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Boyhood 2014

R CC

Filmed over 12 years with the same cast, Richard Linklater's Boyhood is a groundbreaking story of growing up as seen through the eyes of a boy named Mason, who ages from 6-18 years old on screen. Starring Ethan Hawke and Patricia Arquette as Mason's parents.

Starring:
Ellar Coltrane, Patricia Arquette
Runtime:
2 hours, 45 minutes

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Product Details

Genres Drama
Director Richard Linklater
Starring Ellar Coltrane, Patricia Arquette
Supporting actors Elijah Smith, Lorelei Linklater, Steven Chester Prince, Bonnie Cross, Sydney Orta, Libby Villari, Ethan Hawke, Marco Perella, Jamie Howard, Andrew Villarreal, Shane Graham, Tess Allen, Ryan Power, Sharee Fowler, Mark Finn, Charlie Sexton, Byron Jenkins, Holly Moore
Studio Paramount
MPAA rating R (Restricted)
Captions and subtitles English Details
Purchase rights Stream instantly Details
Format Amazon Video (streaming online video)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By Paul Allaer TOP 100 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on August 8, 2014
Format: Blu-ray
In case you haven't heard by now, "Boyhood" (2014 release; 163 min.) brings the story of Mason, a 6 yr. old boy somewhere in Texas, and his family: he's got a sister 2 years older, and his divorced-and-struggling mom. His dad lives in Alaska (although eventually returns to Texas). As the next 2 1/2 hours of the movie unfolds, we get to live with these people as they grow up and deal with life's average (and not so average) struggles. To tell you more would spoil your viewing experience, you'll just have to see for yourself how it all plays out.

Several comments: first, this is the latest movie from writer-director Richard Linklater, who is not unfamiliar with the idea of sticking with characters over a long period of time (he has also brought us the Before Sunrise/Before Sunset/Before Midnight franchise over an 18 year period). But this time Linklater goes yet one better, filming this movie over a 12 year period, and hence we get to see Mason Jr. and his sister Sam grow up before our eyes on the screen, literally. Second, if that were the only remarkable thing about the movie, I'd call it a "stunt". Instead, Linklater is able to weave an emotional story line that most of us can completely relate to (and those that have gone through divorce--such as myself, perhaps even more). I can't even begin to tell you the number of scenes that hit home hard (and not only because I don't want to spoil your viewing experience if you haven't seen the movie yet). Third, the acting performances will blow you away, and that includes all four leading performances (Patricia Arquette as the mom, Ethan Hawke as the dad, Lorelei Linklater (the daughter of Richard) as Sam, and last but certainly not least, Ellar Coltrane as Mason.
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Format: Blu-ray
The dedication Linklater exhibited over 12 years is so clear in how this film is masterfully directed.

We are given but a glimpse of Mason’s major life moments, from the innocence of a young boy explaining his theories on how the world works, through the tumultuous family struggles, and on to the precipice of his life when he now must live his life outside of the camera, outside of the construction that he grows to lament in the latter part of the film.

I was immensely moved by Linklater’s approach to bringing his audience through Mason’s life, not as a spectator sport – viewing long, drawn out scenes where the film spells out how and why an occasion has impacted a character’s life – but rather as we often remember (or rather selectively remember) growing up.

Hard times are accentuated, restful times are simply enjoyed. There is a scene where Mason is driving with his father, stepmother, sister and stepbrother and he learns that his dad sold his classic car. He is visibly upset, and we come to learn that a young 3rd grade Mason received a solemn oath of one day receiving the car from his father who very matter-of-fact can’t recall the conversation and rejects the very notion of even being serious if he did say it.

Boyhood is as I recall growing up – while the circumstances are different, the film is presented with seamless editing year to year. We meet up with Mason, his family and friends, at different stages of his life, and as he discovers and learns how he is growing, how his surroundings are changing, we learn alongside him.

The risk that Linklater took with focusing a story on a child and watching him grow up paid dividends with Ellar Coltrane.
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Format: Amazon Video Verified Purchase
This is a beautiful movie. It is very patient. The story unfolds without the gimmicks we have come to rely on in movies half as long. There is some domestic violence, which is pretty wrenching, but there are no preachy fables about the dangers of experimenting with alcohol, drugs, teen sex, laziness, or daydreaming. Nothing bad happens when kids flirt with each other instead of being responsible at work. Nobody dies when boys drink beer in an abandoned house on a Saturday night. Going to church is not a sign of psychosis; neither is smoking pot. Learning to shoot a gun and learning to shoot a camera are just experiences that kids have in the course of growing up in Texas. Watching this movie, I became hyperaware of my own preprogrammed jumpiness when predictable themes are introduced, like guns or drugs. I can't remember the last time I watched a story unfold that didn't rely on predictable moral positions. The way the film makes you aware of your own programmed responses fits nicely with the boy Mason's skepticism about modern culture's automatonic tendencies. This film is about the beauty and sadness of life--its milestones, disappointments, and unexpected pleasures. Most of all, it is about human connection, about filmmakers watching and listening as life unfolds around them, about parents and children learning to listen to each other, about how learning to really hear another human being is the best thing you can teach anyone.
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Format: Blu-ray
Director/writer Richard Linklater has made a slew of good movies beginning with "Slacker" in 1991. In 1995 he tried something a bit unusual. He paired up Ethan Hawke and Julie Delpy in a movie called "Before Sunrise." The movie focuses on a couple who meet in Vienna, spend a night together and then go on their separate ways. He reunites the couple and the actors 9 years later in "Before Sunset" and again 9 years after that in "Before Midnight." Each film is excellent on its own.

Here Linklater begins filming this movie in 2002 with 7 year old Mason (Ellar Coltrane), his older sister Samantha (Linklater's daughter Lorelei) and divorced Mom (Patricia Arquette) living in Houston. Dad (Ethan Hawke) has gone to work on the pipeline or something in Alaska. He returns to Texas and begins to reconnect with his kids. Linklater then pauses the film, returning each year to film a sequence which takes the family and us along with them for a remarkable journey filled with, frankly, unremarkable events. What we see are life experiences as they happen to the family.

Linklater's focus is certainly on Mason, suggesting some autobiographical input as Linklater grew up and lives in Texas. The yearly changes are subtle to be sure. There are no inter-titles to tell the viewer a year has passed. You will see it in the haircuts, the music, the maturing voice, the stature of Mason and Samantha as they grow into adulthood. It is impossible not to relate to school events, dating, booze, pot, and friends won and lost over time. Many will relate to Mom's poor husband choices, looking for the right father figure only to find menace underneath.

Casting was obviously important in making this film.
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