to Delegitimize Israel Remains Dangerous that was filled with cherry-picked facts, twisted half-truths, and half-told tales.

My own attention was drawn to the article because Stern refers, as evidence of the moral corruption of the Boycott, Divestment and Sanctions movement, to the fact that the American Free Press (AFP), a despicable anti-Semitic and racist website, ran an interview with me earlier this month. The logic seemed to be that my consent to be interviewed, and the rather standard appreciation I expressed to the interviewer, was proof that the BDS movement is anti-Semitic at its core.

At first I gave Mr. Stern the benefit of the doubt-he couldn't have known that the interviewer had approached me under false pretenses, that I was horrified and sickened to be featured without my consent on the AFP website, and that I had already been trying for days to get the interview removed, to no avail. But when I approached him with these facts, backed up by documentation, he told me, and later the JTA editors, that he would not remove that section of the article.

To be clear: for Mr. Stern and the AJC, scoring political points is apparently more important than their integrity or the simple truth.

Given my intimate knowledge of Stern's approach to writing, a closer look at the column seemed worthwhile.

The first part of Stern's thesis is that the Boycott, Divestment, and Sanctions (BDS) movement is failing, and that the movement's only actual success in the U.S. is the Olympia Co-op Israeli products boycott.

This is odd, since just in the last few months, the Methodist and Presbyterian churches have endorsed the boycott of settlement products. The Friends Fiduciary Committee divested $900,000 from Caterpillar in the spring, and, as Stern notes, MSCI, the leading indexer of socially responsible companies, delisted Caterpillar, at least in part because of the way its equipment is used in the Occupied Territories .

His description of this decision as "meaningless" seems willfully inaccurate, given this decision marks the first time that a financial services company has recognized that a company's activities in Palestine are an element of how it is judged as a socially responsible investment company. Stern did not bother to add that as a result TIAA-CREF divested its Social Choice Funds of $72 million in Caterpillar stock, the largest divestment victory to date, one that TIAA-CREF CEO Roger Fergeson attributed at TIAA-CREF's shareholder meeting in July at least in part to the work of divestment activists including Jewish Voice for Peace.

Stern claims that the comparison to BDS efforts to end apartheid in South Africa are specious, yet on August 22nd it was announced that South Africa has decided to label products made beyond the Green Line as "made in the Occupied Palestinian Territories," the first step toward state sanctions of those products. As described in Ha'aretz, this decision is garnering a lot of attention in Israel, in recognition of the parallels with sanctions imposed on South Africa by Israel in 1987 at the end of the anti-apartheid struggle.

The African National Congress (ANC) in South Africa began calling for boycott, divestment and sanctions internationally in protest of the apartheid regimes from as early as 1959. While most people who remember BDS actions against South Africa are thinking of the 1980's, right before Apartheid fell, the reality is that this decisive moment in the anti-apartheid struggle came after decades of hard organizing, with victories coming slowly. It is a mistake for BDS opponents to think that because the pace of victories is not yet akin to the 1980's that the movement is failing. To the contrary, it seems to be progressing in the case of Palestine and Israel much faster than against South Africa.

The second part of Stern's thesis is that the BDS movement seeks the end of Israel. To look at just one example in his column, he attacks Kairos U.S.A, a Christian group that calls for solidarity with Palestinian non-violent campaigners, as well as Israelis and others who support them, for saying that Jews do not have "an exclusive or preeminent right to the Holy Land," but rather a right "to create a vibrant Jewish culture in historic Palestine."

Let's look at that statement more closely. It seems that unless the Jewish people are acknowledged as having the exclusive right to the land, then they are considered beyond the pale. But what about the 20% of the Israeli population that is not Jewish? What about the over 5 million indigenous Palestinians in Israel, the West Bank, Gaza and East Jerusalem combined? In Ken Stern's world, are you anti-Israel and anti-Semitic if you don't buy into a vision of an ethnocratic state where one people have more value and more rights than any other?

Last week, we saw the natural end result of this kind of thinking. A gang of teenagers in the center of Jerusalem attempted to lynch some young Palestinians. Hundreds, including a policeman, watched and did nothing. One of the suspects, after he was arrested, said as far as he was concerned, that the victim could die, because, "he is an Arab."

This is not the Israel that any of us can be proud of. The Israel that I was proud to be a part of when I lived there included the Israeli activists who put their very lives on the line to protest the policies being pursued in their names, who in the process created a glimpse of what the future of Israel and Palestine could look like if it were based on mutual support and cooperation, rather than fear and extremism.

Just as activists who support Palestinians who nonviolently fight against the Wall do not seek an end to Israel's existence, the movement to end Apartheid in South Africa did not seek an end to South Africa's existence. It sought freedom, dignity, and equality for all its citizens, regardless of race.

My own children hold Israeli citizenship. I would like them to have the option to live in an Israel that offers the same-freedom, dignity and equality, regardless of ethnicity or religion-the same values that I grew up with as an American. That is not about the end of Israel, but a vision for justice that all of us can be proud to say we've played a role in encouraging.

--Rebecca Vilkomerson, rebecca@jvp.org

http://www.muzzlewatch.com/

Posted on Aug 31, 2012 12:07:09 PM PDT
OPSEC/SEAL FINANCIER SHELDON ADELSON ASHAMED OF AMERICAN MILITARY SERVICE

yet he feels entitled to interfere with the US political scene and buy candidates.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ie7TsFOX-9M&feature=player_embedded#!
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