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Customer Discussions > Kindle forum

overpricing on some kindle e-books


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Showing 1-25 of 26 posts in this discussion
Posted on Apr 22, 2012, 2:21:12 PM PDT
Bufo Calvin says:
Two things:

There is no limit to the number of Kindles and apps that can be registered to the same account. They can all read the same book for one download price, but usually only six at a time. The limit on number of simultaneous devices is set by the publishers on each title: unless it says otherwise on the book's Amazon product page, that number is six. Some books have fewer licenses; some are unlimited.

Amazon also agrees that e-books should cost less than p-books (paperbooks). There are two royalty rates for publishers that use its Kindle Direct Publishing: 35% and 70%. One of the requirements for the 70% rate (along with not blocking text-to-speech access, enabling lending, and so on) is that the price set by the publisher for the e-book (Amazon can discount those...they aren't under the Agency Model) is at least 20% less than the price set by the publisher for the lowest priced paper edition.

https://kdp.amazon.com/self-publishing/help?topicId=A29FL26OKE7R7B

In reply to an earlier post on Apr 22, 2012, 1:34:13 PM PDT
Done says:
[Customers don't think this post adds to the discussion. Show post anyway. Show all unhelpful posts.]

In reply to an earlier post on Apr 22, 2012, 1:13:11 PM PDT
Tinker-bella says:
I've found the following rule to apply in a free market society (whether or not I like or agree with it):

Should be less expensive to produce ≠ Should be less expensive to purchase

In reply to an earlier post on Apr 22, 2012, 1:07:57 PM PDT
Done says:
Thank you Robert L. Hunter. My thoughts expressed much more eloquently.

In reply to an earlier post on Apr 22, 2012, 1:05:46 PM PDT
Done says:
Ferret Momma:

You really should read this thread by Bufo Calvin. As it did for me, it will clarify and provide perspective on the current publishing market.
http://www.amazon.com/gp/forum/cd/discussion.html/ref=cm_cd_fp_ef_tft_tp?ie=UTF8&cdForum=Fx2FVB1UN5K77GN&cdThread=Tx3JI9DO60GHY7B

In reply to an earlier post on Apr 22, 2012, 1:04:32 PM PDT
Last edited by the author on Apr 22, 2012, 1:09:23 PM PDT
R Lee Hunter says:
PP&B (paper, plate/printing and binding) have always been a modest component of paperback book prices, but - and it's a big but - the cost of paperback returns to publisher is a huge cost element; the cost of physical distribution from plant to stores is another significant factor, and inventory carrying costs are a 3rd cost component that is missing from the eBook production and distribution model . IMO ebook prices do not fairly represent the inherent savings on these 3 expense types; all other things being equal (ie editorial, sg&a and risk amortization) eBooks should be less expensive than their paper counterparts.

In reply to an earlier post on Apr 22, 2012, 1:02:02 PM PDT
KessaJo says:
Oh wow! No wonder you were upset about the prices. LOL!

In reply to an earlier post on Apr 22, 2012, 12:58:40 PM PDT
Done says:
Thank you Bufo Calvin!! That was a fascinating and informative read. In addition, as a result of your above link, I've discovered that I can save some money by adding my daughter's kindle to my account. Now, I can stop paying double--I've been buying the same favourite books/authors for both kindles.

In reply to an earlier post on Apr 22, 2012, 12:43:13 PM PDT
KessaJo says:
Printing and paper costs were ALWAYS a small part of this process.
******************
I have always thought this - nice to see that I was right. =)

I often wonder how upset people would be if they saw that making a paper book does not cost as much as some people think - that there are other charges that make the cost & eBooks would also have these same costs.

In reply to an earlier post on Apr 22, 2012, 12:42:01 PM PDT
Last edited by the author on Apr 22, 2012, 12:43:05 PM PDT
Done, on the right of the main forum page, you will see a search box that you can use to search all threads within a forum. It's in the middle of the page to the right of the listing of all the threads.

It's labelled - "Search Customer Discussions"

Posted on Apr 22, 2012, 12:37:56 PM PDT
Frank Tuttle says:
I've probably said this a thousand times on this forum, but here we go again.

The major costs associated with a publisher bringing any book to the market are costs associated with paying editors, first line editors, cover artists, marketing people, technical people, promotions, advertising, author advances and royalties, and of course a thousand other expenses -- offices don't run themselves. Books do not magically spring forth, whole and fully formatted, when the author types THE END at the bottom of a manuscript. And professionals don't work for free.

Printing and paper costs were ALWAYS a small part of this process. Maybe ten to twelve percent. So now you're getting an ebook instead of a paper book -- expecting the ebook to cost pennies on the paper dollar is neither realistic nor reasonable.

In reply to an earlier post on Apr 22, 2012, 12:36:20 PM PDT
Bufo Calvin says:
Done, you may find this thread on the Agency Model interesting:

http://www.amazon.com/gp/forum/cd/discussion.html/ref=cm_cd_fp_ef_tft_tp?ie=UTF8&cdForum=Fx2FVB1UN5K77GN&cdThread=Tx3JI9DO60GHY7B

In reply to an earlier post on Apr 22, 2012, 12:36:00 PM PDT
KessaJo says:
Look at this Cuisinart ICE-21R Frozen Yogurt, Ice Cream & Sorbet Maker, Red

The price is $10 less or more depending on the color. Nothing else is different. Just the color.

Why don't you go post about how unfair it is, because the only difference is the color?

In reply to an earlier post on Apr 22, 2012, 12:34:41 PM PDT
Bufo Calvin says:
Done, what may be confusing here is that Amazon isn't selling the Kindle edition of Fifty Shades of Grey, due to something called the Agency Model. They are only acting as a sales agent for the publisher, and are unable to discount the Kindle store book for that reason.

Amazon publicly fought this arrangement (they commonly discounted e-books before it, just as they still do with paperbooks). The US Department of Justice filed suit this week against Apple and five of the largest US publishers for this practice, and a couple of the publishers have already said they'll settle.

My guess is that you may not be in the USA, since I'm seeing the Kindle version for $9.99 (you may have VAT...Value Added Tax...where you are, for example).

You can see the impact of the discounting when it is available.

Paperback list price (set by the publisher): $15.95
Amazon's discounted paperback price: $9.57

Kindle store price (set by the publisher): $9.99

So, what is happening in this case is that Amazon has discounted the paper price to below the e-book price...which they are unable to discount (unless and until the Department of Justice suit or something else changes that).

Comparison shopping is always a good idea. I don't take into account just the price, of course, but customer service, convenience, and so on.

In reply to an earlier post on Apr 22, 2012, 12:31:43 PM PDT
Done says:
Basic economics. Production costs as well supply and demand determine price of products. I'm hoping once there is more competition, e-book prices will drop since productions costs are minimal.

In reply to an earlier post on Apr 22, 2012, 12:30:21 PM PDT
Last edited by the author on Apr 22, 2012, 12:30:52 PM PDT
More to the point, as RD Clark pointed out, there are indications that the Canadian government ensures Kobo (actually Canadian publishers) charges you a lesser price...

In reply to an earlier post on Apr 22, 2012, 12:25:45 PM PDT
KessaJo says:
I can't understand why they would charge more for the electronic version, since printing costs so much more
******************
How many products do you know where the price is based the cost to make it? If that were the case, then just about everything would cost less.

In reply to an earlier post on Apr 22, 2012, 12:25:05 PM PDT
Done says:
Wow. You are right. I am from Canada. I must be really green. Someone posted that they have the price listed at $9.99. I had no idea that as a Canadian, kindle charges me more!

In reply to an earlier post on Apr 22, 2012, 12:21:39 PM PDT
Last edited by the author on Apr 22, 2012, 12:23:04 PM PDT
R. D. Clark says:
Whenever a poster says a book is cheaper from Kobo than from Amazon, I know without looking they are in Canada.

There is something wonky going on with regard to Kobo -- a Canadian company -- being able to sell ebooks to Canadians for less than Amazon CA. [Interesting. The forum software inserted that http there.]

In reply to an earlier post on Apr 22, 2012, 12:21:39 PM PDT
Done says:
Thank you. I'm an avid reader and have been buying from kindle for 2 years. I thought I was saving money while saving a few trees. I can't understand why they would charge more for the electronic version, since printing costs so much more--I'm guessing something to do with publication rights. (?) kindle store posts "This price was set by the publisher". If so, then how do sony and kobo sell for less?

I'm not sure what you mean by the "a search (right side of page) for pricing or Agency Model"

In reply to an earlier post on Apr 22, 2012, 12:19:20 PM PDT
KessaJo says:
Yeah, but the OP is from Canada - it might be a different price there.

Posted on Apr 22, 2012, 12:16:28 PM PDT
B. Marks says:
I just looked and that book is $9.99 for the Kindle edition on Amazon.

Barry

Posted on Apr 22, 2012, 12:16:24 PM PDT
Fud53 says:
Not me. I know for instance that amazon doesn't set book prices...kindle or paper. The point is you can always shop around, but if you buy something because it's cheaper you may end up with a product that's less than satisfactory.

In reply to an earlier post on Apr 22, 2012, 12:16:17 PM PDT
KessaJo says:
If you don't like eBook prices, you can always get paper books.

I prefer eBooks, so I will pay the asking price.

Posted on Apr 22, 2012, 12:11:18 PM PDT
There have been thousands of threads on this topic. I suggest a search (right side of page) for pricing or Agency Model
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This discussion

Discussion in:  Kindle forum
Participants:  11
Total posts:  26
Initial post:  Apr 22, 2012
Latest post:  Apr 22, 2012

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