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Showing 101-125 of 404 posts in this discussion
In reply to an earlier post on Jun 19, 2012, 12:05:03 AM PDT
Brit says:
J: I read the first couple, and I was a little turned off by the protagonist's improper behavior. It made me not want to read the next one.

B: What sort of "improper behavior" do you have in mind? My tolerance level varies.

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 19, 2012, 12:33:50 AM PDT
jaime says:
My question is this.

I used to have something at the top of my screen such that I could click "favorites" or "history" and now this never appears.

If I have not written down the address of a location, and if I have not memorized it, how can I ever find it again?

Or, how can I make the "history" or the "favorites" option appear on my screen again?

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 19, 2012, 12:34:49 AM PDT
Last edited by the author on Jun 19, 2012, 12:35:46 AM PDT
jaime says:
But the thing closes right in the middle of my trying to type an email, or in the middle of my trying to post on amazon. I'm USING the feature, and it just closes, right while I'm trying to post.

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 19, 2012, 6:12:48 AM PDT
Lev says:
Hanalah: "I used to have something at the top of my screen such that I could click 'favorites' or 'history' and now this never appears."

Lev: You are referring to drop-down menus. Which drop-down menus appear at the top of your screen these days? Or have they all disappeared?

Hanalah: If I have not written down the address of a location, and if I have not memorized it, how can I ever find it again?

Lev: You should be able to find it with a search engine like Google. For example, without knowing the address of the Judaism Community here at Amazon, I could find it by going to Google and typing in a few key words, e.g.: Amazon, Judaism Community, Hanalah, jeffesq613.

Hanalah: "But the thing closes right in the middle of my trying to type an email, or in the middle of my trying to post on amazon. I'm USING the feature, and it just closes, right while I'm trying to post."

Lev: If you pause long enough--say, for example, while reading Amazon reviews, or re-reading the e-mail on which you are working, the computer will assume that you are no longer there. If, every couple of minutes, you type a word into your e-mail, or click something in Amazon, these actions should be sufficient to keep these websites from closing.

If your e-mail shuts down while you're actually typing a message, I'm completely mystified.

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 19, 2012, 10:32:06 PM PDT
jaime says:
Sometimes it takes an hour or more to find a website, and once I have found it I don't want to repeat the process.

Other times I copy an address that someone posts here. The chances of finding that post again are remote, even I copy it into a post of my own. So I'd LIKE to be able to click "favorites" and access it that way, which I used to do. But now there is no menu, and no favorites.

What happened???

And, yes, I have had an application--either Amazon or email--disappear while I am typing something into it. It is so frustrating. This started a couple of months ago. It never used to happen at all.

And in addition, if I close an appliation, it may ask, or it may simply close everything that is open.

As you see, my use of the internet has been severely compromised.

I wish I knew something to do about it, but I'm not a mavin.

Thank you, Lev, for trying to help. If I could just get back the use of "favorites" that would be hugely helpful.

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 20, 2012, 9:22:39 PM PDT
Omnireader says:
Sounds like a virus.

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 20, 2012, 9:26:48 PM PDT
Last edited by the author on Jun 20, 2012, 9:29:07 PM PDT
Omnireader says:
Do a copy of the item you want to save as a 'favorite'.
Paste it into your email as a draft and save it with a name and date so you can retrieve it.

Example:
Tehillim - Psalms - Chapter 91

1. He who dwells in the covert of the Most High will lodge in the shadow of the Almighty.
2. I shall say of the Lord [that He is] my shelter and my fortress, my God in Whom I trust.
3. For He will save you from the snare that traps from the devastating pestilence.
4. With His wing He will cover you, and under His wings you will take refuge; His truth is an encompassing shield.

Copy> open email > create message > paste > save as Draft >

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 21, 2012, 4:25:10 PM PDT
Lev says:
Hanalah says: "I'd LIKE to be able to click "favorites" and access it that way, which I used to do. But now there is no menu, and no favorites. What happened???"

Lev: Did all of the drop-down menus at the top of your screen disappear, or just 'Favorites'. Back when I had a PC, there were several times when
all the drop-down menus at the top of my screen disappeared. It was because
I pressed the wrong button. I was able to bring them all back again, too, but it was so long ago that I forget how to do it. Do you know any PC mavens whom you can call over to look? I think it would be simple to fix--for anyone who knew the trick.

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 21, 2012, 8:33:51 PM PDT
jaime says:
All of them. I guess I'll have to persuade a maven to come over.

All the mavens I know live on the other side of town. WAYYY out in the suburbs on the other side of town.

but Ill try.

Thank you.

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 22, 2012, 6:00:42 AM PDT
Lev says:
Perhaps one of the office staff in your synagogue, or one of your fellow congregation members, can help.

Posted on Jun 22, 2012, 6:23:50 AM PDT
Uncle Pinky says:
...or one of their teen-aged daughters!!

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 22, 2012, 6:03:43 PM PDT
jaime says:
Good thought, UP~!

Posted on Jun 24, 2012, 7:36:50 PM PDT
C. Gramze says:
Hanalah, I think the name for your missing things in Internet Explorer is the Toolbar. If you click the View menu you might be able to click on Toolbar and get it back. If not, I apologize, but I am relying on nothing but faint memories from 10 years ago or so when thi very thing happened to me.

Posted on Jun 24, 2012, 10:21:58 PM PDT
Allan says:
If anyone has read Lawrence Schiffman's Reclaiming the Dead Sea Scrolls: The History of Judaism, the Background of Christianity, the Lost Library of Qumran (The Anchor Yale Bible Reference Library) I'd be deeply interested in reading their comments.

Posted on Jul 5, 2012, 9:22:38 PM PDT
Emma says:
I'm reading an amazing book called As Long As I Live the life story of Aharon Margolit, recently translated into English. When my husband gave me the book (on the recommendation of his friend who owns one of the Jewish Bookstores in town who said it was amazing and they can't keep it on the shelves) I was very reticent. When you read the back blurb, it sounds very depressing. This man contracted the most severe form of polio as a toddler, and was completely paralyzed. As a nurse, I used to work with paralyzed children, and it is heartbreaking. I wasn't sure if I wanted to read about something so sad. But, he overcame all the odds and managed to recover and thrive in life. Instead of being depressing (although it is sad in parts) it is an amazing story of a resilient person who has lived a very admirable life. He also overcame a speech disorder that had rendered him practically mute, and as an adult was diagnosed with a malignant tumor and 6 weeks to live, which he also miraculously overcame. After he shared his story, he has become a popular speaker in Israel, and his book has inspired many people. Even Rabbi Chaim Kanievsky (the husband of the Rebbetzin who's book I read before this) read the Hebrew version cover to cover (amazing from a Rav who barely does anything but study Torah) and said that it gave him "chizuk" (strength). The Rav of our shul mentions this man and his story from time to time in his speeches to the congregation as well. Anyway, since I'm enjoying it I wanted to put it out there for all of you. All the best!

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 10, 2012, 2:01:31 PM PDT
C. Gramze says:
allen says: If anyone has read Lawrence Schiffman's Reclaiming the Dead Sea Scrolls: The History of Judaism, the Background of Christianity, the Lost Library of Qumran (The Anchor Yale Bible Reference Library) I'd be deeply interested in reading their comments

CGramze says: Yes, I am reading this book now. I really like the way it presents the Dead Sea scrolls as Jewish. They are not mainstream Pharisaic Jewish, but seeing the differences between the Pharisees, and Sadducees, and the Qumran sect helps me understand how it all developed into what we have now. For far too long the scrolls have been the exclusive domain of Christians, as if the people who wrote them were Christians almost 200 years early. It is nice that the non-Tanach documents are finally being published, particularly the Halakhic Letter. Now that there are Jewish scholars doing the translations it is going faster; the Christian scholars were wholly unable to understand and translate many of the documents that are simple for a Jewish scholar.

Posted on Jul 13, 2012, 11:47:04 AM PDT
C. Gramze says:
In addition to reading "Reclaiming the Dead Sea Scrolls" I am reading the "Etz Hayim Study Guide." It has the oft-overlooked essays from the back of "Etz Hayim" with study questions. I am enjoying learning about the variety of ways to read and interpret Torah. For somebody not sure of where they stand in terms of Orthodox, Onservative, or Reform this book would be very helpful.

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 13, 2012, 4:15:04 PM PDT
Dakotawolf says:
I recently bought the Etz Hayim Study Guide. It has some very interesting essays in it.

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 15, 2012, 6:14:50 PM PDT
C. Gramze says:
Yes, I particularly like the way that it gives a balanced view, with the differing opinions each being presented by an adherent of that opinion. That eliminates bias.

Posted on Jul 16, 2012, 7:09:23 PM PDT
yba says:
Shaye Co0hen's "Significance of Yavneh" is anexcellent book comprised of essays on the subject. He also has lectures available online at Itunes at no charge if anybody wishes to sit in a Harvard classroom! I am enjoying them!

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 16, 2012, 7:19:06 PM PDT
Last edited by the author on Jul 16, 2012, 7:27:50 PM PDT
Omnireader says:
EDIT From a post by Gershom

1.) Introduction to the Old Testament/Hebrew Bible
See lecture here: http://oyc.yale.edu/religious-studies/rlst-145/lecture-2

2.) Introduction to New Testament History and Literature (http://oyc.yale.edu/religious-studies/rlst-152)

[See: Jul 9, 2012 10:41:53 AM PDT
Last edited by the author on Jul 9, 2012 12:02:28 PM PDT

Gershom says:]

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 16, 2012, 7:41:40 PM PDT
C. Gramze says:
I sort of wonder about taking religious studies classes from Yale, a facility to educate Protestant clergy. But the professor teaching these is Jewish? I could enjoy watching lectures on my iPad, and learning something. I like iTunes U.

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 16, 2012, 8:50:56 PM PDT
Omnireader says:
The lecturer is Christine Hayes. Apparently she is Jewish.
She received the Salo Baron Prize for a first book in Jewish Thought and Literature, presented by the American Academy of Jewish Research, 1999.
The American Academy for Jewish Research (AAJR). AAJR is the oldest professional organization of Judaica scholars in North America. The Academy sponsors several programs, among them the Baron prize for the best first book in the fields of Judaic studies.

See her wiki profile here:http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Christine_Hayes

http://www.ajsnet.org/chairs.php?id=76

Description of the lecture on Introduction to the Old Testament (sic). {Omi note: This course is for students who may not be Jewish and would not be familiar with the name Tanakh.}
[In this lecture, the Hebrew Bible is understood against the background of Ancient Near Eastern culture. Drawing from and critiquing the work of Yehezkel Kaufmann, the lecture compares the religion of the Hebrew Bible with the cultures of the Ancient Near East. Two models of development are discussed: an evolutionary model of development in which the Hebrew Bible is continuous with Ancient Near Eastern culture and a revolutionary model of development in which the Israelite religion is radically discontinuous with Ancient Near Eastern culture.]

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 17, 2012, 2:37:57 AM PDT
yba says:
Omnireader,
My thanks to both you and Gershom.
btw: did you mention you had been to Davenport (North of Santa Cruz)?

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 17, 2012, 3:57:06 AM PDT
Omnireader says:
yep
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Discussion in:  Judaism forum
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Initial post:  May 21, 2012
Latest post:  Dec 20, 2012

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