Buy used: $6.99
Get Fast, Free Shipping with Amazon Prime
FREE delivery Saturday, August 20 if you spend $25 on items shipped by Amazon
Or fastest delivery Thursday, August 18. Order within 12 hrs 48 mins
Used: Acceptable | Details
Sold by -OnTimeBooks-
Condition: Used: Acceptable
Comment: Shipped fast and reliably through the Amazon Prime program! We take customer service seriously and have 99% positive feedback! Book may contain some writing, highlighting, and or cover damage.
Access codes and supplements are not guaranteed with used items.
Share <Embed>
Have one to sell?
Loading your book clubs
There was a problem loading your book clubs. Please try again.
Not in a club? Learn more
Amazon book clubs early access

Join or create book clubs

Choose books together

Track your books
Bring your club to Amazon Book Clubs, start a new book club and invite your friends to join, or find a club that’s right for you for free.
Kindle app logo image

Download the free Kindle app and start reading Kindle books instantly on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required. Learn more

Read instantly on your browser with Kindle Cloud Reader.

Using your mobile phone camera - scan the code below and download the Kindle app.

QR code to download the Kindle App

Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more

Follow the Authors

See all
Something went wrong. Please try your request again later.

Dracula (Barnes & Noble Classics) Paperback – Illustrated, May 14, 2004

4.6 out of 5 stars 16,851 ratings

Price
New from Used from
Kindle
Paperback, Illustrated, May 14, 2004
$6.99
$18.00 $0.99

Things We Do in the Dark

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Brooke Allen is a book critic whose work has appeared in numerous publications including The Atlantic Monthly, The New Criterion, The New York Times Book Review, The Wall Street Journal, and The Hudson Review. A collection of her essays, Twentieth-Century Attitudes, will be published in 2003.

Excerpt. © Reprinted by permission. All rights reserved.

From Brooke Allen's Introduction to Dracula

Upon its publication in 1897, Bram Stoker's Dracula was seen as nothing more than a slightly cheesy thriller, if an unusually successful one. Most such "shilling shockers" were forgotten within a year or two. But this one was different: Over the course of the next century Count Dracula, the aristocratic vampire, left his natural habitat between the pages of a book and insinuated himself into the world's consciousness as few other fictional characters haveever done. Now, more than a hundred years after his appearance in print, Dracula has shed the status of "fictional character" altogether and has become an authentic modern myth.

Why has this odd and terrifying figure exerted such a hold on our collective imagination? Why does the image of the vampire both attract and repel, in apparently equal measure? If, as has been argued, Dracula owes its success to its reflection of specific anxieties within the culture, why then has its power continued unabated throughout more than a century of unprecedented social change? Late-Victorian anxieties and concerns were rather different from our own, yet the lure of the vampire and the persistence of his image seem as strong as ever.

Dracula's durability may in part be due to Tod Browning's 1931 film, for when most people think of the character, it is Bela Lugosi's portrayal that springs to mind. But in spite of memorable performances by Lugosi and by Dwight Frye as Renfield, the film is awkward and clunky, even laughable in parts; in terms of shocking, terrible, and gorgeous images, it cannot compare with the novel that inspired it. It is hard to believe that, on its own, it would have created such an indelible impact.

Once Dracula became lodged in the popular imagination, it began to accrue ever-new layers of meaning and topicality. The novel has provided rich material for every fad and fancy of twentieth-century exegesis. It has been deconstructed by critics of the Freudian, feminist, queer theory, and Marxist persuasions, and has had something significant to offer each of these fields. Today, in the age of AIDS, the exchange of blood has taken on a new meaning, and Dracula has taken on a new significance in its turn. For post-Victorian readers, it has been a little too easy to impose a pat "Freudian" reading on the novel, in which the vampire represents deviant, dangerous sexuality, while the vampire-hunters stand for sexual repression in the form of bourgeois marriage and overly spiritualized relationships. This interpretation certainly contains a large element of truth, but the novel's themes are much richer and more complex than such a reading might suggest.

Readers coming to Dracula for the first time should try to peel away the layers of preconception that they can hardly help bringing to the novel. We should try to forget Bela Lugosi; we should try to forget easy (and anachronistic) Freudian cliches; we should put out of our minds all our received twentieth- and twenty-first-century notions of friendship and love, both heterosexual and homosexual. If we let the novel stand on its own, just as it appeared to Bram Stoker's contemporaries in the last years of the Victorian era, what exactly do we find?

Product details

  • ASIN ‏ : ‎ 1593081146
  • Publisher ‏ : ‎ Barnes & Noble Classics; Illustrated edition (May 14, 2004)
  • Language ‏ : ‎ English
  • Paperback ‏ : ‎ 417 pages
  • ISBN-10 ‏ : ‎ 9781593081140
  • ISBN-13 ‏ : ‎ 978-1593081140
  • Reading age ‏ : ‎ 18 years and up
  • Lexile measure ‏ : ‎ 610L
  • Item Weight ‏ : ‎ 12.8 ounces
  • Dimensions ‏ : ‎ 5.19 x 1.12 x 8 inches
  • Customer Reviews:
    4.6 out of 5 stars 16,851 ratings

About the authors

Follow authors to get new release updates, plus improved recommendations.

Customer reviews

4.6 out of 5 stars
4.6 out of 5
16,851 global ratings

Top reviews from the United States

Reviewed in the United States on October 2, 2017
94 people found this helpful
Report abuse
Reviewed in the United States on October 8, 2019
Customer image
1.0 out of 5 stars Fraudulent book at best
By CHESTEROO on October 7, 2019
Entire book was nothing but a smeared photocopy. Unreadable.
Images in this review
Customer image
Customer image
49 people found this helpful
Report abuse
Reviewed in the United States on October 23, 2021
7 people found this helpful
Report abuse
Reviewed in the United States on December 29, 2019
Customer image
1.0 out of 5 stars Incorrectly spelled author name and wrong date
By Kenlyn Kelly on December 29, 2019
Unfortunately the author's name (BRAM STOKER) is spelled wrong on the cover and spine. It is correct on the inside. I'm not trying 2 be picking but I'm a collector or bram stoker's dracula. The publish date is supposed to be October 10, 2019 but it is actually December 26, 2019 (I wanted this book 4 the cover and the publish date which is my birthday). I am not 100% happy.
Images in this review
Customer image Customer image Customer image
Customer imageCustomer imageCustomer image
62 people found this helpful
Report abuse
Reviewed in the United States on July 26, 2022
One person found this helpful
Report abuse
Reviewed in the United States on February 19, 2022
One person found this helpful
Report abuse

Top reviews from other countries

Ukreviewer
5.0 out of 5 stars Barnes Flexibound edition is Beautiful!
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on November 27, 2018
Customer image
5.0 out of 5 stars Barnes Flexibound edition is Beautiful!
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on November 27, 2018
Review of the BARNES FLEXIBOUND EDITION. I wish more people would state which edition they were reviewing, since Amazon group them altogether!
Bought as a gift and this edition is beautiful. I love the vibrant colour and the flexible cover.
My only gripe was a few fine scuffs here and there due to Amazons poor packaging/postal handing. Not much to say...let my photos do the talking!
Images in this review
Customer image Customer image Customer image Customer image Customer image
Customer imageCustomer imageCustomer imageCustomer imageCustomer image
68 people found this helpful
Report abuse
Windshackman
5.0 out of 5 stars Classic gothic horror.
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on November 8, 2018
55 people found this helpful
Report abuse
Rob Ash
5.0 out of 5 stars Beautiful Edition of the Original Dracula at Exceptional Value!
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on May 21, 2020
Customer image
5.0 out of 5 stars Beautiful Edition of the Original Dracula at Exceptional Value!
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on May 21, 2020
I'm not sure it's worth my reviewing the story in this book, since everyone is so familiar with it. But if you haven't actually read this original version then it is well worth doing so, if you can cope with the beautiful classic writing style.

The main reason I wanted to do this review was to let you know just how nice this book is physically.
The format is a Flexibound Edition by Barnes & Noble. It's basically a faux leather-bound cover. Obviously not real leather, it is a soft feel plastic or rubber which is marginally flexible in the hand.
The first and last pages are backed in the old-world style using frantically patterned end papers.
The page edges are colour sprayed to complement the cover.
There is also a page marking ribbon.
Even the relatively thick paper stock has slightly off white colouring and lends itself to the feel of an old original collectable.

In short, for the incredibly low retail price of this book you get an absolutely stunning edition, which looks fantastic on the shelf in a collected set and feels great in the hand as you read. Barnes and Noble do a nice collection in this format. Just search for (Barnes Noble Flexibound editions) on Amazon.
Images in this review
Customer image Customer image Customer image Customer image Customer image Customer image
Customer imageCustomer imageCustomer imageCustomer imageCustomer imageCustomer image
13 people found this helpful
Report abuse
Comrade X
3.0 out of 5 stars Penguin Classics Edition? Not Original.
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on September 24, 2020
9 people found this helpful
Report abuse
SusannahB
4.0 out of 5 stars Count Dracula
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on February 10, 2020
4 people found this helpful
Report abuse