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About Identifying Whether an E-mail or Webpage is from Amazon

If you receive a suspicious (sometimes called phishing) correspondence, here are some tips to determine if it's an e-mail or webpage from Amazon.com.

If you received correspondence regarding an order you didn't place, it likely wasn't from Amazon.com. Please send the e-mail as an attachment to stop-spoofing@amazon.com. If you are reporting a suspicious URL, put it in the body of the e-mail and send it to stop-spoofing@amazon.com. For more information, go to


Don't open any attachments or click any links from suspicious e-mails. If you've already opened an attachment or clicked a suspicious link, go to Protect Your System.

Amazon will never send you an unsolicited e-mail that asks you to provide sensitive personal information like your social security number, tax ID, bank account number, credit card information, ID questions like your mother's maiden name or your password. If you receive a suspicious e-mail please report it immediately.

Suspicious e-mails or webpages not from Amazon.com often contain:

  • An order confirmation for an item you didn't purchase or an attachment to an order confirmation

    Note: Go to Your Orders to see if there is an order that matches the details in the e-mail. If it doesn't match an order in Your Account, the message isn't from Amazon.

  • Requests for your Amazon.com username and/or password, or other personal information
  • Requests to update payment information

    Note: Go to Your Account and click Manage Payment Options in the Payments section. If you aren't prompted to update your payment method on that screen, the message isn't from Amazon.

  • Links to websites that look like Amazon.com, but aren't Amazon
  • Attachments or prompts to install software on your computer
  • Typos or grammatical errors
  • Forged e-mail addresses to make it look like the e-mail is coming from Amazon.com

    Note: If the "from" line of the e-mail contains an Internet Service Provider (ISP) other than @amazon.com, then it's a fraudulent e-mail.

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