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Outrage - The Way of the Yakuza (English Subtitled) 2010

R CC

When a tough yakuza gangster is betrayed by his bosses, it means all out war. Bodies pile up as he takes out everyone in his way to the top in a brutal quest for revenge. From action legend Takeshi Kitano.

Starring:
Takeshi Kitano, Kippei Shîna
Runtime:
1 hour, 49 minutes

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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Amazon Video
If go into thinking this is an action movie, you may be disappointed. The cover and title make it seem like it's a crime-action film when really it's more of a violent drama. If you've seen Violent Cop, Sonatine, or Fireworks, then you'll understand the tone of Takeshi Kitano's work. It's a slow burn with intrigue, double crosses, brutal, but quick violence, and an underlying sadness. No one can be trusted. Everyone has something to gain from other's misfortune.

Outrage tells the story of Otomo, a long time enforcer that doesn't get much recognition or respect from those above him. His bosses lie and use him, and in some ways, he even knows this happens. But he's just doing his job. He isn't bothered by getting his hands dirty and he may be the best at it, so what of it? This changes, however, when his boss is asked to break a pact with another family head by the chairman (if you're unfamiliar with Yakuza ranks, think Don). Otomo's boss then has him start a small war that quickly escalates until Otomo can't even trust those he believed were friends. He may not even be able to trust those he respects most.

This is not a film for the faint of heart. It's not a film for those who are looking for big set pieces. It's a slow burn, but the acting, Cinematography and writing are so pitch perfect that it's worth a look. It's violent, understated, and artful like the Godfather. There is so much going on in every scene that with every rewatch you get more out of it. Kitano is at his best when tackling hard subjects like loyalty, self-worth, and honor. It's rare to see someone that can do it all in this age, and I'm glad he keeps putting out fantastic films to this day. Check out the sequel, Beyond Outrage as well. It's definitely worth the price.
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Format: Blu-ray Verified Purchase
There are many things that set this movie apart from other Yakuza films, or for that matter, gangster films in general. This movie, and its companion, Beyond Outrage, more than any other Yakuza film, forces you to look at the utter brutality of the gangster lifestyle. This movie is graced with good acting, believable characters, smart script, and spacious, beautiful camera shots.There is a gritty, unvarnished atmosphere to this film which gives its depiction of the “Way of the Yakuza,” its subtitle, an air of authenticity.

The characters in this and its companion movie are depicted as a pack of wild dogs who make their counterparts in Reservoir Dogs look like kindergarten students.

This film follows the rivalries of two rival Yakuza gangs. Much of the movie is spent seeing the various gangsters position against themselves . The soundtrack, what little there is, is at an absolute minimum. This alone forces you to see the Yakuza members bicker, argue, yell, bargain, betray, and kill among themselves. In this regard the dialogue must be followed closely to see how the members try to double-cross and triple-cross each other.

The violence is unadorned, done in a matter-of-fact manner. If there is an execution, you will not hear a “Tah-Dah!” in the background; the only thing you will hear is a “Bang!” It is truly the banality of evil. Tony Soprano could learn a thing or two from these fellas.

The stand-out performance, in a cast of strong performances, was that of the corrupt police detective, a real weasel. I do not believe the screen has portrayed such a slimy, vile, despicable, venal, conniving, cunning, or duplicitous cop on the take in modern movie history.
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Format: DVD
This is a Japanese gangsta flick from the directorial hand of Takeshi Kitano. It is a full throttle story of the Yakuza and the various families (or crime syndicates) that control the Kanto region. It is full of intrigue and double plotting but the one thing that runs as a vein throughout this film is violence. Good old fashioned, medieval, nasty violence.

The Uber crime Lord is called Mr Chairman and actually does dress like some despotic ruler of a `democratic republic' like say North Korea. Even his servants wear the same white tracksuits - even when they are serving dinner, I think you will find that Debretts classes that as a massive faux pas, but hey these are Japanese Mafiosi types and so probably aren't well read.

He discovers that two of his under lords have made some sort of pact to be `sworn brothers' whilst both serving time in one of Japans 1 star detention facilities. This he does not like and so demands that a sort of insult be done to prove that not all brothers do get along. Well one thing leads to another and as face is lost, and a few other bits - like fingers-, the retaliations ramp up. The land and powere grabs all come at a price and the fortunes of each change with the rapidity of a guns magazine being emptied.

This is acted, directed and filmed in a stylish and no holds barred way. It just roars along, and keeps the shocks coming. There are some well inventive ways of dealing with your enemies and some brutal violence that made me squirm. The Japanese codes of honour and rampant disrespect to your underlings are heavily in evidence. This is just naked greed meets unfettered ambition in a tsunami of double crosses and violence and I thought it was excellent.

This is not one for the squeamish but all lovers of extreme Asian cinema will find a place for this in their collections. In Japanese with a smidgin of English, this is not that short a film but just flew by for me - highly recommended.
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