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Finally evidence for Nibiru, this should quell the crazy talk


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Showing 1-25 of 103 posts in this discussion
In reply to an earlier post on Dec 2, 2012, 4:02:54 PM PST
Customer says:
the Lagrangian point would be between the Great Attractor, a supercluster and a galaxy. There's a lot of them out there.

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 2, 2012, 4:00:43 PM PST
Customer says:
they live in space because their home sun has gotten too warm due to running out of hydrogen. But they explore endlessly for an Earth-like planet.

You agree that an Earth-like planet is almost as rare as one in a trillion? 'Not good chances for them to find another one in this galaxy, unless they detect our O2 signature.

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 2, 2012, 3:33:16 PM PST
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In reply to an earlier post on Dec 2, 2012, 3:25:34 PM PST
Last edited by the author on Dec 2, 2012, 3:27:42 PM PST
Hewie: "The only way to colonize galaxies is being institutionalized in mental asylum."

Didn't your momma ever teach you to play nice? There you go again. Somehow I can imagine you going all "Sharia Law" on the other kids in the neighborhood if you lost at tiddleywinks.

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 2, 2012, 3:19:56 PM PST
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In reply to an earlier post on Dec 2, 2012, 3:14:02 PM PST
Re werranth413, 12-2 10:22 AM: "the Lagrange points..." Lagrangian points exist in a system with two large bodies in which a third (small) body can be positioned without influence from external forces. I don't see the concept of Lagranian points being applicable in a galaxy.

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 2, 2012, 3:09:16 PM PST
Re werranth413, 12-2 6:29 AM: " our planet's potential has been recorded and shared..." And your evidence for this is ...?

"the Galaxy could be explored in only a few million years..." This may be true -- but can you seriously suppose the existence of some exploration which would take "a few million years" to complete?

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 2, 2012, 2:48:46 PM PST
Last edited by the author on Dec 2, 2012, 2:49:51 PM PST
So.....I guess I might still get my hands chopped off?

You seemed to be saying that you could not colonize a galaxy in a certain amount of time because the measuring of time would be different in different locations. I can't imagine what else you might have been trying to say. What I was saying was....the only way it would matter for a time estimate to colonize a galaxy would be in the communications to verify that is was being colonized. These would be independent "colonies" though because of distance.

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 2, 2012, 1:44:44 PM PST
Phineas J. Magoo, Esquire wrote:
"It might be difficult to verify because of eventually huge communication time lags across a galaxy but you can always make an estimate and base it on Earth time."
=================
There is no communication time between galaxies because there are no business people to communicate stuff.

You have nothing to estimate, and if you do, you have nothing to gain, nothing to verify against.

Mohamed F. El-Hewie

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 2, 2012, 11:46:29 AM PST
Last edited by the author on Dec 2, 2012, 11:49:13 AM PST
Hewie: "Hence, your instincts conflicts with your tainted education."

That's nice.....now it's a "tainted" education. Werranth was saying something about how long it might take to colonize a galaxy. That can be based on Earth time or whatever time standard you want. Otherwise you couldn't talk about any estimate of time at all. It might be difficult to verify because of eventually huge communication time lags across a galaxy but you can always make an estimate and base it on Earth time.

Hewie, if you were British, you might be called "eccentric". So much of what you say is "out there". I don't get my hands chopped off for typing that do I? Just checking.

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 2, 2012, 11:38:07 AM PST
Last edited by the author on Dec 2, 2012, 11:39:15 AM PST
You cannot measure miles and hours in celestial universe because both distance and time are fixed in your frame of reference.

A mile and a second for you have no reciprocal in other remote frames where you and me never been there before.

Whatever speed, distance, and time you allege in your frame of reference are mere illusions of your own perceptions.

If energy follows different laws in the remote universe, you are left with daydreaming, detached from the realities of universe totally alien to our perceptions.

But, you already assaulted the popular claim that time was relative when all thinkers, from the beginning of human history believe that time is absolute.

Hence, your instincts conflict with your tainted education.

Mohamed F. El-Hewie

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 2, 2012, 10:22:09 AM PST
Last edited by the author on Dec 2, 2012, 10:28:17 AM PST
Customer says:
why is time relative? Because it's not a separate 'dimension'? There's more than one part to it, but humans need to sense it as separate for survival purposes?

When did organisms make that advance and acquire that capability to sense time as a separate way of measuring, separate from distance/gravitational curvature/spacetime?

When two objects aren't moving and aren't in a strong gravitational field how small can their relativistic displacements get? All objects are moving toward the GA at 1.6 million miles every hour, but what of the objects in the Lagrange points between the GA and large superclusters? Maybe the gravitational forces and their relativistic effects cancel out 'way out there?

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 2, 2012, 10:03:47 AM PST
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In reply to an earlier post on Dec 2, 2012, 9:41:49 AM PST
Bubba says:
Thanks for pointing out my typo, I know better.

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 2, 2012, 8:12:35 AM PST
M. Helsdon says:
"I've read that the Galaxy could be explored in only a few million years with a sufficient number of multigenerational fleets, which seemed surprising to me."

About twenty to fifty million years. It suggests that:
a) Intelligence is rare, and technological civilizations are even more rare and few if any achieve sufficient longevity to engage in interstellar travel, or at some point their technology leads them in other directions.
b) Technological intelligence is so rare that it has a low probability of arising in any one galaxy, and the Milky Way has never had any survive/rise to interstellar levels. Andromeda might be populated by an interstellar civilization, but until Andromeda and the Milky Way get closer in a few billion years, intergalactic distances are too great to travel - and when the two do get close enough to interact, conditions in both galaxies are going to be potentially hazardous...

"If such a short time is involved and the incentives are in place, then such a fleet has been nearby, but maybe not during the recent reign of humans."

If such a fleet had been nearby in recent geological history, and had an interest in this sort of world, we wouldn't be here.

"Maybe it was a billion years ago, but our our planet's potential has been recorded and shared among the advanced tech/civs out there."

A billion years ago, and several billion years ago, any civilization capable of interstellar flight would have had the capability to bioform Earth to their liking, to the extent of re-engineering the enviroment including modifying the atmosphere.

"Are they preoccupied on the other side of the Galaxy 50,000 LYs away?"

Unless they have recently gained the capability, they, or their probes should have been here long ago.

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 2, 2012, 6:29:49 AM PST
Last edited by the author on Dec 2, 2012, 6:37:11 AM PST
Customer says:
c) Stars are separated by great distances, and it is unlikely that the nearest complex (and intelligent) life is anywhere nearby.

I've read that the Galaxy could be explored in only a few million years with a sufficient number of multigenerational fleets, which seemed surprising to me. If such a short time is involved and the incentives are in place, then such a fleet has been nearby, but maybe not during the recent reign of humans. Maybe it was a billion years ago, but our our planet's potential has been recorded and shared among the advanced tech/civs out there. Are they preoccupied on the other side of the Galaxy 50,000 LYs away?
I have a map of where Voyager was flung over there (Delta Quadrant) if anyone wants a copy.

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 1, 2012, 9:50:58 PM PST
Re Bubba, 12-1 10:16 AM: Flaw in this: every fourth year has a Feb. 29th. (I had a great aunt who was born on Feb. 29.)

Gilbert and Sullivan's "Pirates of Penzance" revolves around this idea, but they took liberties with it: the story is set in the summer, even though it is supposed to have occurred on the protagonist's birthday -- which would have had to have been Feb. 29, 1856.

Posted on Dec 1, 2012, 10:41:46 AM PST
Last edited by the author on Dec 1, 2012, 10:43:06 AM PST
Angel says:
Mohamed F. El-Hewie says:

Your only remaining avenue is imagination.
And laser is your sole hope for channeling information to any planet beyond the solar system.

***At the expense of being arrested.

Pointing a laser toward a plane is now a felony. Pilots and crew members have been temporarily blinded. See FBI article.

FBI - Illegal Use of Laser Pointers a Serious Crime
http://www.fbi.gov/news/stories/2011/september/laser_092611/laser_092611

Best,

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 1, 2012, 10:16:55 AM PST
Last edited by the author on Dec 2, 2012, 9:43:05 AM PST
Bubba says:
There are approximately 365.24 days in a year, which is why every 4th year has a Feb 29th.

Correct Feb 28th to Feb 29th, Thanks to Robert A. Saunders for pointing out my typo.

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 1, 2012, 8:21:00 AM PST
Last edited by the author on Dec 1, 2012, 11:18:48 AM PST
M. Helsdon says:
"900 mil from now the Earth will STILL be a nicer place than Mars or Europa?"

Yes, though probably by 800 million years all land animals will have gone, and long before that the numbers of animals will decrease drastically.

"If this happens all the time around stars, why aren't all those refugees coming to take over our jewel of a planet?"

a) Complex multicellular life may be rare in the universe, it's been relatively rare during the history of life on Earth.

b) Life on Earth has evolved to live on Earth; alien life will have evolved to potentially very different conditions, and might not even share a basic biochemistry with terrestrial life.

c) Stars are separated by great distances, and it is unlikely that the nearest complex (and intelligent) life is anywhere nearby.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 30, 2012, 9:55:38 PM PST
Re werranth413, above: Distance is more than an "inconvenience." Even if a vessel is powered by a nuclear fusion reactor [1], it will not be able to do a one-way trip at more than 0.2 c. (Run the numbers for "specific impulse" to see this.) So, a trip to Proxima Centauri would take decades.

For an interesting take on this idea, grab a copy of Heinlein's novelette "Universe".

1. Scientists have been trying for half a century to build one of these, and have yet to come close. I did a breadboard design for a spacecraft using one; the power involved was over a terawatt -- more than the entire electric generating capacity of the United States. (The design called for a power plant weighing no more than ten tons, with a gross vehicle weight of 100 tons.)

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 30, 2012, 5:02:10 PM PST
Customer says:
huge populations will explore among systems for planets with an O2 signature in multigenerational ships. Distances might only be an inconvenience.

Hopefully, these armadas are far away on the other spiral arms and they won't see our planet until we can defend ourselves.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 30, 2012, 2:46:54 PM PST
Re werranth413, above: You are vastly underestimating the difficulties of interstellar travel -- particularly the time element.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 30, 2012, 11:53:33 AM PST
Customer says:
900 mil from now the Earth will STILL be a nicer place than Mars or Europa?

If this happens all the time around stars, why aren't all those refugees coming to take over our jewel of a planet?

They might show up tomorrow?, live for today!?

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 29, 2012, 11:54:30 AM PST
M. Helsdon says:
Maybe 900 million years for C4 photosynthesis (a billion years at a stretch), and some algae that perform photosynthesis a lot longer, but multicellular life on the surface will die out long before the last plants go. By the time C3 photosynthesis fails, the Earth would have ceased to be very familiar: hotter, drier, tending towards a desert world.
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Discussion in:  Science forum
Participants:  16
Total posts:  103
Initial post:  Nov 18, 2012
Latest post:  Dec 2, 2012

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