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Walk, Don't Run 1966

NR CC

A charming businessman turns busy matchmaker when he sublets his flat during the Tokyo Olympics. Cary Grant's final screen role.

Starring:
Cary Grant, Samantha Eggar
Runtime:
1 hour, 53 minutes

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Product Details

Genres Romance, Comedy
Director Charles Walters
Starring Cary Grant, Samantha Eggar
Supporting actors Jim Hutton, John Standing, Miiko Taka, Ted Hartley, Ben Astar, George Takei, Teru Shimada, Lois Kiuchi, Holger Abro, Isabel Boniface, Vickey Cason, Alan Chee, David Draper, Sonja Haney, Sonya Harrison, Andre Hemmers, Susan Ikeda, Dale Ishimoto
Studio Columbia Pictures
MPAA rating NR (Not Rated)
Captions and subtitles English Details
Purchase rights Stream instantly Details
Format Amazon Video (streaming online video)

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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By M. Hart on December 5, 2004
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
In 1966, Cary Grant retired from his distinguished 34-year acting career after starring in the lighthearted romantic comedy "Walk, Don't Run". Set in Tokyo, Japan during the 1964 Olympics, Sir William Rutland (Cary Grant, 1904-1986), a very wealthy British industrialist, arrived in Tokyo two days ahead of schedule and the lavish Okura Hotel (where he is supposed to stay) has no rooms available. In fact, the Olympics have placed a giant "no vacancy" sign across the entire city of Tokyo. Frustrated, William goes to the British Embassy to seek out assistance in locating a room. There, he is seen by the snobbish & indifferent Julius P. Haversack (John Standing) whose attitude changes towards Sir William upon discovering who Sir William is. Sir William wanders out of Mr. Haversack's office and finds a bulletin board with a advertisement to share an apartment. Desperate to have a place to sleep, Sir William grabs the advertisement and travels to its address. Upon arriving, the woman who rents the apartment, Christine Easton (Samantha Eggar), doesn't want to share her apartment with a man, but is unable to convince Sir William to leave and reluctantly allows him to stay. The following day, while Sir William is conducting business with a Japanese company, he comes across an American busily taking pictures and making notes about the building's architecture. The American, Steve Davis (Jim Hutton, 1934-1979), is part of the American Olympic team, but is reluctant to discuss which event he is in. Also, insufficient room in the Olympics' housing has left Steve homeless, so he immediately latches upon Sir William to stay with him. Of course, Miss Easton is not particularly happy to discover that Sir William has sublet his part of the apartment, but again very reluctantly lets Steve stay as well.Read more ›
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Walk, Don't Run was a delightful surprise. It was Cary Grant's last movie, in which he proves that he's not only gorgeous and charming, but also a king of comedy. Whether searching for a pair of elusive pants, playing with an ubiquitous couple of Japanese children, or "dropping by" one of the Olympic races, there's no one funnier than him. A very good movie and an unforgettable star.
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Even old as he is at this stage in 1966 (he was around 62), it's still weird to see Cary Grant onscreen playing matchmaker instead of playing the field. Still, he accomplishes even his matchmaking role with his usual style and grace, and you get the feeling that he could've stolen Samantha Eggar from under Jim Hutton's nose if he put his mind to it. After all, the man is Cary friggin' Grant. Guy invented debonair.

Mr. Grant plays Sir William Rutland, a happily married gent and industrialist on a business trip to Tokyo, except that he's arrived two days earlier than scheduled and his room reservation doesn't kick in yet. Sir William picked a pretty awful date to show up, his visit coinciding with the 1964 Tokyo Olympics, and there is a horrible housing shortage. Luckily, he gets wind at the embassy of a woman willing to take on a roommate, and it's a never mind that Sir William learns that the woman had intended to let only to fellow women. Sir William being played by Cary Grant, he eventually wears down Christine Easton, his new British "landlord."

WALK DON'T RUN made me sad a bit because I knew going in that it was Cary Grant's swan song, the man leaving cinema behind still near the height of his powers. And while WALK DON'T RUN doesn't succeed in all its stabs at levity, it did make me smile in places. Some of the comedy derives from the lovely Christine Easton (Samantha Eggar) being such a precise and super-organized woman. It's a real joy to see that Grant still has masterful control of what he does best, which are those bemused sidelong glances and double takes. He showers these on Christine as she meticulously breaks down the bathroom time table for him.
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Cary Grant does his best in this movie which takes place in the 1964 Olympics in Japan, and the in-jokes about his previous films are appreciated (for example, while doing his morning toilette he sings the song from Carousel). He plays a married businessman who decides to do some matchmaking. But Samantha Eggar is too prissy to be funny or sexy and Jim Hutton is not that charming. So this couple just could not make up for the disparity between Cary's other films where he is the clear romantic lead. The plot so slight, I kept dozing off and having to reboot...Altogether this is one film I don't expect to ever watch again.
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I pine for Cary Grant to this day! Even in his older years, he was charming as ever. "Walk Don't Run" is a pleasant remake of "The More the Merrier" (1943) starring Jean Arthur, Joel McCrea and Charles Coburn (which is a great film by the way.) Mr. Grant plays an affable yet slightly devious matchmaker. The Tokyo Olympics served as a beautiful backdrop for this quirky, romantic comedy. The gorgeous young couple, played by Samantha Eggar and Jim Hutton, were teasingly fun to watch. (Will she let go of her routines? Can he admit to his feelings?) I love watching older films, if not simply for the wonderful ability to step back in time. These were delightful characters to follow. I thoroughly enjoyed this film.
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