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Customer Discussions > Murder Mystery forum

why are contemporary mysteries so bad?


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Showing 26-45 of 45 posts in this discussion
In reply to an earlier post on Jan 13, 2011, 2:02:47 PM PST
Your book sounds like something my sister would really like. Any prospect for it being published for Kindles?

In reply to an earlier post on Feb 11, 2011, 6:22:19 AM PST
Tero says:
You must mean American writers. I don't read many, as I do not need a brick book to read.

Arnaldur Indridason is pretty good if you do not mind gloomy.

Silence of the Grave (Reykjavik Murder Mysteries, No. 2)

In reply to an earlier post on Feb 11, 2011, 7:03:18 AM PST
Mar Preston says:
No Dice (Volume 1)

Elizabeth George's new one, can't remember the name, is certainly an example of the door stopper--almost 700 pages.
However, I did finish it so it was worth the read. I like those gloomy Scandahoovians.

In reply to an earlier post on Feb 11, 2011, 7:52:30 AM PST
Tero says:
will check it out

Posted on Mar 23, 2011, 12:21:45 PM PDT
Mark Porter says:
I like the Wallander mysteries, Henning Mankell.

In reply to an earlier post on Mar 23, 2011, 5:43:53 PM PDT
H'mmm, this is an interesting discussion. I've always had a problem of writing too short. When I'm done, I'm done. However, I do like to make sure I have three dimensional characters who have real lives. In my Rocky Bluff P.D. books, Angel Lost, is the latest, there is as much about what's going in the officers' private lives as when they are working, but one really does affect the other.

In reply to an earlier post on Mar 25, 2011, 10:58:03 AM PDT
Eric Keith says:
I agree with you, William. That's why I modeled my novel, Nine Man's Murder, after Agatha Christie. Christie was part of the Golden Age of mystery writing, where the chief emphasis was on the mystery as a puzzle, a kind of challenge between the author (murderer) and the reader, who tried to figure out the murderer's identity while the author tried to stump him. It was a game readers loved losing. But more important, the reader was INVOLVED in the story, an active participant. My novel is only the first in a series of mystery novels intended to mark a return to the Golden Age mystery novel and the supremacy of plot, plot twists, and surprises.

Eric Keith

In reply to an earlier post on Mar 25, 2011, 1:28:51 PM PDT
thanks for your input - I just ordered your book from amazon and look forward to reading it -- !

Posted on Mar 25, 2011, 4:47:23 PM PDT
Whs McIntyre says:
I can't be bothered with long drawn out mystery stories either. For a fast-paced read where I guarantee you'll not guess the ending try Relatively Guilty (Robbie Munro - best defence series). wm

Posted on Apr 8, 2011, 9:15:09 AM PDT
Mark Porter says:
Hey, mine's 262 pages and I reckon it's funny, too.

HOWEVER - Joe R. Lansdale is the master. Read 'Leather Maiden' for a straight up and down mystery.

In reply to an earlier post on Apr 8, 2011, 5:12:05 PM PDT
Mar Preston says:
No Dice (Volume 1)

Notice you keep seeing the same authors blurbing all the time. They're called Blurb Whores. Wonder why?

I am so cynical. Kick me.

In reply to an earlier post on Sep 26, 2011, 12:48:10 PM PDT
Gwen Bohlen says:
You are absolutely correct. Are all readers only interested in rogue characters, hard core thrillers that have out of sight language and detailed sex?

In reply to an earlier post on Sep 27, 2011, 10:09:42 AM PDT
Mar Preston says:
I write police procedurals and have felt the push to think up some new way to inflict mayhem and suffering. I've put down serial killer books because I simply don't want to put new poictures in my head--like the horror movie you saw as a teenager and still remember.

I'm convinced there's a readership that gets more and more careful about what we allow in.

Posted on Sep 27, 2011, 1:51:47 PM PDT
Gwen Bohlen says:
I agree with you. It is still possible to write a good mystery novel without terror. wenlen

In reply to an earlier post on Sep 27, 2011, 2:45:32 PM PDT
Mar Preston says:
No Dice (Volume 1)My idea of terror is turning the page real fast to find out what happened next. And I really don't like cozies. That's way too mild.

Who's someone in the middle?

In reply to an earlier post on Oct 1, 2011, 10:30:58 AM PDT
Gwen Bohlen says:
That's too bad. Your name calling is terrible.

In reply to an earlier post on Oct 1, 2011, 12:20:57 PM PDT
Mar Preston says:
No Dice (Volume 1)Gwen, I'm mystified. My name calling? Are you referring to me or something else?

In reply to an earlier post on Oct 3, 2011, 10:29:56 AM PDT
Gwen Bohlen says:
Gwen Bohlen says: I was referring to your post previously. "...you keep seeing the same authors blurbing all the time. They're called Blurb Wh..." Since, I try to be involved in CS community, I took it to be me that you were referring to. My Welsh mystery stories are not selling. Maybe, I am being overly sensitive. Both my books are now on Kindle for $0.99 and maybe sales will pickup.

In reply to an earlier post on Oct 3, 2011, 1:04:22 PM PDT
Mar Preston says:
No Dice (Volume 1) Good Lord, I hardly meant you, Gwen. You look on the back of best sellers and it's the same people again and again touting their friends. Or writers published by the same house.

I apologize deeply for causing you any distress.

In reply to an earlier post on Oct 3, 2011, 1:36:41 PM PDT
Gwen Bohlen says:
Thanks for your response. I guess I jumped the gun. Sorry. Gwen
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Discussion in:  Murder Mystery forum
Participants:  21
Total posts:  45
Initial post:  Jul 13, 2010
Latest post:  Oct 3, 2011

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