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Customer Discussions > Home Theater forum

Pure Direct


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Showing 1-11 of 11 posts in this discussion
Initial post: Apr 13, 2012, 3:25:04 PM PDT
mac says:
How are you using "Pure Direct" (or an equivalent) in your A/V system?

What do you think about the various decoders available?

Enquiring minds need to know.

Posted on Apr 14, 2012, 8:05:32 AM PDT
The "Direct" setting is just one option for music listening, not a de facto superior setting. The qualities of the recording and the playback equipment will determine whether it is the best option. Some recordings and equipment lack width and heighth in the soundstage. DSP's, and Dolby, and DTS decoders can improve the playback quality when compared to the "Direct" or standard settings.

Posted on Apr 14, 2012, 4:17:31 PM PDT
littekenji says:
i have used pure direct on my yamaha but prefer to keep the 2chan stereo setting for my music listening but i agree with prior post about the quality of the recording and playback equipment. try experimenting with your gear to achieve a better sound but i stay away from dsp's , thx, dts, and dolby when playing music--music sounds better the way it was intended to be listened upon not to add virtual channels to emphasize the music.

Posted on Apr 14, 2012, 4:21:52 PM PDT
littekenji says:
i have used pure direct on my yamaha but prefer to keep the 2chan stereo setting for my music listening but i agree with prior post about the quality of the recording and playback equipment. try experimenting with your gear to achieve a better sound but i stay away from dsp's , thx, dts, and dolby when playing music--music sounds better the way it was intended to be listened upon not to add virtual channels to emphasize the music.

In reply to an earlier post on Apr 15, 2012, 8:12:37 PM PDT
"Pure Direct" in a common receiver in my opinion is a gimmick. If you have a subwoofer, it should be better to use Stereo, which also turns on crossovers, and also Audyssey room correction, if you have it.

Posted on Apr 16, 2012, 6:11:15 AM PDT
mac says:
I use "pure direct" when listening to stereo music. Otherwise, an artificial soundstage will be created with the surround speakers. I also use "pure direct" when watching Blu-Ray video so that I hear what the director wants me to.

In reply to an earlier post on Apr 16, 2012, 5:17:13 PM PDT
That's not necessarily true though. Soundtracks are mixed for large speakers playing reference volume in well treated rooms. At home, not only do many of us not have speakers that play low enough, most of us do not have acoustic room treatments, and most of us do not play at reference volume.

This is where room correction in the receiver come in. It flattens out your frequency response. It makes sure your speakers are in phase. It makes sure low notes that are not reproduced by your bookshelves or monitors are sent to the bass.

Pure Direct defeats all the processing in the receiver. An artificial surround soundstage doesn't have to be created; there are modes which utilize only the front channels such as Stereo or Mono. Moreover, Stereo could usually be picked with subwoofer crossovers and Audyssey engaged.

In reply to an earlier post on Apr 16, 2012, 6:21:52 PM PDT
"Soundtracks are mixed for large speakers playing reference volume in well treated rooms."

Or in concert halls and stadiums, and live recordings in a wide variety of listening venues. Older jazz and classical recordings in mono format and lacking superior recording technology.

Sometimes these sonically bereft sources benefit from an increased soundstage offered by DSP's. Sometimes a very good recording benefits as well. Depends on the playback equipment, its layout, room characteristics, and personal taste.

In reply to an earlier post on Apr 16, 2012, 8:55:15 PM PDT
I didn't say anything about increasing soundstage with DSP's. I always leave those options off.

All recordings, modern or not, benefit from flat frequency response and proper subwoofer crossover and phase alignment. These things are taken for granted as far as director's intent is concerned. The functions are left out when you use Pure Direct.

But I guess you're right... Ultimately, personal taste is what matters...

Posted on Apr 17, 2012, 6:20:13 AM PDT
mac says:
Yes, Jonathan I understand what you are saying and you are probably giving better advice than I for most installations.
Although I use Tact RCS 2.0 room correction (in one of my systems), I tend to lean toward my roots (Naim NAC-12 and NAP-250 - having no tone controls) and only use speaker placement for equalization with my A/V system. I listen near-field (much to my wife's chagrin), so room interaction is minimized.

In reply to an earlier post on Apr 18, 2012, 1:25:17 AM PDT
That makes sense, thanks for clarifying.
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Discussion in:  Home Theater forum
Participants:  4
Total posts:  11
Initial post:  Apr 13, 2012
Latest post:  Apr 18, 2012

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