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Nature Lovers


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Showing 26-50 of 1000 posts in this discussion
In reply to an earlier post on Sep 22, 2007 4:39:05 PM PDT
Thank you, book factory! There's nothing like the feeling of soft muck on your feet! :)

In reply to an earlier post on Sep 22, 2007 5:00:08 PM PDT
"what place does Nature's beauty (I don't know if I should use a capital "N" or a little "n" here) have within your belief (or non-belief?) system?"

Nature beauty is sacred to me. For me, there is no need for churches or houses of worship because nature is my sacred space. Nature's beauty is a great teacher. It teaches the balance of giving and receiving, and that life is not always fair.

In reply to an earlier post on Sep 22, 2007 6:20:11 PM PDT
Hi MOOdoo!

What a great response! Thank you! Nature is a teacher, isn't it? Nature teaches us about balance, about the power of patience and the joy of spontaniety, too.

(Right now the leaves are beginning to change where I live - everything's tinged with gold and the air has that crispy apple smell to it. It's just invigorating, you know?)

In reply to an earlier post on Sep 22, 2007 7:38:44 PM PDT
Karen, Dmn girl, you can write! Your words are as beautiful as the scenes they capture. Thanks!

Stars glittering silver above, then as we begin climbing, the sun begins to rise - orangey-pink sky in front of us, stars still twinkling above. Hushed - just the sound of boots scraping against the ice and scree. Peaceful.

Bats are replaced by birds. A hummingbird sits on a branch and watches me water the garden. All of Nature's characters begin to prepare for the new day - like they're actors in a play. Quick! Put the props in place! Hurry - the sun's about to enter the stage - everyone in their places! Thrilling!

At dusk, a misty field somewhere in The Netherlands - a herd of white horses running, sort of glowing through the mist and the coming darkness.

Camping out. Everyone else is asleep, but I'm watching the stars through the tent flap. Suddenly this HUGE falling star streaks across the sky. Just for me. :)

Hiking last weekend. Came out on this ridge covered with wildflowers. Little purple butterflies flitting around from lupine to lupine. Sagey ozone smell of higher elevations. Mount Baker to the right and Mount Shuksin to the left - covered in glaciers and craggly rock. Another world.

Standing on the beach, looking out across the Pacific. Trying to imagine China on the other side. The hugeness, the constancy and rhythmn of the waves, the seagulls calling above, agates at my feet. Nutrient-rich smell of the saltwater. Beauty everywhere.

In reply to an earlier post on Sep 22, 2007 8:59:26 PM PDT
MOOdoo -

Nicely said! I've missed you!

MOOOOOOOOOOOO!

In reply to an earlier post on Sep 23, 2007 7:09:51 AM PDT
Wow! Thank YOU, John! You made my day!

In reply to an earlier post on Sep 23, 2007 7:28:00 AM PDT
Bryan Borich says:
The Soul of an Indian by George Eastman, when I was lead from the first religion to the last, this one was the one I identified with the most, other than that Bahai also has it's place in my heart.

A copy of said book can be found at project guttenberg.

In reply to an earlier post on Sep 23, 2007 7:41:29 AM PDT
MOOnSong! I've missed you! MOOOOOO!

In reply to an earlier post on Sep 23, 2007 7:47:25 AM PDT
Last edited by the author on Sep 23, 2007 8:08:07 AM PDT
J. May says:
Hi again Karen :) Thank you for sharing the words of Mary Baker Eddy with me. Interesting and so beautifully put.

Your post made me want to come along with you on your travels. Actually, you made me feel like I was "there" with you. It was really well written and I enjoyed reading it. It was poetic and down to earth at the same time. Good Stuff, thank you for sharing it :)

Edit:Sorry for the 2 deletions below.This post posted Three Times. I have no idea why.... Yet another Computer Mystery ;-)

In reply to an earlier post on Sep 23, 2007 7:47:37 AM PDT
[Deleted by the author on Sep 23, 2007 7:49:21 AM PDT]

In reply to an earlier post on Sep 23, 2007 7:47:39 AM PDT
[Deleted by the author on Sep 23, 2007 7:48:48 AM PDT]

In reply to an earlier post on Sep 23, 2007 9:40:47 AM PDT
Runny Babbit says:
Karen- I have to say this has become my favorite post in the religion group. I have read so many responses here, from all different sorts of believers and non-believers filled with the kind of beauty that we Nature lovers love!

Thank you

In reply to an earlier post on Sep 23, 2007 12:28:52 PM PDT
Hi David!

Thank you! I'm really enjoying this thread, too! (And thank you for getting the thread rolling with your first thoughtful post!)

So what's Nature up to right now in your neck of the woods? Are the leaves turning color? Is there a nip in the air, yet?

In reply to an earlier post on Sep 23, 2007 12:52:31 PM PDT
Runny Babbit says:
Karen-

I live in Michigan and we are enjoying very pleasant days in the 70s and low 80s. Some leaves are starting to turn. The poison ivy and virginia creeper are turning brilliant red. Even these toxic and annoying plants are beautiful. remember: look, don't touch!

The woods are producing a bounty of edibles: puffball mushrooms, sulphur shelf fungus, hickory nuts, hazelnuts, apples, etc...

The monarchs are finishing up and getting ready for the long trek to Mexico. We raised and released a couple dozen of them with the local elementary school. We like to share our love of Nature, as well.

The birds, squirrels, and chipmunks are getting fat. I think the hummingbirds have started South. I haven't seen any in the last week.

The acorns are falling fast and furious this year. It sounds like rain out in the oak woods some days. Really heavy rain.

In reply to an earlier post on Sep 23, 2007 12:57:30 PM PDT
Runny Babbit says:
book factory:
I agree with David Allen, that it is pleasing biologically because of symmetry. As a Christian I have no problem with that and am unsure why he made that comment.

DLA: Hi Book factory. I realize that anyone can appreciate the beauty of natural geometry. I was not excluding Christians in this. My statement was in reference to my comment that this beauty proves to ME that a designer is not necessary. Some friends of mine would say the opposite. That this beauty proves the existence of a designer.

In reply to an earlier post on Sep 23, 2007 1:20:26 PM PDT
Runny Babbit says:
RE: the brutality of Nature.
This has been a subject of meditation for me for a long time.

My children have asked me about the nature of good and bad. Is a tiger bad? Is a bunny good? They see pictures of tigers killing and they see pictures of tigers lovingly caring for their young.

I tell them:
Think of the forest (we live in the middle of a forest). It is beautiful, it gives us food and shelter. It gives us joy when we walk through it. It provides homes for many living things. Even as its trees die, they provide homes and food for other animals and plants: woodpeckers and mushrooms, insects and worms. Is it good?

But if we are careless, or if a tree falls on you, you may be in serious trouble. It may even kill you. In an instant, a storm can turn the forest into a deadly place to be. Is it bad?

The forest is neither good nor bad. It is just the forest. If we respect the forest, we have nothing to be afraid of.

Likewise a tiger is just a tiger. It is beautiful and dangerous, loving and deadly. Worthy of respect, as well.

Fortunately, we don't have tigers in Michigan. As much as I love to look at them, I don't want them eating my children.

In reply to an earlier post on Sep 23, 2007 1:27:27 PM PDT
book factory says:
David,
That was lovely! Begs the question, for me at least, does nature love us back, as we love it? Nature isn't the animal or the mountain is it? What exactly IS nature?

In reply to an earlier post on Sep 23, 2007 3:23:28 PM PDT
David,

Wow! Your Michigan woods sound wonderful! Great description! That's so cool that the kids in your local school get to be there at the beginning of the monarchs' lives! (I've been a middle school teacher for the last 15 years, but I moved down to fifth grade this year and it's been really fun to experience the wonder of being a ten year-old again!)

I live in Washington State - five minutes from the Puget Sound and an hour from the Cascade Mountains. Up until a week ago it still felt summery here - but in the last week the trees have been starting to turn gold and the air has gotten a little crisper. And I find myself thick in blackberry pie-making mode - I'm sure Darwin could explain this - some gathering instinct in me comes out in the autumn and no blackberry is safe. (Do you have blackberries in Michigan?)

In reply to an earlier post on Sep 23, 2007 3:28:12 PM PDT
David,

I love how you explain the danger and beauty of Nature to your kids: "Think of the forest ... It is beautiful, it gives us food and shelter. It gives us joy when we walk through it. It provides homes for many living things. Even as its trees die, they provide homes and food for other animals and plants: woodpeckers and mushrooms, insects and worms. Is it good?

"But if we are careless, or if a tree falls on you, you may be in serious trouble. It may even kill you. In an instant, a storm can turn the forest into a deadly place to be. Is it bad?

"The forest is neither good nor bad. It is just the forest. If we respect the forest, we have nothing to be afraid of.

"Likewise a tiger is just a tiger. It is beautiful and dangerous, loving and deadly. Worthy of respect, as well."

Great closing line, too. :)

In reply to an earlier post on Sep 24, 2007 8:33:03 AM PDT
Runny Babbit says:
Karen- I want to share something with you. I have been telling my children this story about nature, bad, and good for 6 or 7 years. One wonders if one is getting through. Yesterday morning, my 10 year old woke up and her eyes popped open. She said, "Daddy, Daddy, I want to tell you something!"

I said, "Yes, Becca?"

Becca replied, "No animal is bad. Not even this mosquito. It just wants to feed its babies. No animal is bad. It's just an animal."

Karen, it was one of the proudest moments of my life. True compassion.

In reply to an earlier post on Sep 24, 2007 8:35:54 AM PDT
David L. Allen,

That's awesome!

In reply to an earlier post on Sep 24, 2007 8:55:32 AM PDT
Runny Babbit says:
book factory- Begs the question, for me at least, does nature love us back, as we love it? Nature isn't the animal or the mountain is it? What exactly IS nature?:

DLA: That's a very good question.
I view emotions as a construct of our mind. I cherish them nonetheless. Can Nature experience an emotion? Not in any way that we might consider. But is love simply an emotion? Could we define love as a connection that is extra-personal. That is, is it a connection that is somehow outside ourselves, that transcends self. For example, I would not quantify my love for my children as simply "I love them and they love me." Rather, there is an apparent attachment that is independent of my sense of self. I can never stop loving my child. Even after one of us dies, the love will still remain.

I view Nature as all-encompassing. The tiger, the forest, myself, the air, my child, the stuff of stars. All are made of the same stuff. But we are not simply discrete entities all made of atoms, particles, and quanta. We ARE the same stuff in different form. Just as my liver can not go parading around and proclaiming, "I am the Liver, you must do as I say or I shall smite you," I am an integral part of the whole. When I die, I do not simply cease to exist. Instead, Nature changes form subtly.

So, my friend, there is an extra-self connection between the tiger and I, between the forest and I, between Nature and I. This connection can not be broken. Even the Laws of Thermodynamics agree, as matter and energy can neither be created nor destroyed. This is more profound to me than the idea that we are bodiless souls floating around in heaven. We are not separate from Nature. We ARE Nature.

Does Nature love me? Yes, I think Nature does.

In reply to an earlier post on Sep 24, 2007 9:04:40 AM PDT
Curt Fox says:
Thanks Karen. I've not always been able to maintain that balance personally, but it's never been for want of effort. It's about open minds, open eyes, and open arms. Understand that yu don't have all the answers, be willing to actually see the answers when they present themselves, and accept truth once it's been established. But not before.

In reply to an earlier post on Sep 24, 2007 10:13:57 AM PDT
David, you and I think exactly alike when it comes to the topic of our definition of nature.

"So, my friend, there is an extra-self connection between the tiger and I, between the forest and I, between Nature and I. This connection can not be broken. Even the Laws of Thermodynamics agree, as matter and energy can neither be created nor destroyed. This is more profound to me than the idea that we are bodiless souls floating around in heaven. We are not separate from Nature. We ARE Nature."

That's beautiful. I got all choked up reading that because I've never heard another person put my thoughts into words the way you did.

In reply to an earlier post on Sep 24, 2007 2:22:12 PM PDT
Last edited by the author on Sep 24, 2007 2:23:13 PM PDT
J. May says:
This has been one of the more fun and unifiying threads so far, and it just keeps getting better :). Hope more people share on this.
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Discussion in:  Religion forum
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Initial post:  Sep 21, 2007
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