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Customer Discussions > Video Games forum

OT: Walmart Black Friday Strike?


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Showing 126-150 of 201 posts in this discussion
In reply to an earlier post on Nov 20, 2012, 8:30:30 AM PST
Haha....Exactly.

It's your English teachers fault that she never taught you proper grammar/punctuation.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 20, 2012, 8:30:48 AM PST
Oskar2525 says:
Its sad to see you have fallen into this trap. Have you felt sorry for movie theater employees for the last 50 years? What about doctors and nurses? Or anyone that has had to work the entire day of Thanksgiving or any holiday for that matter.
It is simply insane that people just now are starting to "care."
I would argue you love the idea of loving people more than you love people.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 20, 2012, 8:31:17 AM PST
MrFoxhound says:
But is Amazon having people work on Thanksgiving? If anything it'll just be the Indian call center, if they even do that much.

I'm pretty sure that lots of people can accurately presume the intentions of a corporation.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 20, 2012, 8:32:11 AM PST
""Companies don't act altruistically for the good of the consumer."

There you go making presumptions again. It's never wise to presume the intentions of anybody - whether it be a company or a person - which is why I said this."

This is absolutely correct though. Corporations have to work for their shareholders. It would be against the welfare of the company and really not acceptable to do anything differently. For profit corporations by definition do not do anything that will not lead to more profits.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 20, 2012, 8:33:23 AM PST
Rockhardly says:
Thinking about it a little bit more:

While the corporate executives for WalMart - and board members - are all at home enjoying the holiday with their families, they are forcing their employees to be at work.

They get all their bonuses, "atta-boys" for hitting targets, etc. - and, if they are like most companies, they just give their employees a 10% discount coupon or maybe a $20 gift card at the same store they work.

So - how about this:

Since the excutives reap 99% of the rewards for Black Friday, how about they let the hourly employees stay home with their families, and the CEO, board members, etc. man the stations at WalMart in order to get their bonuses? They can decline, but in doing so they also lose their bonuses.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 20, 2012, 8:33:37 AM PST
They will when, and if, the economy ever recovers sufficiently that people can find good jobs elsewhere.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 20, 2012, 8:33:40 AM PST
Soulshine says:
You forgot an apostrophe.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 20, 2012, 8:34:24 AM PST
I do feel sorry for movie theater employees. Doctors and nurses are well compensated for this time, and are necessary and I still feel sorry for them. I think we should shut the whole damn country down every Sunday much less on Thanksgiving. Family time and time for yourself should be something we should be able to have in a country that is as great as America is supposed to be.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 20, 2012, 8:35:01 AM PST
Jacob Dyer says:
I don't get the "they decided to work at Walmart" excuse.

Like they had a lot of other options? If you end up working for a bad company, you deserve whatever abuse they dish out, then.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 20, 2012, 8:35:25 AM PST
Facts?! Facts?! These have no place in an internet discussion, or in political campaigns!

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 20, 2012, 8:35:31 AM PST
Oskar2525 says:
Same thing has been happening with movie theaters, hospitals, etc. for years and years. Why are you making a big deal of it now?

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 20, 2012, 8:37:07 AM PST
Soulshine says:
Possibly because it never happened at Walmart until now.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 20, 2012, 8:39:16 AM PST
Last edited by the author on Nov 20, 2012, 8:49:08 AM PST
Let's go through this objectively -

"We always get off on Thanksgiving."

This is an observation made by the employee, it is NOT a guarantee given beforehand by the employer.

"I'm looking forward to a little time off and spending a day with family."

Every person in all professions (doctors, police officers, nurses, movie theater employees) enjoys time off with their family.

"Maybe I even made travel arrangements, and that's a big deal because I don't have a lot of money."

Although I sympathize with a lack of available funding, the ultimate choice to receive little pay for work is that of the employees. Having to change travel plans is an inconvenience, but this is nothing to demonize a company over. Around three months ago I was required to work on both of my days off with only two days notice. I had a friend coming in from out of town which bummed me out a bit, but my company needed me there so I shrugged it off, worked both days, and enjoyed the overtime thereafter.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 20, 2012, 8:41:16 AM PST
Soulshine says:
If it was a logic argument, there would be no argument.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 20, 2012, 8:41:57 AM PST
Last edited by the author on Nov 20, 2012, 8:44:01 AM PST
...Can you explain why ANY argument should be void from logical analysis?

You can't just cast logic aside willy-nilly and expect that to help your point....That approach actually cripples your point, severely.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 20, 2012, 8:44:42 AM PST
Soulshine says:
Logically, there should be no holidays ever. A massive section of society should not choose to eat the same kind of food on the fourth Thursday of November. But they do, so that's our starting point. To take all that out of the equation is logical, but not necessarily reasonable.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 20, 2012, 8:46:01 AM PST
Last edited by the author on Nov 20, 2012, 8:46:33 AM PST
"Logically, there should be no holidays ever"

Present your logic instead of saying "Logically" before making a very boisterous statement.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 20, 2012, 8:55:51 AM PST
Last edited by the author on Nov 20, 2012, 8:56:51 AM PST
Soulshine says:
Let's back up to the holiday in question. What is the point of Thanksgiving? There are religious and cultural roots, sure. But in two days a ton of people are going to do just about the same thing out of a sense of tradition and not much else. There's logic in an employer giving time off, even more logic in matching that up with a national holiday. There's logic in the government establishing this holiday. But the traditions and customs and the date, name, and emotional ties to the holiday aren't really rooted in logic.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 20, 2012, 8:59:57 AM PST
You're missing the point. This is about more than just getting little to no notice about working a mandatory Thanksgiving evening. This is what I hope is the straw that broke the camel's back. You, yourself, admit that Walmart couldn't care less about high turnover. They don't care about their employees in many ways. They treat them like they're disposable. I say, it's about high time Walmart gets it's comeuppance.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 20, 2012, 9:03:24 AM PST
Well, I don't know about comeuppance, but it's well within the employees rights to strike. This seems like as good of a reason as any. That's if you believe both corporations and employees have rights. I'm starting to wonder if that's the case in here.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 20, 2012, 9:03:52 AM PST
You say ask, but that appears not to be the case. I got the impression that it was announced with little notice that it will be mandatory. I don't have all the facts, but if it was my job, and they gave me little notice that I'd have to work any day that I normally would have off, holiday or not, I'd be upset. If it was a pattern of behavior that stretched far back in time, of my employer taking my needs for granted, then I would consider walking out.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 20, 2012, 9:07:38 AM PST
Last edited by the author on Nov 20, 2012, 9:12:30 AM PST
"You say ask, but that appears not to be the case. I got the impression that it was announced with little notice that it will be mandatory. "

You must be deliberately misinterpreting what I am saying now. Wal-Mart has asked that their employees be there on this day. The employers cannot [legally] go to the employees house and drag them out kicking and screaming, they can only assign their schedule and ask that the employees show up.

Nobody is being forced to do anything. Employment is a choice and a privilege, therefore - Yes, they are being asked.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 20, 2012, 9:10:29 AM PST
Last edited by the author on Nov 20, 2012, 9:15:37 AM PST
You are trying to divert attention now to an argument on whether or not logic is applicable in any sense to religion, culture, tradition, etc.

I'm sorry but this abstract tangent you've veered onto is not directly related to what we were speaking about previously. I addressed your previous argument in full with my objective analysis of your hypothetical scenario. Do you have anything to contradict what I said?

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 20, 2012, 9:15:14 AM PST
Soulshine says:
Can you please restate the question for me? I believe the original conversation was that I feel that there is a strong emotional element included in the way this issue was handled, and that is part of the reason for the emotional response from employees. And you feel that it should be a plain case of an employer's right to take away a holiday and the emoployee's refusal to accept this. I think.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 20, 2012, 9:16:19 AM PST
I see nothing wrong with the grammar. The punctuation, though...

So, it's your brother-in-law's fault that donut shop has to be open on Thanksgiving.

It begs the question, which donut shop? But, it's grammatically correct. That's right, I work for the Grammar Gestapo. I'm tired of the Spelling Stasi and the Punctuation Polizei getting all the attention.
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This discussion

Discussion in:  Video Games forum
Participants:  32
Total posts:  201
Initial post:  Nov 19, 2012
Latest post:  Nov 22, 2012

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