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Bag It 2011

NR CC

What starts as a film about plastic bags evolves into a extensive investigation into plastic and its effect on our waterways, oceans and even our bodies.

Starring:
Jeb Berrier, Jared Blumenfeld
Runtime:
1 hour, 18 minutes

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Product Details

Genres Drama, Documentary, Comedy
Director Suzan Beraza
Starring Jeb Berrier, Jared Blumenfeld
Supporting actors Martin Bourque, Michael Braungart, David Chameides, Theo Colborn, Richard Conlin, Peter Coyote, Linden Dahlkemper, Sylvia Earle, Marcus Eriksen, Suzanne Frazer, Eric Goldstein, Elizabeth Griffin, Scott Harrison, Dan Imhoff, Chris Jordan, John Klavitter, Annie Leonard, Brady Montz
Studio Reel Thing Productions LLC
MPAA rating NR (Not Rated)
Captions and subtitles English Details
Purchase rights Stream instantly Details
Format Amazon Video (streaming online video)

Other Formats

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By K. Harris HALL OF FAMETOP 100 REVIEWER on February 28, 2012
Format: DVD
There is no denying that there is a good message and a big heart behind the documentary "Bag It." At a mere 79 minutes, the film raises a lot of points about the dangers of plastics from a number of different angles (pollution, resource management, questionable chemical additives). By no means is "Bag It" the first or the last film that will cover this familiar terrain. But while I am very familiar with all of the arguments that the film raises, the movie offers a unique and appealing everyman guide in narrator Jeb Berrier. One of my common complaints in environmental documentaries is that they can tend to lack focus. With so much wrong in the world today, they can bludgeon the viewer with doom and gloom (and instead of inspiring me to act, they sometimes make me feel defeated by the futility of it all). So I was pleasantly surprised for most of "Bag It" as Berrier (and filmmaker Suzan Beraza) delineated their focus so specifically. As a practical and comprehensive argument against single use plastic containers (such as the ubiquitous grocery bag), it may well be the best documentary of its kind that I've seen (and I've seen a lot)!

Beraza's piece won me over completely as Berrier starts his quest to discover the harms caused by something as innocuous as a simple grocery bag. The film succeeds in establishing the ecological harms of single use plastic. The affects of this limitless waste is well supported and the trauma caused to our oceans and wildlife is particularly haunting. It makes a compelling case that the use of money and resources to create this product serves no particular purpose and is a real (but silent) drain on the economy. It offers some alternatives for personal use, as well as some larger examples of communities that have taken action.
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The combination of a light touch and humor, real emotion (halfway into
filming the on-screen narrator finds he is going to have a baby, so
suddenly the issue involved gets much more personal), intelligent
presentation of facts without screaming in your ear or overstatement,
and the (sadly comic) attempts to be balanced and get the chemical
industry to go on the record add up to a much more enjoyable and
effective environmental documentary than most.

This is the kind of film that makes you want to change your own habits,
and believe you can make a difference, while never feeling like you're
sitting through a 'this is good for you' lecture. It reminded me of
Michael Moore's documentaries, in its playful tone about a serious
issue, but this has a lighter, less sarcastic, more lovable hand.

This would also be a terrific educational tool for 'tweens and teens
(there's probably a bit too much slightly, good naturedly ribald humor
for little kids, and some of the sad images of wildlife killed or
injured by plastics might be a bit upsetting for tots).

Kudos to all involved for this timely and important work that will
certainly effect my relationship to plastics in my world.
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Format: Amazon Video
There is no denying that there is a good message and a big heart behind the documentary "Bag It." At a mere 79 minutes, the film raises a lot of points about the dangers of plastics from a number of different angles (pollution, resource management, questionable chemical additives). By no means is "Bag It" the first or the last film that will cover this familiar terrain. But while I am very familiar with all of the arguments that the film raises, the movie offers a unique and appealing everyman guide in narrator Jeb Berrier. One of my common complaints in environmental documentaries is that they can tend to lack focus. With so much wrong in the world today, they can bludgeon the viewer with doom and gloom (and instead of inspiring me to act, they sometimes make me feel defeated by the futility of it all). So I was pleasantly surprised for most of "Bag It" as Berrier (and filmmaker Suzan Beraza) delineated their focus so specifically. As a practical and comprehensive argument against single use plastic containers (such as the ubiquitous grocery bag), it may well be the best documentary of its kind that I've seen (and I've seen a lot)!

Beraza's piece won me over completely as Berrier starts his quest to discover the harms caused by something as innocuous as a simple grocery bag. The film succeeds in establishing the ecological harms of single use plastic. The affects of this limitless waste is well supported and the trauma caused to our oceans and wildlife is particularly haunting. It makes a compelling case that the use of money and resources to create this product serves no particular purpose and is a real (but silent) drain on the economy. It offers some alternatives for personal use, as well as some larger examples of communities that have taken action.
Read more ›
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My son told me about this and asked me to watch it, I did, and the last few days since watching this documentary can only be described as conscious. When I put something away in the fridge, I try to choose a container I will use again. When I use a Ziplock I wash it out and put it away to be used again. I haven't forgotten my cloth and reusable plastic bags to use at the store. IKEA has some for .75 that fold up small enough to fit a couple or three in your purse or one in your pocket. I did forget my car cup when I went for coffee and I felt bad about it, not just slightly remiss. I've been watching the recycle symbols on things I buy to make sure they have a 1 or 2. I will be writing to companies to ask them to make sure they are using those recyclables. I will also request they make large refill sizes for soap and the like. I'd use bar soap but it kills my skin.
This documentary is that eye opening. It will change how you think about everything you consume. Watch it and encourage others to as well, try not to be too obnoxious about it :).
All in all it was an easy film to watch, entertaining as well as informative. Dragged a bit towards the end but not so much I was wondering when it would be over.
04/03/2015
I just wanted to update that we haven't purchased but one new box of plastic storage bags since we watched this, and they are for long term storage, and will used again. We still use plastic trash bags, as we don't see any way to do away with them and keep sanitary.
On a side note, since we have been using reusable containers our crisper and our meat keeper are much cleaner, and our produce keeps longer, our stuff in the freezer keeps better. So not only does using single use bags hurt the environment, they cost you more money, as your food doesn't last as long.
Thanks for the documentary. Good stuff.
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