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Darkness Visible: A Memoir of Madness
Darkness Visible: A Memoir of Madness
by William Styron
Edition: Hardcover
Price: $12.62
105 used & new from $3.43

4.0 out of 5 stars Loss of Eden, June 10, 2013
Like any good Southern author, Virginia-born William Styron enjoyed his cocktails as he labored over his acclaimed novels, and therefore he was surprised in his early sixties when he suddenly acquired an aversion to alcohol -- "it was as if my system had generated a form of Antabuse". At first it was a pleasant surprise, the author naturally thinking he had progressed to a new level of mental and physical health, the release from demon rum! But it was soon afterwards that he was bothered by an oppressive feeling of uneasiness and malaise. Thus began the major depression which Styron discusses in his 1990 essay "Darkness Visible: a Memoir of Madness". The draining quality of the condition became so overpowering that it finally led to thoughts of suicide, a haunting that Styron describes in detail. At least three of his creations have committed suicide: the confused débutante in "Lie Down in Darkness" and, in "Sophie's Choice", the schizoid intellectual with his lover, an Auschwitz survivor. Following this thought, Styron lists all the famous authors who have taken their own lives, people as diverse as Virginia Woolf and Henri de Montherlant. (The death of the Soviet poet Sergei Yesnin was so bizarre his acquaintances denied it was suicide but rather a "set up" by the government.) I notice there are many one-star reviews in Amazon.com, the book being dismissed as everything from pretentious to inaccurate. Some readers seem to object that a man with fame and fortune should complain of depression, but I think that shows a lack of understanding the disease itself. (I'm reminded of the actor George Sanders who was wealthy, highly respected in his field, and attractive to beautiful women, yet he killed himself. Why? "Because I am bored," his suicide note said, and in this case I think boredom could be construed as depression.) I have never felt the "ravages of melancholia" which Styron describes so well, but I can appreciate his vivid descriptions and sympathize with his dilemma. Incidentally, his title is from Milton, but he compares himself to Dante, finding himself "in a dark wood", and it's a relief to the reader when he comes out from the circles of Hell and "once again beheld the stars".


Wagner: A Biography
Wagner: A Biography
by Curt von Westernhagen
Edition: Paperback
Price: $58.79
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An Immortal at 200, May 22, 2013
This review is from: Wagner: A Biography (Paperback)
For those of us who realize we will probably never conquer Ernest Newman's Everest-like biography of Richard Wagner, there is a worthy alternative in Curt von Westernhagen's "Wagner: A Biography", Mary Whittall's English translation originally published in two volumes in 1978.(This one-volume paperback was first published in 1981.)Though several hundred pages shorter than Newman's epic, von Westernhagen's book is rich in detail and explanation, following the composer's life from his birth in Leipzig on May 22 1813 (Alles Gute zum Geburtstag!) to his death in Venice 70 years later. Composed of seven major parts, this biography not only concentrates on Wagner's personal life but his professional accomplishments as well, so that latter parts are titled after works, such as "Der Ring des Nibelungen" or "Parsifal". There are 56 illustrations, including photos of the people who affected Wagner's life: the adults who raised him, his first wife Minna, Cosima, of course, the Wesendonks, Nietzsche and his sister Elisabeth, the artist Paul Zhukovsky, and that loony Ludwig II. Also explored is the literature that influenced his music, everything from Aristotle's unities to Shakespeare's tragedies; and at the end of the book von Westernhagen has compiled a five-page chronology, a lengthy bibliography, and a complete list of the composer's works. (The reader should be aware that there are passages in German and French that are not always translated, so you should have your librettos or dictionaries ready.) For those who think Wagner dashed off his operas with the ease of an Amadeus, von Westernhagen has a revelation in store: the compositions were often torments, Wagner famously praying for "easy pages". As for what he didn't accomplish, one can always feel that had he lived to be 90, he would have written all his projected symphonies, precluding Mahler. There are those, of course, who hear "The Ring" as a vast choral symphony: "Das Rheingold" = Allegro, "Die Walküre" = Andante, "Siegfried" = Scherzo, "Götterdämmerung" = Adagio. Musings like this will keep you busy while reading von Westernhagen's excellent biography.


A Bouquet: Of Czech Folktales
A Bouquet: Of Czech Folktales
by Karel Jaromír Erben
Edition: Hardcover
Price: $22.50
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Erben legends, May 10, 2013
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Karel Jaromír Erben (1811 - 1870) was a Czechoslovakian scholar and archivist who, like the Brothers Grimm in Germany, collected fairy tales and folk stories from the heritage of his native country, his most famous contribution being this book "A Bouquet of Czech Folktales". I became acquainted with this author through the prolific Czech composer Antonín Dvořák, who, along with his symphonies, concertos, chamber music, and operas, wrote several symphonic poems, four of which are based on Erben's collected tales. (The English translator Marcela Malek Sulak has written an interesting forward in which she describes how she handled the difficulties of this translation.)
These are stories better suited for adult consideration than as bedtime entertainment for children. You think the Brothers were grim, Erben was if anything more graphic. For instance, "The Water Sprite" tells how a girl falls (accidently?) into a stream and is abducted by the title character. Eventually she gives birth to his green-haired baby and at that point wants to go back home to mother. The goblin follows her to the cottage, saying he wants someone to look after the child, but the girl's mother tells him to bring the child to them to be cared for. Enraged, the Water Sprite decapitates the baby, then throws its head and torso against the cottage door. So much for bedtime. Similarly, "The Golden Spinning Wheel" (which is my favorite of Dvořák's symphonic poems) has a prince who, traveling through a forest, encounters a lovely maiden and decides to take her to his castle as his wife. But the girl's step-mother and step-sister come at her with knife and axe, cutting off her arms and legs and gouging out her eyes; then the step-sister replaces the girl as the prince's intended ... taking her victim's arms, legs, and eyes with her! A mysterious hermit creates a beautiful spinning wheel for the castle and its price is: two arms, two legs, two eyes. Once the hermit has these, he recreates the lovely maiden, who can then take her rightful place as princess, the spinning wheel itself having revealed the step-sister's wickedness.
These are only two examples of Erben's strange fables, some of which are really more mood pieces than narratives, and they make an arresting addition to any library of folklore. (I use the word "fables", though you won't find any talking animals.) The tales are illustrated by Alén Divís, a tragic Czech of the 20th Century who produced dark (in every sense of the word) oils and water colors. His haunted vision here contributes perfectly to Erben's stories from another nether world.


Steve Jobs
Steve Jobs
by Walter Isaacson
Edition: Hardcover
Price: $20.83
1470 used & new from $0.01

5.0 out of 5 stars iJobs, April 28, 2013
This review is from: Steve Jobs (Hardcover)
Author Walter Isaacson must have a strong sense of continuity. His excellent 2007 biography of Albert Einstein, who died in April 1955, was followed up by 2011's equally good biography of Steve Jobs, who was born in February 1955. It's an honest, unflattering portrait of the entrepreneur, with no sugar-coating of Jobs's prickly personality. Impatient and superior towards other people, he could often be a hostile boss at Apple, at one point being ousted. Worse, he could show a bullying attitude towards service employees in restaurants, the earmark of a mean streak. At board meetings in Cupertino Jobs would be ranting one minute, sobbing the next (weeping came easy to him), a sign of insecurity, to say the least, perhaps the legacy of an adopted child. His biological father was a Syrian student, and you can see the Syrian heritage in photographs, particularly in images of Jobs as a young man. (The book is illustrated by about 40 photos.) Jobs loved his adoptive father, flatly refused to ever meet his biological father, and on the whole, his relations with people could be difficult; luckily, he met a sensible woman who gave him a successful marriage. Raised in the middle class (unlike patrician coeval Bill Gates), millionaire Jobs held his 30th birthday at the St Francis Hotel, Ella Fitzgerald singing "Happy Birthday". Not bad for a boy who started his technological empire in a Palo Alto garage.
A couple of times when I was reading this book in a coffee shop, a member of what could be called the iGeneration would notice and gush "Oh, he was great! He was sooo cool!" Yes, he was very much a man of his time, which I'm sure contributed to his great success. There's no indication that he was a zealous reader; and, aside from a somewhat passive appreciation of J. S. Bach, he showed no interest in music written before the 1950s. (In fact he was friends with Bono and even dated Joan Baez.) Was he really smart? Isaacson says no, not that smart -- only a genius, like Thomas Alva Edison and Henry Ford. Sadly, unlike those two titans, Jobs did not live to old age: he died of cancer at age 56. But Isaacson, ever objective, handles the untimely death with clear-eyed sympathy. There's no Little Eva deathbed scene here. Instead Jobs has (as usual) the last word: "Click! And you're gone," he is quoted as saying. "Maybe that's why I never liked to put off-on switches on Apple devices."


Ted Williams: The Biography of an American Hero
Ted Williams: The Biography of an American Hero
by Leigh Montville
Edition: Paperback
Price: $13.78
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4.0 out of 5 stars The Splinter, splendid and otherwise, March 26, 2013
For those of us who always thought of Theodore Samuel Williams as the strong silent type, Leigh Montville's 2004 book "Ted Williams, the Biography of an American Hero" has a surprise in store: Strong, yes, but Ted Williams was a loud motormouth, opiniated rants packed with four-letter words. It wasn't that rare for patrons in a restaurant to complain about his presence. This was evidently not an attribute he acquired as a Boston Red Sox star, but one he was born with in San Diego. With an absent father and a mother (little known fact: Williams was Hispanic on his maternal side) obsessed with Salvation Army work, Ted and his black-sheep brother Danny pretty much raised themselves; but Ted turned out to be a sound dollar, his brother a bad penny. Ted's athletic talent was recognized early, and he entered the majors when he was only 19. Eager and energetic, he quickly became one of the main draws in baseball, which brought adulation as well as criticism. Williams always thought of sports writers as his enemies, especially Dave Egan of the Boston Herald, called the Colonel, who seemed, in column after column, to take an almost personal dislike to the popular outfielder. Williams also did not trust the "contest" set up by the press in 1941 between Ted and Yankees star Joe DiMaggio. One of the 88 photographs in the book shows Ted posing with Dominic DiMaggio on his left, both in their Red Sox uniforms, Dom's brother Joe on Ted's right in his Yankee stripes. (Other interesting photos show Ted teeing off with Babe Didrikson and practicing his fly fishing. Baseball was not his only sport.) As for his personal life ... well, obviously Ted was not easy to get along with. There is a remarkable 15-page interview, taped by an amateur sports writer with Ted's third wife Dolores. Evidently the interviewer thought this was going to be another sunny complacent conversation with a baseball wife, but it turned into a rambling bitter exposé of real domestic life behind the major league glamour. The interview never aired. Dolores was also the mother of John Henry Williams, who came under fire during his father's old age when the son's increasingly exploitative treatment of his father's fame caused many to charge elder abuse. The last chapters, dealing with Williams' remains being cryogenically embalmed under his son's supervision get rather spooky; and it's just as well that John Henry died of leukemia just before this book was published. It's an honest book, much better-written I believe than Montville's biography of Babe Ruth. Though it seems to spend more time off the field than on -- Williams in World War II and Korea, for instance -- it successfully presents the many sharp sides of the Splendid Splinter.


Stonewall Jackson
Stonewall Jackson
by James I. Robertson Jr.
Edition: Hardcover
Price: $70.00
116 used & new from $7.62

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars The very cyclone of battle, March 12, 2013
This review is from: Stonewall Jackson (Hardcover)
A ferocious warrior with a deeply spiritual nature, Thomas J Jackson deserved the sobriquet he was given at the first Battle of Bull Run; and, in his 1997 biography "Stonewall Jackson, the Man, the Soldier, the Legend", James I Robertson has attempted to understand and explain this complex and often confusing person. Raised in the mountains of Virginia, his childhood was marked by poverty and loneliness, which may have caused his sternly peculiar aloofness as an adult. A "strange but always inspiring leader", Robertson calls him. In fact, his eccentricities caused many of his contemporaries to consider him legally insane. Deeply religious, constantly praying, not so much as a child but later at West Point (where he was sent under Congressional sponsorship) Jackson believed that everything was brought about by God and that one owed Him utter reverence. For instance, he had no qualms about fighting for the Cause because he felt that if slavery existed it was ordained by God, ergo it had to be protected from abolition, even to the extent of Civil War. After West Point he served in the Army briefly in Mexico and Florida before joining the staff at the Virginia Militrary Institute, returning to service at the outbreak of hostilities. Though Jackson was fundamentally a loner, he had an adoring wife and during the War Jeb Stuart became one of Jackson's closest compatriots. On the other hand, Jackson and Robert E Lee fought together on the field but one gets the impression they were never close friends; Lee was several years older than Jackson, and of course Lee was aristocracy. Robertson enjoys depicting the two men in conference, Lee resplendant in gray with gold braid, his white beard neatly clipped, Jackson looking like "a farmer who has been plowing all day". The latter had a homey, almost lazy way of commanding -- and he could fall asleep so easily and often inappropriately one suspects he suffered narcolepsy -- but at the same time his alert leadership caused one soldier to call him "the very cyclone of battle". This book, two-thirds of which are set during the War, is a long month's read, but it is very well-written with emphasis on the strategy and skill of the title general, his colleagues and his enemies. West Pointers will revel in the extremely detailed attention given to the various campaigns -- e.g., the incredible carnage of Antietam, thousands of American farmboys frantically killing each other -- but even we non-Pattons are able to appreciate the maneuverings that drove both the Johnny Rebs and the Billy Yanks to battle. There are 15 sketchy maps to help us follow the operations, but here I must bring the reader's attention to an important volume, the "American Heritage Picture History of the Civil War", published during the Centennial. It's an excellent reference book when one is reading a biography/history such as Robertson's, filled as it is with topographical maps, images of the1860s , and modern photographs of the peaceful meadows and fields where once was fought "a bloody, totally unnecessary collision".


The Tristan Chord: Wagner and Philosophy
The Tristan Chord: Wagner and Philosophy
by Bryan Magee
Edition: Paperback
Price: $18.69
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars The world as Wagnerian music, February 5, 2013
The British teacher and author Bryan Magee has approached Richard Wagner in the past (in his "Aspects of Wagner"), but never has he presented Wagner as an artist so deeply influenced by philosophy as he does in "The Tristan Chord: Wagner and Philosophy". Magee is a perceptive scholar and evidently a very good teacher. Anyone who can make Kant, Schopenhauer and Nietzsche lucid has got to be good. Wagner became entranced by Schopenhauer's "The World as Will and Representation" at the age of 41, and its spellbinding influence stayed with him for the rest of his life. An atheist, Schopenhauer saw the world, dominated by the Will to have and keep, as a grasping, relentlessly unhappy place. We can escape this torment by entering a metaphysical state similar to the Buddhist Nirvana, a bliss exemplified by music. Bertrand Russell, in "A History of Western Philosophy", can't resist pointing out that Schopenhauer, despite his ethereal pessimism, loved good food, fine wines, and casual affairs. (We won't even discuss his nasty temper.) Similarly, Wagner himself coveted luxury and power. But more important is Schopenhauer's influence on the music dramas themselves -- "The Ring", obviously, but even more so "Tristan und Isolde", with its rejection of the phenomenal world, the longing for death, expertly explained by Magee. He also discusses the other operas with great insight. For instance, in "Die Meistersinger" (written after "Tristan") Wagner reverted to his Romantic roots, composing rhymed verse, a quintet, even a ballet. The longest and most interesting chapter is titled "Wagner and Nietzsche". The philosopher was only 24 when he met Wagner, young enough to be the composer's son, and indeed he became Wagner's somewhat slavish protégé. Their strongest point of reference was Schopenhauer, for they both loved "The World as Will and Representation". Later Nietzsche turned against both Schopenhauer and Wagner, his attacks on the latter ("Is Wagner a human being at all? ... a clever rattlesnake") becoming irrationally bitter. The deterioration of their relationship was exacerbated by Nietzsche's failing health and the indiscretion of a Frankfurt physician (denounced by Magee as "a lightweight, silly fellow") who communicated with a layman, Wagner, in a manner that was professionally inappropriate. Obviously, the most difficult aspect of Wagner for an author to deal with is the undeniable anti-Semitism. But Magee emphasizes that this was a fairly common European attitude and was, of course, more than half a century before the Holocaust. He makes a very strong argument against Wagner's popularity with the Nazis, the idea of Wagner's music being "a sort of sound track to the Third Reich". In fact, he notes, Wagner's popularity in Germany dropped between 1933 and 1940. The anti-Semitic writings are extremely unfortunate, but they can't be taken out of historical context and made to stand for something they were never meant to stand for. Sometimes the prose in "The Tristan Chord" becomes a little awkward, and there is no bibliography, which would have been interesting. But overall this is a fascinating study of brilliant minds meeting in the 19th Century.


Shirley (Penguin Classics)
Shirley (Penguin Classics)
by Charlotte Bronte
Edition: Paperback
Price: $8.52
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A liberated woman in Yorkshire, January 20, 2013
"Shirley", originally published in 1849, was Charlotte Brontë's first novel after "Jane Eyre", and it is very different from that Gothic masterpiece. There is no forbidding landlord housing a dark secret and there is no frothing madwoman in the attic setting fires. Yes, there is one of those family-mystery revelations that the Victorians were so fond of, but otherwise this is a realistic study of pastoral life in Northern England, a sort of precursor to the works of George Eliot (though I personally don't believe Charlotte's talent ever reached that of the author of "Adam Bede"), a rather somber tale of people living under the shadow of the Napoleonic Wars and dealing with the changes wrought by the early years of the Industrial Revolution. The political aspects of the story are only lightly touched on; this is not a historical novel. The dramatis personae is large, and the title character is introduced only after 200 pages. There are two female protagonists, Caroline Helstone, the niece of the local rector, and Shirley Keelgar, the heiress to the Fieldhead manor where much of the action takes place, along with parishes adjoining Stilbro' Moor. (Though the setting is Yorkshire, where Charlotte was raised, the locales in this novel are fictitious.) The two young women are close in age and become friends, even though their personalities are very different. For anyone who has read Elizabeth Gaskell's biography of Charlotte Brontë it should be obvious that Charlotte used her sister Emily as the model for Shirley. Granted, Emily, like Caroline , suffered painful shyness, but she also had Shirley's bluntness, her somewhat overbearing manner. Shirley (note: in the 19th Century this was more often than not a masculine first name) is called the Captain, just as Emily was called the Major, and at one point she commits the indiscretion of whistling like a boy. There is also the mastiff named Tartar owned by Shirley, reminding us of the bulldog kept at Haworth Parsonage and sternly controlled by Emily. Of the Brontë sisters, Emily was the garçon manqué, and, in his beautiful essay on "Wuthering Heights", Somerset Maugham gently suggests she was sapphic. (By the way, Charlotte, who lived in Brussels, will be testing your French.)
Both Caroline and Shirley must deal with some unpleasant male characters, men of the early 19th Century feeling that "dolls" or "monkeys" were only fit for feeding and clothing others -- and increasing the population, of course, which is why they had such contempt for spinsters. In the pivotal Chapter XXXI, Shirley is accosted by her uncle for daring to reject a baronet's proposal: "Are you a young lady?" he demands, to which Shirley replies: "I am a thousand times better. I am an honest woman, and as such I will be treated." You can almost hear the suffragettes cheering. The book is quite long and could be easily condensed, upholstered as it is with the "padding" common to an era when authors were paid by the page. The intertwining two love stories become complex, as the reader tries to decide which of the heroines is going to pair off with which of two Flemish brothers serving as heroes. Also, Charlotte's prose sometimes gets a bit too precious. I mean, when a character enters a room "The door unclosed". Is that anything like "The door opened"? But readers interested in Victorian fiction and the Brontës in particular will probably be patient with these idiosyncrasies and find "Shirley" a consistently rewarding experience.


Hitchcock (Blu-ray / DVD Combo)
Hitchcock (Blu-ray / DVD Combo)
DVD ~ Anthony Hopkins
42 used & new from $2.63

0 of 5 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Dreaming up a nightmare, January 3, 2013
The planning and completion of Alfred Hitchcock's 1960 film "Psycho" is the subject of the new movie "Hitchcock", directed by Sacha Gervasi and starring Anthony Hopkins as the legendary director with Helen Mirren as his long-suffering wife Alma Reville. How much of the picture is authentic and how much fantasy can only be guessed, John McLaughlin's script cleverly imagining Hitchcock haunted by the legend of Ed Gein, author Robert Bloch's protoype for Norman Bates; but Hopkins really bears no resemblance to Hitchcock (the sly charm isn't there) and Scarlett Johansson looks nothing like his specially-billed star Janet Leigh. Because Alma was always a background presence (and her lack of recognition becomes an important plot element here), Helen Mirren's lack of resemblance is not really that essential. According to Janet Leigh in the book she wrote recalling her experience of the filming, the set of "Psycho" was light-hearted and friendly, but you would never guess that from "Hitchcock", because the mood appears to be consistently unhappy. For instance in one scene Hopkins in the role of Hitchcock mocks the talent of John Gavin, a surprising revelation considering that Gavin is still alive. Hitchcock's dismissive attitude towards Vera Miles is explained to a curious Janet Leigh: he had slated Miles to play the lead in "Vertigo" but shortly before shooting was to commence Miles got pregnant (by her then-husband, a baby-faced Tarzan), leaving Hitchcock Madeleine-less, Judy-less, and furious. Writer Joseph Stefano, designer Saul Bass, even star Anthony Perkins only appear briefly, the latter significantly naming "Rope" and "Strangers on a Train" as his two favorite Hitchcocks. And judging from this screenplay, you would never know that the Hitchcocks had a grown daughter, one who was given a small role in "Psycho": Patricia Hitchcock is never mentioned. Fans hoping for an inside look at the technical aspects of "Psycho" will probably be disappointed. The shower bath scene is handled rather perfunctorily, and it's not clear that it took up so much of the shooting schedule; there is only a brief scene of Marion Crane "driving" in front of a rear-projection screen, Hitchcock yelling insults at the character from behind camera; and the melon contest, with casaba the winner, would have been interesting but is ignored. The fact is "Hitchcock" never gets deeply involved in the production so that basically this is just a brisk, somewhat gossipy story of a classic filming.


Sieg Heil! (Hail to victory): An illustrated history of Germany from Bismarck to Hitler
Sieg Heil! (Hail to victory): An illustrated history of Germany from Bismarck to Hitler
by Stefan Lorant
Edition: Hardcover
84 used & new from $0.65

5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An album of history and horror, December 23, 2012
Stefan Lorant (1901-1997) was a Budapest-born photojournalist and film maker (he claimed to have given Marlene Dietrich her first screen test) who published several books over his long lifetime, but probably he never accomplished anything as informative and compelling as 1974's "Sieg Heil! An Illustrated History of Germany from Bismarck to Hitler". As the title suggests, "Sieg Heil!" opens in the mid-19th Century with the Franco-Prussian War, from which the Germans marched triumphant beneath the Brandenburg Gate. That monument appears time and again in the 600 + illustrations, many of them anonymous, which fill the book's 352 pages as Lorant follows Germany's history into the catastrophe of World War I. Following 1918 and the proliferation of opposing political parties, Germany went into a chaotic period of putsche and poverty, barricades and gun battles in Berlin's boulevards while citizens fought over horse meat for food in the streets. The crippling inflation and unemployment of the 1920s was a breeding ground for extremist measures, and into this maelstrom entered Adolph Hitler and his Kampf for political prominence. Hitler's rise to power and his increasingly thug-like tactics (the Jew-baitings, the book burnings) are presented in photographs taken by everyone from Robert Capa to Heinrich Hoffman, interspersed with double-page spreads of everyday life in Germany as well as its pop culture (the night clubs, the cinema) enjoyed by a complacent population. (Lorant enters personal recollections at points in the narrative and he appears in several of the photos.) The photographs are fascinating, many the average reader will never have seen. Once the history enters World War II the images become much more disturbing -- the discoveries at the death camps, of course, but also a photograph taken during the destruction of the Warsaw Ghetto, a young couple huddled in the ruins, having no idea what's going to happen next, Nazi soldiers prowling nearby. Also affecting is the section titled Götterdämmerung, images of German citizens who killed themselves (and their own children) when faced with allied invasion, bringing to an end their victorious dreams. (Interesting contradiction: in "Sieg Heil!" these latter photographs are attributed to Margaret Bourke-White, whereas in a recent Man Ray exhibition the same pictures were attributed to Lee Miller.) The book ends with images of a demolished and occupied Berlin and Bertolt Brecht's philosophical observation: "The great Carthage waged three wars. It remained powerful after the first, it was still habitable after the second -- it disappeared after the third." As the saying goes, a picture tells a thousand words, but in "Sieg Heil!" you have both the pictures and words to give you a stunning evocation of political and military events affecting the personal lives in an entire generation.


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