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Deliver Us from Evil 2006

UNRATED CC
Available on Prime

Moving from one parish to another in Northern California during the 1970s, Father Oliver O'Grady quickly won each congregation's trust and respect. Unbeknownst to them, O'Grady was a dangerously active pedophile that Church hierarchy.

Starring:
Adam, Jeff Anderson
Runtime:
1 hour, 43 minutes

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Product Details

Genres Documentary
Director Amy Berg
Starring Adam, Jeff Anderson
Supporting actors Pope Benedict XVI, Monsignor Cain, Case Degroot, Jane Degroot, Thomas Doyle, Mary Gail Frawley-O'Dea, Bill Hodgman, Anne Jyono, Bob Jyono, Maria Jyono, Frank Keating, Roger Mahony, John Manly, Oliver O'Grady, Nancy Sloan, Mike Walker, Patrick Wall, Paula Zahn
Studio Lionsgate
MPAA rating Unrated (Not Rated)
Captions and subtitles English Details
Purchase rights Stream instantly Details
Format Amazon Video (streaming online video)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By J.A. VINE VOICE on May 15, 2007
Format: DVD
Oliver O'Grady is a pedophile who preyed on girls and boys for almost thirty years, was sentenced to fourteen years in prison for his crimes, served seven, and is now living in Ireland where he doesn't need to register anywhere as a sex offender (and indeed, the family he's currently living with knows nothing of his past - although I gather they do now), and lives in semi-comfort from an annuity provided to him by the Catholic church.

Oh, and he was a priest. A Catholic priest.

Oh, yeah, and his diocese was fully aware of his pedophilia, may have been aware of it prior to his donning the robes, and shuffled him around from parish to parish, in one instance even promising the police that in his next position he would not have contact with children. On that last one, they lied. His "next position" placed him in full charge of nearly half a county of Catholics.

What was most surprising to me while watching this documentary, presented evenly and without prejudice by Amy Berg (and nominated for an Oscar for Best documentary), was that I was only mildly surprised by most of the information presented. At the end of the film we are told that a bishop who held several positions of office in the diocese during O'Grady's "tenure", Bishop Mahoney, now presides over a diocese where there are more than five hundred and fifty (yes - 550) pending charges against priests for pedophilia. And O'Grady's annuity is likely a payoff for his silence. Were he to testify to what HE knows regarding what the DIOCESE knew (they claim to know little), we assume that the diocese, Bishop Mahoney, and countless other heads would roll. How comforting to know that an organization beset with pedophiles can still buy itself a bit of peace and quiet.
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9 Comments 135 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
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Maybe it's not fair for me to review a film I was honored to both edit and serve as one of the producers. But no less fair than the first review -- scribed by Tod Tamberg, the official spokesperson for the archdiocese of Los Angeles.

I won't pick apart his "facts" one by one. Director Amy Berg has already done so, numerous times in the press.

The only one I'll highlight is a statement which best serves as an example of how far some will go to disparage the film and director:

Mr. Tamberg claims above that Amy Berg used "special effects... placing O'Grady at a playground full of children". Why or how he came to that conclusion is pure fantasy. O'Grady was really there. In Ireland. Free. And able to roam near children, un-supervised. Amy Berg chose to document this on camera because the story needs to be brought to public attention. The shot causes outrage because the situation is outrageous. And the only special effect at play is the illusion Mr. Tamberg wishes to cast forth -- that this film is "entertainment" and that the long-standing horrific problem of pedophile priests in the Catholic church is a "conspiracy theory".

Amy and the producers of this documentary, including one who is a practicing Catholic, were adamant about keeping the story fair, factual and accurate.

For those who see the film, you will be inspired by the incredible words, wisdom and leadership of Catholic Priest Thomas Doyle. He is our hero and in my personal opinion, a better spokesperson.

Matthew Cooke

Editor / Producer

Deliver Us From Evil
4 Comments 92 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
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I don't cry easily, but there are scenes in this movie that tear your heart out and you will probably never forget. This is definitely not a film for everyone. You can see, in all its emotional rawness, the toll pedophilia takes on a victim and their family: the shame, the self-blame, and the loss of faith. These scenes are in contrast with interviews with O'Grady himself. If you met O'Grady on the street, one's impression would probably be of a kindly, old Irish gentlemen who may have done a few wrong things in his life. But behind this gentlemenly veneer is a monster who is so egotistical that he believes his former victims would like to reconcile with him. Of course, the other character in the film is the Catholic Church, which cannot seem to grasp that you can't enable pedophiles and still serve the community in good faith. The Church comes off as egotistical as O'Grady: we need to hide these dirty deeds in order to present a nice face to the public and help them along on salvation.

The one criticism of the film I had is the psychological speculation on why priests abuse. This is just theorizing by the psychological community and detracts from the rest of the film. Instead it comes off as an agenda for priests to marry. The film would be better served by sticking to the story: priest abuse and enabling by the Catholic Church.

I find it odd that Tom Tamberg claims that the Church is also a victim of O'Grady. Such a statement might be believeable if the O'Grady case was an isolated incident, but the pattern of abuse and denial by the Church over a wide variety of pedophile cases makes any claim completely incredible. Instead Tamberg's arguments belong in the pile with the rest of the refusals to take responsibility, which is why this endemic pedolphilia problem arose in the first place.
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