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In reply to an earlier post on May 1, 2012, 1:36:14 PM PDT
Last edited by the author on May 1, 2012, 1:41:48 PM PDT
jnagarya: "People who know English and grammar often use that knowledge to make themselves feel better than the ones who don't."

An inadequate's presumption with no facts for it in evidence."

Thank you for providing the evidence I did not include.

I am defending the right of anyone to do as they please and not be told they are "wrong" for not following arbitrary choices made by others. They are capable of deciding for themselves what is important and should be allowed to do so without being subjected to the pompous and the demeaning. As I said, most people do not care. That is their choice.

In reply to an earlier post on May 1, 2012, 1:48:42 PM PDT
JNagarya:

An American school boy once made 13 errors in spelling a 5 letter word.

He spelled the word usage as yowzitch. He used 8 incorrect letters and none of the correct ones. (From Ripley's "Believe It or Not."

In reply to an earlier post on May 1, 2012, 1:50:16 PM PDT
"He spelled the word usage as yowzitch. He used 8 incorrect letters and none of the correct ones. (From Ripley's "Believe It or Not."

And it got him in the newspaper! Grammar Nazis, eat your hearts out!

In reply to an earlier post on May 1, 2012, 1:51:07 PM PDT
Hikari:

Using horticulture in a sentence: "You can lead a horticulture but you can't make her think."

Posted on May 1, 2012, 1:53:37 PM PDT
"And that is your excuse for being the same as they. And that makes you a hypocrite"

Reminds me of the scene in "Catch 22" when Alan Arkin says he doesn't want to fly any more missions because the enemy is trying to kill him.

Martin Sheen: "What if everyone thought that way?"

Alan Arkin: "Then I'd be a **** fool is think any differently."

Jnagarya: Can you please proofread these posts for me? I have better things to do with my time. Thanks!

In reply to an earlier post on May 1, 2012, 1:54:18 PM PDT
Hikari says:
@TAS
Re. Morse for a buck . . .
I know . . I thought it was a misprint, too.

These are just individual episodes, not whole seasons, but I thought I'd be interested in those two particular ones.

AmazingMedia out of Ohio had a pretty good assortment of individual episodes, all in "Very Good" condition--we will see about that when they arrive. But I thought it was a sign I was supposed to get those.

Sgt. Lewis is just a teddy bear of law enforcement. Whately still has some of those patented expressions, though as a mature DI has lost some of the puppy-dog eagerness of those early days. His Geordie accent has toned down a lot, too.

I was a bit surprised at the cheekiness that was allowed on televison in the '80s . . .Patrick Malahide as the suspect informs a colleage that Inspector Morse is going to be a general pain in the rectal region . . and then later on he gives him the finger!! The actual finger!!

The citizens of Oxford are extremely belligerent to their police force for such a well-heeled area, I must say.

In reply to an earlier post on May 1, 2012, 1:56:30 PM PDT
JNagarya:

It's is a contraction for it is.
Its is a possessive of it.
Simple enough. Even I can understand it.

In reply to an earlier post on May 1, 2012, 2:04:25 PM PDT
JNagarya:

As my father taught me:

When the letter C you spy,
place the E before the I.
If you do not spy the C
place I before the E
But either, neither, leisure and seize
are acceptions, if you please.

"Nobody else thinks its important." "it's" would be correct here.

In reply to an earlier post on May 1, 2012, 2:07:20 PM PDT
Last edited by the author on May 1, 2012, 2:36:31 PM PDT
Tomas:

I certainly did notice it. The design of the gate to the workhouse for one and many others.

Also many of the gadgets Rex Harrison used in "My Fair Lady" were copies of those used in "Pygmalion." Very observant, Tom.

In reply to an earlier post on May 1, 2012, 2:13:46 PM PDT
douglasG says:
Your comments are supplying ample evidence.

Thanks

Posted on May 1, 2012, 2:32:03 PM PDT
Tomas A.

I received my copy of "The Wrong Box" and decided to proof it before commenting. It's everything you say it is.
A great transfer from a fine print. It is in 1.85:1 anamorphic wide screen. What a hilarious picture. There are so many great moments in it: Scenes with Ralph Richardson and John Mills, Peter Sellers as Dr. Pratt. How was anyone ever able to keep a straight face while they were filming? Wilfrid Lawson was hilarious as the butler "Peacock" although it was clear that he was not in good shape. He died of a heart attack at the age of 66 the year the film was released in 1966.

Look, I know the Busby Berkley musicals are super-camp, but they're fun to watch. In the dance number "Lullaby of Broadway" from "Gold Diggers of 1935," you hear the orchestra play the song approximately 136 times.

On the subject of spelling, the great playwright George S. Kaufman, known for his acerbic wit, received a manuscript from a young author requesting Kaufman to write a forward for his book. Kaufman noticed quite a few glaring spelling errors. He returned the manuscript with a note: "I've never been very good at it myself, but I am quite certain that there is only one z in iz.
Your reply to Bruce G. Taylor's post:
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In reply to an earlier post on May 1, 2012, 2:33:15 PM PDT
Hikari:

How did you research them on Amazon? I ran Morse and Lewis on Ebay too, as you can sometimes get a Buy It Now option bargain there. (I am not on lunch break and desperately trying to sell my dvds: Anyone want Joseph Andrews, Leave Her to Heaven, Menage, Coming Apart, Hunger, Hammett, Endless Night, Night Mother, Battle of
Algiers, 1776, I Am a Fugitive from a Chain Gang etc.? No? Join the crowd.Neither does anyon else, apparently.)

Guess I should just run Morse or Lewis on Amazon again and see what emerges, huh? AFTER I sell some old stuff and get some money, that is.

Once again, I have had ANOTHER package that I bought postage for oneline disappear without a trace and no tracking information. This is the fourth one in the last three weeks! As soon as I get a little ahead, I have to refund someone's money. I just sold "Get Out Your Handkerchiefs", however which should cover it.

Well, given his experiences, Lewis would logically have changed some, right? Still a decent guy, but a little sadder and wiser now, no?

Something that surprises me is that our PBS stations now EDIT UK programs for language, nudity, etc. This only started recently. All of them, even the one in conservative Orange County, used to show programs uncut. Not any more. I have no idea what accounts for this. But, I suspect if they show the Patrick Malahide episode now he will no longer be as blunt with the Inspector regarding his rectal area.

But, you know, it is, I think, the upper middle class regions that are belligerant with the police. They are not intimidated by them. After all, they own them, don't they?

And anyway, you know an education makes you superior--and snarky.

In reply to an earlier post on May 1, 2012, 2:36:41 PM PDT
bgtaylor: "It's is a contraction for it is.
Its is a possessive of it."

Would the world be a lesser place if we just left out the apostrophe entirely, from both words? Of course not. In context it would be obvious what was meant, no? So why does anyone care? Pedantry and to demonstrate that they KNOW. Its (it's) just insecurity and ego. If a person can master a subject--any subject--it makes them feel better about the world around them, as if they can, in some small way, control it. All illusion. Or delusion.

In reply to an earlier post on May 1, 2012, 2:58:24 PM PDT
brucegtaylor:

I did my graduate thesis on David Lean so I have analyzed all his films pretty closely. Its actually shocking that a director who was once as inventive as Carol Reed would do something like that. Yet, he managed to miss one essential quality of Lean's film: the social commentary. Despite the fact that Lean was locked into Dickens' "happy ending", the movie does not leave you with a feeling of all sweetness and light. In the back of your mind, though it may have turned out well for Oliver himself, you can't forget the poverty and crime and abandonment. Reed's film wants you to leave the theatre with your head in the clouds, happy in the essential goodness of Mankind. Lean is having none of that.

Sadly, My Fair Lady was slavish to Pygmalion in one essential way too many: they retained the ending of the film, rather than the play. In fact, it seems to have been composed and shot almost identically! Cukor didn't so much direct the film as he embalmed it.

In reply to an earlier post on May 1, 2012, 3:04:56 PM PDT
bgtaylor:

Glad you were happy with The Wrong Box. Sometimes there are problems with those dvdrs, made upon request, but not with The Wrong Box, thankfully. I assume they are made from the best source available. AT least I like to think so because they are not inexpensive.

From start to finish I think it has as many laughs as any film I can think of off the top of my head. I know Bryan Forbes was always finding ways to squeeze his wife into his films, but she is letter perfect here. And awfully pretty, so who cares?

Did you ever see the movie Act One? In it Jason Robards plays George S. Kaufman. Its not much of a film, but Robards, as is usual, is worth sitting through the film for. (Never end a sentence with a preposition.)

I just cannot watch the film of Mr. Berkley. They just bore me to death. I just cannot admire style without content. I'd rather have the opposite, though a melding of the two gives you, of course, Art.

In reply to an earlier post on May 1, 2012, 3:44:07 PM PDT
Thomas A:

There are so many quotes attributed to Kaufman. He was a fine Bridge player and had no patience with an inept partner. On one occasion after his partner had made a particularly bad blunder, Kaufman stared at him over the top of his glasses: "I realize you only learned to play this game today. But what time today?"

In reply to an earlier post on May 1, 2012, 3:58:18 PM PDT
Last edited by the author on May 1, 2012, 3:59:07 PM PDT
Tomas:

How about spelling it as its or itz and accepting either as being correct. From there I can imagine all sorts of possibilities. Language is a discipline, like music. We've come a long way from Beethoven to performers today making millions who couldn't read or play the first four bars of a Beethoven sonata. But what difference does that make? The public likes them and they're rich. They have the advantage of being just as musically illiterate as their public.

In reply to an earlier post on May 1, 2012, 4:38:14 PM PDT
Hikari says:
@tas
I wouldn't call it 'research' so much as a happy accident.

I looked up some Morse episodes on here to get some background and out of curiosity checked out the used copies. This one vendor had these two so incredibly cheap, I went to their storefront to see what else they had. That's how I got all my Morse omnibuii (?) I wanted to have a few souvenirs of Morse, but I think I will probably more likely to invest in "Lewis".

>>>I think, the upper middle class regions that are belligerant with the police. They are not intimidated by them.

I find that it is remarkably the same with the lower class regions as well. Leaving only the bourgeoisie to respect law and order.

Tonight was Lord of the Flies/Clockwork Orange/One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest Junior Edition at the library. Respect for law and order, minimal to nil.

In reply to an earlier post on May 1, 2012, 5:05:45 PM PDT
bgtaylor: re language

All I am trying to say is that, yeah, we learned the rules, we know them, but once you know them you can use or ignore them at will. You have to take into consideration who you are trying to communicate with, because that is the goal, right? I am not going to use the same vocabulary, or syntax, in talking to people I work with, or with my wife as I am with people I know are more educated or have a more comprehensive awareness. I am not going to use the same metaphors to make a point or the same references. You use what the people you are with are going to understand.

That only makes common sense. And to insist on using outdated, arbitrary modes of expression merely because some little old lady teachers from our youths deemed them "proper" just doesn't carry much weight in the real world. A scientist isn't going to try to carry on a conversation with me about quantum physics. He might discuss Newton's laws because those I can relate to and more or less understand.

By the same token, I am not going to write a post here the same way I went about writing my thesis. (Besides you'd be even more bored than you are now.) And I NEVER, EVER correct anyone's grammar. I might ask them to explain if I don't understand, but then that's the point.

And, yes, I knew all of this when I was studying it and disliked myself for going through the motions of the paper chase. Which is one reason I changed my field of study to film in Grad school. Not that those professors were any less rigid and nonsensical--but it was sure more fun.

In reply to an earlier post on May 1, 2012, 5:15:27 PM PDT
Hikari:

I made a couple of sales (Get Out Your Handkerchiefs and Hammett) so when the money gets to my account I will run Morse on Amazon and see if I can get lucky. I don't mind buying individual episodes if its a bargain. Absolutely no one is televising them now so its the only game in town. Guess I could try the library but, as I said, I will need to get my own card. My wife won't let me use hers for dvds--she thinks I won't return them without incurring massive fines!

The upper classes don't need "the law"; they have their own. And the lower classes feel they do not serve them and are therefore not impressed. (Joseph Conrad wrote about this brilliantly in The Secret Agent. Of course, Hitchcock in his dreadful film version completely ignored that subtext.)That only leaves the middle class to be intimidated.

Who was it said that the upper class keeps the lower class around to keep the middle class scared?

Lord of the Flies, Clockwork Orange, Cuckoo's Nest? Junior edition at the library? I am confused what that means. Some kind of program? Book club?

I love Peter Brook's film of Lord of the Flies, much better than the remake. An extended metaphor that is still most disturbing--as is the novel of course. I once had a discussion on here about how Kubrick expanded--and in my opinion--improved Burgess' novel; he certainly made it more complex. But not everyone agrees.

Would you believe I have never read Cuckoo's Nest? And I was even living in San Francisco the same time as Ken Kesey and his Merry Pranksters!

If "law and order" was truly about law and order, they would get a lot more respect.

In reply to an earlier post on May 1, 2012, 11:03:08 PM PDT
Balok says:
@JNagarya:

> "Shall" is imperative; "will" is desultory.

BZZT. But thanks for playing.

In reply to an earlier post on May 1, 2012, 11:10:16 PM PDT
Balok says:
@Thomas A. Stith:

> I have alwasy felt that Conrad was one of the greatest writers in the English language

I was going to list this as a symptom of mental illness, but as you know, in your case that's not something that I feel comfortable joking about.

> To me, his meticulous command of the language is hypnotic

To me, he has more Style than Vidal Sassoon, which makes him nearly impossible to read. And, as I said, he frequently leaves clues in his writing (I was going to use a metaphor along the lines of "like a dog leaves 'clues' on the sidewalk" before I thought better of it) that he was not a native speaker of English.

> What I found interesting about Nabokov was not just the fluidity of his prose, but his mastery of puns
> and jokes using the language, something I would generally attribute to someone to whom it was a
> native language.

As I pointed out in my previous post, Nabokov spoke English as a child, which means that it was all but a native language. According to the ever-reliable Wikipedia, Nabokov could read and write in English before he could in Russian.

In reply to an earlier post on May 1, 2012, 11:21:36 PM PDT
Balok says:
@Ramona:

> Balok, are your Blu-Ray players multi-regional also?

I think so (I don't own one). Various web sites that offer them for sale say that they can handle PAL or NTSC playback, which kind of implies multi-region, and U.S. sites such as 220-electronics.com claim that they are multi-region. For example, 220-electronics.com, with which I am not affiliated in any way, says that the Pioneer BDP-330 (http://www.220-electronics.com/dvd/Pioneer_BDP330_region_free_bluray.htm) will play any DVD on any TV or your money back.

In reply to an earlier post on May 1, 2012, 11:23:54 PM PDT
Balok says:
@Bruce G. Taylor:

> But either, neither, leisure and seize
> are acceptions, if you please.

I know of at least one ancient scientist who would point out that your list of exceptions is incomplete.

In reply to an earlier post on May 1, 2012, 11:26:32 PM PDT
Balok says:
@Bruce G. Taylor:

> In the dance number "Lullaby of Broadway" from "Gold Diggers of 1935," you hear the orchestra play
> the song approximately 136 times.

How many times do they play "I Only Have Eyes for You" in _Dames_? It sure feels like it's about 7,942, but I lost count somewhere around 300.
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