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Rabbit Hole 2010

PG-13 CC
Available on Prime

This is the extraordinary love story of Becca and Howie. Just 8 months ago, they had a picture-perfect life with their young son. Now, they are posing as normal in the wake of an enormous loss; blindly looking for footing in a sea of new emotions.

Starring:
Nicole Kidman, Aaron Eckhart
Runtime:
1 hour, 31 minutes

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Product Details

Genres Drama
Director John Cameron Mitchell
Starring Nicole Kidman, Aaron Eckhart
Supporting actors Dianne Wiest, Miles Teller, Tammy Blanchard, Sandra Oh, Giancarlo Esposito, Jon Tenney, Stephen Mailer, Mike Doyle, Roberta Wallach, Patricia Kalember, Ali Marsh, Yetta Gottesman, Colin Mitchell, Deidre Goodwin, Julie Lauren, Rob Campbell, Jennifer Roszell, Marylouise Burke
Studio Lions Gate
MPAA rating PG-13 (Parents Strongly Cautioned)
Captions and subtitles English Details
Purchase rights Stream instantly Details
Format Amazon Video (streaming online video)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By K. Harris HALL OF FAMETOP 100 REVIEWER on January 15, 2011
Format: DVD
When I heard that John Cameron Mitchell, the mad genius behind the explosive "Hedwig and the Angry Inch," (which he wrote, directed and starred in) was taking the directing chores on an upscale adaptation of a Pulitzer Prize winning play--I thought to myself, this could be interesting. Mitchell, however, shows incredible restraint with "Rabbit Hole"--a searing drama about loss and survival. While opening up the play with this film version, he really didn't have to stray too far from the exquisitely moving source material. Playwright David Lindsay-Abaire was on hand to bring his own words to the big screen, and Mitchell puts his trust in those words! But beyond that, a cast led by Nicole Kidman and Aaron Eckhart lend this piece a real life urgency and poignancy. Although infused with sadness, "Rabbit Hole" achieves its quiet power in depicting our choice to live--even when all our instincts tell us otherwise.

In short, "Rabbit Hole" is a survivor's story. Set eight months after a tragic accident that claimed the life of their son, the film introduces us to Kidman and Eckhart as the coping parents. Still reeling, and remaining somewhat isolated, they exist on a day to day basis. Each, in their own way, is ready to move on--but they just need the catalyst to do so. Neither, however, can truly fulfill the needs of their partner. While understanding the nature of the accident, each still battles with their personal guilt in what happened and it has put an undeniable strain on their marriage. Kidman forges an uneasy relationship with the teenager who actually ran over their son, while Eckhart has a tentative flirtation and easy camaraderie with another member of a grief counseling support group. They are seeking an outlet that they can't or won't get from one another.
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Format: DVD
"Rabbit Hole," based on the play with the same name by David Lindsay-Abaire and directed by John Mitchell Cameron, is an almost two hour insightful commentary on grief, more specifically the grief of two parents who have lost their four-year-old child because of an accident. He chased his dog into the street and ran in front of a car. The film opens eight months after the accident. Howie (Aaron Eckhart) and Becca (Nicole Kidman) are the parents consumed with their loss. They try practically everything-- going to a support group for parents who have lost children, getting rid of their son's clothes, letting a relative (at first) keep the dog, putting their house on the market for sale-- in an effort to get through what has to be the tragedy of all tragedies for parents, the loss of a child. Of course the question on every viewer's mind is whether Howie and Becca's marriage-- they obviously love each other very much-- will survive the horror they find themselves in.

The film progresses from one intense deeply moving scene to another, but two stood out for me: (1) Howie and Becca attend the support group and are listening to one grieving father explain that God took his child because he needed another angel. Becca responds that she doesn't understand. Since he is God, why couldn't he just make another angel without bothering with the man's child. (2) Becca asks her mother (Dianne Wiest) does one ever get over the death of a child. (Becca's brother, a drug addict, has died as a fairly young man and is the cause of much conflict between her mother and her when her mother compares the two deaths.) Her mother responds that one never gets over the death of a child, but that the pain becomes different and something one can bear.
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Format: Blu-ray Verified Purchase
I followed the release of this movie with interest, though I couldn't bear to go see it at the theatre. I read the critical reviews, and they were mixed, though I knew, good or bad, I would eventually see the film for myself. I am a grieving father. I lost my 18 year old daughter to a drunk driver in February of 2008. I watched the movie on dvd one weekend when my wife was out of town.

I find the reviews of this film predictable. There are those who recognize the authenticity of it and those who don't, just as there are those who understand grief and those who don't, simply because they haven't experienced it for themselves. As one who has experienced it - grief - I can only say that the portrayal of the characters in this film is remarkably accurate. Some reviewers judge the responses of the characters, others criticize the film for being too "sentimental". How can anyone be too sentimental about the death of a child? When you have walked this road, you will be surprised. You will not understand the reactions of your closest friends, or even your own. As with Becca and her mother, my mother and I both lost 18 rear old daughters. I didn't really understand my Mother's grief until I lost my own daughter. Recently we met to record my sister's story for StoryCorps, and on the way to the interview, we talked about how we both have come to the realization that we must give ourselves permission to do whatever we need to do in order to survive - even if those closest to us do not understand, even if we can't understand or articulate our motivations ourselves.

Some people do get stuck in grief. Some try to numb their pain with drugs or alcohol or sexual indulgence. Some withdraw and isolate themselves.
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