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Customer Discussions > Jazz forum

What Album Was Most Responsible For Turning You On to Jazz?


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Showing 1-25 of 520 posts in this discussion
Initial post: Sep 19, 2007 10:33:24 PM PDT
Last edited by the author on Sep 23, 2007 12:18:48 AM PDT
Mine was Kind Of Blue.

I came across it in a pile of records I had set aside from the Jazz section at the library in my home town of Kokomo, Indiana in 1974. I wanted to check out what jazz was about. The Jazz vibe was definitely with me that day. It was the first record I listened to. I had no idea going in who Miles was or any background on Kind Of Blue.

What was yours?

In reply to an earlier post on Sep 20, 2007 2:58:51 AM PDT
Mine was We Want Miles (1982), I thought he was totally a rock star, playing live in Japan, rocking out with electric stuff!

In reply to an earlier post on Sep 20, 2007 4:26:42 AM PDT
THE QUINTET::jazz at Masey hall
(Ch Parker,D>Gillespie..Bud Powell Max Roach Ch Mingus 1953

In reply to an earlier post on Sep 20, 2007 4:55:50 AM PDT
A. Turnage says:
Every note is etched in my soul...Kind of Blue... in particular Flamenco Sketches and Blue in Green... I'm with you, Jeffery!
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In reply to an earlier post on Sep 20, 2007 6:18:59 AM PDT
stevign says:
"COLMAN HAWKINS ENCOUNTERS BEN WEBSTER" by.....i can't remember, sorry.

The specific song that really sunk the hook was: "ROSITA", when BEN comes in and they play a "duel lead" togather, it was like Eric Clapton/Duane Allman in "Why Does Love Have To Feel So Bad" on LAYLA. It's such a good album, that I pass over it as much as I can, so as not to get burned-out on it, otherwise, I'd play it 3-4 times a week.

to TURNAGE: I'm looking just below this post I'm writing, and JAZZ GAMES "THE MENTORING CHALLENGE" is the 1st discussion. If you have any problem finding it, call amazon. They answer immediatly!

In reply to an earlier post on Sep 20, 2007 6:44:25 AM PDT
Last edited by the author on Sep 20, 2007 6:45:01 AM PDT
I'm sure you give that some thought there stevign you'll come up with who did that disc.

Seriously though, I've never heard that one I'll have to check it out. Your comparison to Duane and Eric is compelling.

Adam, Yeah Kind Of Blue is beyond great for some folks. "Etched in my soul...". Yeah.

Javier, I have "We want Miles". Great isn't it?

Benni, Thanks for checkin' in man. Haven't heard that one either.

What I hope this discussion does is get's right to crux of what people love about Jazz. That first experience is crucial. Thanks to all for sharing your First Love.

Keep 'em coming...

In reply to an earlier post on Sep 20, 2007 7:37:51 AM PDT
D. Simon says:
My earliest jazz memory is of Chris Conner's "Lullaby of Birdland". My parents joked that I could sing that tune before I could talk. I also remember a 10 inch Howard McGhee from Blue Note called simply, Vol 2 (1953). I was so happy when it was reissued in 1998 as I had never heard it without pops and scratches as I had played it over and over for so many years.

In reply to an earlier post on Sep 20, 2007 8:19:29 AM PDT
In 1953, when I was 9 years old, my parents went on vacation to Washington DC to visit my aunt and uncle. They had a son who was a lot older than me (like maybe 14) and he was really into jazz (which I had never heard of). I'm sure Mike was ordered to be nice to me so he let me hang out and he played all of these amazing records for me explaining who the players were and some of what they were doing. Two records were my favorites, Birth Of The Cool and Blues Sonata by Charlie Byrd. When we got home from vacation a package arived from Mike with those two records in it. I still have those two records and about 800 jazz CDs. Mike started me out on a lifetime of listening to jazz.

In reply to an earlier post on Sep 20, 2007 10:19:25 AM PDT
Guy J. Turck says:
For me it was George Benson's "Breezin'"

While I don't play it very much anymore, at the time it came out I was blown away. I loved his tone, chops and melodic improv. It's a very accessable album to the uninitiated. I started taking guitar lessons and eventually bought a George Benson model Ibanez guitar that I still love to play.

In reply to an earlier post on Sep 20, 2007 10:31:15 AM PDT
Denise says:
9 or 10, took my own money from babysitting and bought 'Take Five' by Dave Brubeck. Flawless and I still love it. Heard him play two nights ago in Salt Lake City and at 87, almost 88, I have yet to hear anyone else play a elegantly and sparely as did Mr. B. But that old album turned me on to the joy and effusion that personifies great jazz.

In reply to an earlier post on Sep 20, 2007 10:45:00 AM PDT
Around 1968 I was 9 years old and bought my first LP with my allowance: "Mercy, Mercy" by the Buddy Rich Big Band. I was taking drum lessons at the time and a short time later quit the drums, but have been of casual student of jazz ever since.... To this day I'm still listening to that LP.

In reply to an earlier post on Sep 20, 2007 11:35:42 AM PDT
Robert Cox says:
I'm amazed that some of you got into jazz at 9! My first jazz experience was Art Tatum. I was 16. It didn't do anything for me - way over my head. Then I heard "Julie is her Name" with Julie London and Barney Kesell. Those chords - that sultry voice. I had to hear more. I'm still hooked on chords! I came back to Tatum later. My first love is still a favourite and played regularly. Three cheers for re-issues on CD. This brings up a point re Stevign's mentoring challenge. Start with music that your student can relate to and then extend from there.

In reply to an earlier post on Sep 20, 2007 11:41:35 AM PDT
stevign says:
GEORGE:
I hope you sent him a cake with a babe in it, and a "thank you card".

In reply to an earlier post on Sep 20, 2007 11:51:21 AM PDT
M. Butler says:
Kind of Blue was one of the first and if I could only take one with me that would be it but it was Stanely Turrentines version of John Coltranes Impressions on his "Sugar" album that really got the blood pumping.

In reply to an earlier post on Sep 20, 2007 12:15:38 PM PDT
Last edited by the author on Sep 20, 2007 12:16:14 PM PDT
stevign says:
Denise:
9 or 10??? GIRL!! If you don't post on "what got you into jazz?" I'm kickin' your butt! lol

You too RICHARD, I played drums all through school, played in the "Pep-Band" and wanted to be GENE KRUPPA, but still never got into jazz.

In reply to an earlier post on Sep 20, 2007 12:35:57 PM PDT
Joe Marquez says:
Great subject, Jeffery. I'm sure that all of us are reminded of very nice memories as we reminisce about our first very own album. Mr. Poehlman's response is a very good example. In my case, buying albums consisted of 45 RPM records. My first jazz record (a 78 RPM) was Lionel Hampton's "How High the Moon", a gift from my piano playing buddy, "Toad". If not for him, I might be listening to Kenny G and John Tesh endlessly. My first album (of 45's) was "Basses Loaded" with Milt Hinton, Wendell Marshall, and Bull Ruther. My first LP was Terry Gibbs' "Vibes on Velvet". I think my favorite record (again, 78 RPM) was King Pleasure's "Moody's Mood for Love". I wore out three of them. Some of us old timers will remember how our automatic phonographs would eventually destroy the hole in the middle of the record. Thanks for the memories.

In reply to an earlier post on Sep 20, 2007 12:57:59 PM PDT
Yeah, and after that I moved to Bitches Brew, which is why I consider Kind Of Blue a "Standard Jazz" record. I mean, it's great and stuff, the modal thing, but hey, to listen for the first time "Pharaoh's Dance?" Hah! By the way, does anybody know Joe Zawinful died?

In reply to an earlier post on Sep 20, 2007 1:03:25 PM PDT
Brubeck Take 5 was my in my father collection and my earliest song I could name upon hearing immediately.

However, my collection started with Kind Of Blue.

In reply to an earlier post on Sep 20, 2007 6:53:19 PM PDT
Yes, this was a great era and what turned me on to Jazz was the free flowing imprompto BUCK CLAYTON jam session of Hucklebuck and Robins Nest followed by Christopher Columbus etc all available now as a CD set.
Trevor Lourensz

In reply to an earlier post on Sep 20, 2007 7:48:02 PM PDT
I guess it was combination of albums that got me "hooked" so to speak. There wasn't just one, there were many and here they are:

Miles Davis - Kind of Blue (of course!!!)
Pat Metheny - Bright Size Life
Bill Frisell - Where in the World?
Bill Evans - You Must Believe In Spring
Art Blakey and the Jazz Messengers - The Big Beat
Herbie Hancock - Maiden Voyage
Jan Garbarek - Witchi-Tai-To
Bobby Hutcherson - Oblique
John Coltrane - Ballads

These albums stretched my ears in so many different directions. I got a real taste of European and American jazz from an early age. Now, I think the question is: what keeps bringing you back to jazz?

For me, it's just the deep feeling jazz has. The improvisational aspect of the music keeps it alive and fresh, but I really love the harmonic language that's associated with the music. These kinds of harmonies don't really work in any other style. Jazz is also something that never leaves you. It's always there with you. It's kind of like drug. At first, it's just something for pleasure, and then it controls your life and you will do whatever it takes to get more of it. That's how I feel about it anyway.

In reply to an earlier post on Sep 20, 2007 8:33:30 PM PDT
stevign says:
to J.RICH:
With no 12 step program! lol

In reply to an earlier post on Sep 20, 2007 9:50:38 PM PDT
Donald Waits says:
George W. Poehlman,
What a beautiful story. Your cousin must have been a
great person. I hope you had the opportunity to thank
him. Some older people were responsible for intro-
ducing me to all kinds of music, classical, jazz, the
blues. I hope they are on the softest clouds in heaven.

In reply to an earlier post on Sep 20, 2007 9:58:28 PM PDT
Last edited by the author on Sep 20, 2007 10:11:31 PM PDT
Donald Waits says:
Denise.
How fortunate you were to see and hear the great Dave
Brubeck at 87. Have you seen the Martin Scorsese doc-
umentary, "The Blues"? One of the segments was "Blues
Piano" with Clint Eastwood. He was a perfect interviewer
in that he stayed out of the way and let the artists talk
and play. My favorite part was with Dave Brubeck. That
man is one of the sweetest human beings I have ever
seen. And his playing! Buy it (they are now on separate
DVD's)...

In reply to an earlier post on Sep 20, 2007 10:06:07 PM PDT
Donald Waits says:
Jeffery Gifford,
I had not really been exposed to a lot of jazz, or any
music for that matter, except on my little Philco radio
during the 40's and 50's. One day I heard Louis *yes,
that Louis) with Jack Teagarden doing "Rockin' Chair".
I immediately wanted to BE Jack Teagarden. Bought
a trombone from Sears and started lessons. My
teacher was a graduate student at the local college
and a jazz fan. He lent me records of Armstrong and
the Hot Fives and Sevens. That was IT for me.

In reply to an earlier post on Sep 20, 2007 10:22:44 PM PDT
George (if I may) Thanks for your remembrance. That's classic!

D Simon Chris Connor is great! Is that the one on Bethlehem records?

Guy , i feel like George Benson kind of got in a rut stylistically after Breezin'. But Breezin' did break some new ground at the time.

Take Five bought with babysitting money thanks Denise!, Buddy Rich ..Robert with Julie London. It's great of all of you to share these and the accompanying remembrances too.

Keep 'em coming
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Discussion in:  Jazz forum
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Initial post:  Sep 19, 2007
Latest post:  Jul 11, 2012

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