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Texas GOP Makes Opposition to "Critical Thinking Skills" Official Policy


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Showing 1076-1100 of 1000 posts in this discussion
Posted on Jul 14, 2012, 3:04:09 AM PDT
'probabilist says:
http://news.nationalpost.com/2012/06/25/war-of-1812-a-fight-to-maintain-a-different-way-of-life/

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 14, 2012, 3:05:29 AM PDT
'probabilist says:
Hi, SK -

I think you've understood my point. No need for me to belabor it.

,.-)

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 14, 2012, 3:06:14 AM PDT
'probabilist says:
RRR wrote:

> The only way anyone could reach that conclusion
> is if they have a not-so-hidden agenda
> or if they have suffered a traumatic head injury.

Interesting statement.

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 14, 2012, 6:44:08 AM PDT
Got it in one! Nicely done.

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 14, 2012, 8:46:01 AM PDT
S. Kessler says:
Frankly, I'm not at all sure what your point was.

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 14, 2012, 9:51:43 AM PDT
'probabilist says:
[Customers don't think this post adds to the discussion. Show post anyway. Show all unhelpful posts.]

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 14, 2012, 12:59:46 PM PDT
S. Kessler says:
Oy. I never did enjoy riddles.

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 14, 2012, 5:48:09 PM PDT
'probabilist says:
,.-)

Posted on Jul 15, 2012, 12:34:03 PM PDT
'probabilist says:
'Liberalism has always had two faces. From one side, toleration is the pursuit of an ideal form of life. From the other, it is the search for terms of peace among different ways of life. In the former view, liberal institutions are seen as applications of universal principles. In the latter, they are a means to peaceful coexistence. In the first, liberalism is a prescription for a univeral regime. In the second, it is a project of coexistence that can be pursued in many regimes.'

- John Gray, in his book
Two Faces of Liberalism
(Blackwell, 2000), p. 2

Posted on Jul 15, 2012, 1:11:25 PM PDT
'probabilist says:
'If liberalism has a future, it is in giving up the search for a rational consensus on the best way of life. As a consequence of mass migration, new technologies of communication and continued cultural experimentation, nearly all societies today contain several ways of life, with many people belonging to more than one. The liberal ideal of toleration which looks to a rational consensus on the best way of life was born in societies divided on the claims of a single way of life. It cannot show us how to live together in societies that harbour many ways of life.'

- John Gray, in his book
Two Faces of Liberalism
(Blackwell, 2000), pp. 1-2

Posted on Jul 15, 2012, 1:27:07 PM PDT
'probabilist says:
'Rational inquiry in ethics does not yield consensus on the best life. It shows that the good life comes in many varieties. The idea that the exercise of reason produces agreement is at least as old as Plato's Socrates. Even so, there has never been much to support it. Reason can enlighten us as to our ethical conflicts. Often, it shows them to be deeper than we thought, and leaves us in the lurch as to how to resolve them.'

- John Gray, in his book
Two Faces of Liberalism
(Blackwell, 2000), p. 3

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 15, 2012, 1:30:58 PM PDT
I'm with you. This seems uncommonly and unnecessarily cryptic.

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 15, 2012, 8:53:14 PM PDT
S. Kessler says:
Thanks, Rachel, for the confirmation. I was starting to get paranoid.

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 15, 2012, 10:09:27 PM PDT
No need for that! I've noticed him taking on an increasingly adversarial tone since his return. He hit me with a series of "challenging" questions, the same as you and the conclusion was equally obscure. Tonight on my other thread about losing faith, he mentioned that he thought my tone was "strident." I suppose I could take solace in the fact that he didn't say I was "shrill." But he ignored the many pages where I was not just challenged, but attacked with verbal abuse for my simple story of how I came to lose my faith.

It's interesting that we have all kinds of stories of believers witnessing for the Lord, but few relating how unbelievers who previously believed came to lose that belief. Who is to say who is right and wrong? As it turns out, quite a few were more than ready to tell me and a few others just how wrong we are. If I have any "tone," it is in response to those baseless attacks. If someone believes in God and came to that through an epiphany, I won't challenge that unless someone tells me that their personal experience is a fact. I related my experience. I made no pronouncements about Christians, but that didn't stop a number of theists from taking offense at my story, strangely enough.

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 15, 2012, 10:35:00 PM PDT
'probabilist says:
Did I take offense at your story?

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 15, 2012, 10:43:40 PM PDT
No, that wasn't the point. I shared something very personal to me and the unwarranted attacks were hurtful. There is always that risk when sharing in a public format, I know, but many of these comments were beyond the pale. When looking at a single perceived aspect of me, you might have thought to have looked at the big picture. There are many people who may make uncharacteristic outbursts. I'll give them a free pass if I see that a particular comment is out of character for someone. In other words, some people have earned the benefit of the doubt.

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 15, 2012, 10:48:20 PM PDT
'probabilist says:
OK.

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 15, 2012, 11:40:25 PM PDT
Eric Pyle says:
RRR,

Maybe you saw, I started a thread about religious art and us atheists.

I'm guessing, based on your posts here, that you are probably uninterested or unmoved by the religious content of works of art. But if that's really you with the viola da gamba, you're no doubt very sensitive to the formal qualities of works which were made originally as religious.

Anyway, if you're into that kind of thing, I'd be interested in your input on that thread.

(My ulterior motive in starting that conversation was to get past the standard debate on this forum, which I'm tired of. I'll let others fight the good fight for a removal of the bad influences of religion in the public sphere. Religion as aesthetic content is worth a ponder, though.)

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 16, 2012, 10:36:48 AM PDT
Hi Eric! I didn't see that thread. I'm not a big expert on art. Music is more up my alley, as it were. I'll take a look at it and contribute if I can.

Yes, that really is me with the vdg, in all of my terrified glory!

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 16, 2012, 10:45:41 AM PDT
S. Kessler says:
I know, Rebecca, I have been reading that thread daily if not posting for a while. But I perceive just what you do, too. So there you have it! Keep up the good work, Sista!

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 16, 2012, 11:14:50 AM PDT
Thanks, sweetie! I hope at some point you'll feel comfortable sharing your story of how you came to your unbelief on that thread too. No pressure, though!

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 16, 2012, 11:58:03 AM PDT
S. Kessler says:
I've actually written several long posts over the years about why I never had any belief in the supernatural and why learning of my mother's and the rest of my family's experiences in the Holocaust served to cement my already obvious lack of belief in a god. These posts are scattered around different threads both here and in the Christianity Forum. But if you like, I will recompose my story for your thread.

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 16, 2012, 12:28:19 PM PDT
That would be nice, thank you. I'm also interested in hearing Lace's story too. You two are two of my favorite posters. I look forward to each post!

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 16, 2012, 9:40:55 PM PDT
'probabilist says:
> (Religion as aesthetic content is worth a ponder, though.)

Aye.

Posted on Jul 16, 2012, 9:46:37 PM PDT
'probabilist says:
Good book, from what I've read in it here on Amazon:

Paleoclimates: Understanding Climate Change Past and Present
by Thomas M. Cronin
(Columbia University Press, 2009)
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Initial post:  Jul 1, 2012
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