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Customer Discussions > Kindle forum

Kindle Fire HD - ethernet adaptor


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Showing 1-25 of 197 posts in this discussion
Initial post: Dec 25, 2012 11:31:25 AM PST
Is there an adaptor available for the Kindle Fire HD that would allow me to connect it to an Ethernet cable?

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 25, 2012 11:58:59 AM PST
no

Posted on Jan 9, 2013 9:05:40 AM PST
[Deleted by the author on Feb 14, 2013 2:13:09 PM PST]

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 9, 2013 9:07:53 AM PST
MikeJW says:
You're not telling Amazon anything here. We're just Kindle users.

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 9, 2013 9:13:16 AM PST
Stinky McGee says:
Ok no problem deleting that post, but you don't think Amazon developers check out this forum to see what features additions people are whining about?

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 9, 2013 9:15:48 AM PST
Last edited by the author on Jan 9, 2013 9:18:30 AM PST
**M€¥@** says:
It would be a backwards step to start including ethernet ports on devices.

By their very nature, they are designed to be portable, which means wireless. The constant drive to improve battery life is driven by this need also. It made sense to have wired connections on huge desktop systems. But tablet devices are meant to be wireless. In all my years of using Kindles and being around these forums, this is the first time I have seen this "feature" asked for.

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 9, 2013 9:18:29 AM PST
Stinky McGee says:
True. However we are talking about allowing ethernet connectivity through the microusb port.

Posted on Jan 9, 2013 9:43:22 AM PST
denzelnuke says:
Yes, there is a device. It's called a wireless router. They even make small wireless routers you could carry with you.

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 9, 2013 10:03:22 AM PST
Stinky McGee says:
I don't like wifi. There are recent studies that demonstrate that EMF induces a physiological response. This includes studies that suggest that EMF can disrupt sleep patterns and ones that show memory impairment in mice. Personally I feel a presence of chaos in the air with wireless turned on.
I simply want to state that I'd like Amazon to include/unlock ethernet through microusb connectivity in a future update. I understand that this is currently a minority opinion, although why not ask?
A USB ethernet adapter for Android is currently mildly popular (http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B007RTACDM/ref=oh_details_o00_s01_i01) so maybe there are people out there who would appreciate this capability for Kindle?

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 9, 2013 10:25:15 AM PST
Erich says:
"There are recent studies that demonstrate that EMF induces a physiological response. This includes studies that suggest that EMF can disrupt sleep patterns and ones that show memory impairment in mice."

Oh goody, I'll play. Can you provide a citation?

"Personally I feel a presence of chaos in the air with wireless turned on. "

I would LOVE to set up a blinded trial for this. Love love love. I bet you $10,000 I could turn on and off a wifi signal in your presence and you wouldn't be able to tell me when it was on or off at a rate better than guessing.

And just fyi, Amazon is pretty much never going to add wired ethernet capability to any Kindle. It's just not going to happen.

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 9, 2013 10:34:12 AM PST
Stinky McGee says:
Man there are some haters on here!

A.F. Fragopoulou, et al., Whole body exposure with GSM 900 MHz affects spatial memory in mice,
Pathophysiology (2009), doi:10.1016/j.pathophys.2009.11.002

Ferreri, Florinda, et al. "Mobile phone emissions and human brain excitability." Annals of neurology 60.2 (2006): 188-196.

Blank, Martin, and Reba Goodman. "Electromagnetic fields stress living cells." Pathophysiology 16.2 (2009): 71-78.

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 9, 2013 10:39:01 AM PST
Last edited by the author on Jan 9, 2013 10:46:31 AM PST
Erich says:
"Man there are some haters on here!"

You must be new to the Internet. This place is as cuddly as a 2 day old kitten.

I looked up the first two articles. Interesting, but hardly conclusive of anything. Given that the neuro system is electrically based, it's not surprising that EMF signals would interact in some way. But there's a big leap between a mouse model and actual human effects. Huge. I don't have time to write a properly detailed rebuttal to you claims, but there's lot of room to critique your conclusion (that EMF is dangerous).

(For the record, I'm an MD-turned-research-scientist. I work with animal models and human physiology on a daily basis.)

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 9, 2013 10:41:25 AM PST
**M€¥@** says:
Just keep the kittens away from the WiFi. It makes them mean.

Posted on Jan 9, 2013 10:42:28 AM PST
"Man there are some haters on here!"

Um, you just told a forum full of people using wi fi devices that you think wi fi is "bad". What did you expect?

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 9, 2013 10:49:19 AM PST
Erich says:
I thought it turned them in to Gremlins... or is that what happens when you feed them after midnight?

wifi off: Kitten
wifi on: Gremlin
wifi off: Kitten
wifi on: Gremlin
Wife: Honey, stop messing with the wifi router, the cat isn't looking so great.
Me: But this is FUN!
wifi off: kitten...

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 9, 2013 10:51:00 AM PST
Erich says:
Actually, he just told us that if we were mice, our memory would... wait, I forgot the rest.

Darn it.

Posted on Jan 9, 2013 11:32:34 AM PST
B. Marks says:
Most tablets of any kind won't accept an ethernet adapter. I don't think Android even supplies drivers for that, although I'm not sure. There are a few that do.

Barry

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 9, 2013 11:38:13 AM PST
T. Cannon says:
So how is it hating to ask for citations? Especially since you have them. Now this is not my field but your most recent study is 2009. It is 2013, (barely). Nothing more recent on the subject? A lot can change for better or worse in 3 + years.

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 9, 2013 11:38:54 AM PST
LMAO.

"Mooom! He's doing it again!!"

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 9, 2013 11:48:13 AM PST
Solution: Aluminum Foil Deflector Beanie: Practical Mind Control Protection for Paranoids

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 9, 2013 11:53:59 AM PST
Just Peachy says:
[Customers don't think this post adds to the discussion. Show post anyway. Show all unhelpful posts.]

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 9, 2013 12:17:26 PM PST
[Deleted by the author on Jan 9, 2013 12:17:46 PM PST]

Posted on Jan 9, 2013 12:18:28 PM PST
Last edited by the author on Jan 9, 2013 12:20:40 PM PST
Bridget Ruth says:
In the world of scientific research, 2009 is not "recent".

Also, the whole body exposure was using W/kg below the limit set by the FCC. So points for not quadrupling the dose and trying to call the results relevant. However, they don't say anything about the volume of tissue that dose is being measured over in the abstract, and that is an important part of that kind of measurement. They probably do in the results, but I'm not wasting my time.

So, on a person 1.6W/kg over 1g of tissue is the limit in America. That's the exposure getting to the parts of you directly next to your cellular phone. Obviously the opposite side of your head is getting a lower exposure, and your toes are getting even less exposure (probably approaching zero exposure, can you see where I'm going with this yet?).

With a WiFi signal, you'd have to measure the dose your entire body is getting (assuming you're not holding the router in your hand). And it's much lower than that produced by a cell phone. So if the cell phone is only considered "maybe it might someday lead to cancer if you use it several hours a day" then the WiFi is not even approaching that list.

"a person absorbs less radiation from sitting in a wi-fi hotspot for a year, says the HPA, than from a 20-minute cell phone call." (http://www.wired.com/wiredscience/2007/05/nothing_to_fear/ and yes I do see the irony that this article is even older than the studies you posted, but it's listing standard measurements that haven't changed).

The one paper you listed is cells in a dish. Yeah . . . That's basically not at all applicable to an actual human being (trust me, I work with cells). So we can basically cross that paper off as not applying to your "issue".

And the two other papers are about cell phone emissions. Given my paragraph about cell phone versus WiFi emissions, I think I've explained why those papers also don't really apply.

Scientisted.

Edited because I can't spell today.

ETA: Scientisted in as brief amount of time as possible considering I actually did look up all three papers and read their abstracts on PubMed, as well as googling the limits on cell phone emissions in the US.

Posted on Jan 9, 2013 12:40:58 PM PST
JimmyTheD says:
Wow, I am LOVING this pure science stuff.

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 9, 2013 12:47:54 PM PST
Bridget Ruth says:
But the real question is . . .

Do you like my made up word? It doesn't have quite the same pizzazz as "lawyered" but I still quite like it.
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Initial post:  Dec 25, 2012
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